Catalogue

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The Athabaskan languages [electronic resource] : perspectives on a Native American language family /
edited by Theodore B. Fernald, Paul R. Platero.
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 2000.
description
x, 332 p.
ISBN
0195119479 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 2000.
isbn
0195119479 (Cloth)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Title from e-book title screen (viewed October 16, 2007).
catalogue key
7371285
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
An essential addition to the library of any Athabaskan scholar, but will also contain much of interest to syntacticians of any theoretical persuasion.
"[A]n essential addition to the library of any Athbaskan scholar, but will also contain much of interest to syntacticians of any theoretical persuasion."--General Linguistics
"[A]n essential addition to the library of any Athbaskan scholar, but willalso contain much of interest to syntacticians of any theoreticalpersuasion."--General Linguistics
"[A]n essential addition to the library of any Athbaskan scholar, but will also contain much of interest to syntacticians of any theoretical persuasion."-- General Linguistics
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
The Athabaskan language family, which constitutes the largest group of Amerindian languages, poses linguistic challenges. This is a collection of articles on syntax, semantics and morphology as well as a look at the languages' struggle to survive.
Long Description
The Athabaskan language family constitutes the largest group of Amerindian languages in North America, stretching from Alaska, through the Pacific Northwest, and to the Southwestern states. It includes languages like Navajo and Apache, as well as many lesser known. Over the years Athabaskan has posed a number of challenges for theorists in all areas of linguistics, and has also been the subject of much recent attention - none of which has been collected before now. This volume is a collection of previously unpublished articles on Athabaskan syntax, semantics, and morphology, and will be of interest not only to those with a anthropological interest in North American languages, but also to theoretical linguists concerned with the issues discussed. The book will also be useful in that it directly confronts the problems facing languages like Navajo as they struggle to survive; the list of contributors thus brings together not only prominent linguists (include Navajos) but educators as well.
Long Description
The Native American language family called Athabaskan has received increasing attention from linguists and educators. The linguistic chapters in this volume focus on syntax and semantics, but also involve morphology, phonology, and historical linguistics. Included is a discussion of whether religion and secular issues can be separated in Navajo classrooms.
Main Description
The Native American language family called Athabaskan has received increasing attention from linguists and educators. The linguistic chapters in this volume focus on syntax and semantics, but also involve morphology, phonology, and historical linguistics. Included is a discussion of whetherreligion and secular issues can be separated in Navajo classrooms.
Table of Contents
Recent Volumes Publishedp. ii
Editorial Boardp. ii
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Contributorsp. xi
Introductionp. 3
The Semantics of Classification in Koyukon Athabaskanp. 9
Referencesp. 26
A Semantic Basis for Navajo Syntactic Typologyp. 28
Notesp. 47
Referencesp. 50
Generalizations in Navajop. 51
Notesp. 70
Referencesp. 71
Negative Polarity Expressions in Navajop. 73
Referencesp. 90
Word Order in Apache Narrativesp. 92
Referencesp. 99
The Negative/Irrealis Category in Athabaskan-Eyak-Tlingitp. 101
Referencesp. 137
On a Bipartite Model of the Athabaskan Verbp. 139
Bibliographyp. 164
Monadic Verbs and Argument Structure in Ahtna, Slave, and Navajop. 167
Referencesp. 198
The Semantics of the Navajo Verb Basep. 200
Referencesp. 226
Iconicity and Word Order in Koyukon Athabaskanp. 228
Referencesp. 249
Navajo as a Discourse Configurational Languagep. 252
Referencesp. 285
The Function and Signification of Certain Navaho Particlesp. 288
Notesp. 317
Sacred and Secular Issues in Navajo Educationp. 318
Referencep. 323
Subject Indexp. 325
Language Indexp. 331
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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