Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

Colonial women [electronic resource] : race and culture in Stuart drama /
Heidi Hutner.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2001.
description
ix, 141 p.
ISBN
0195141881 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2001.
isbn
0195141881 (Cloth)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Title from e-book title screen (viewed October 16, 2007).
catalogue key
7371278
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 111-130) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2002-04-01:
This is not a book for beginners: to follow its intricate argument, readers should have Shakespeare's Tempest (and John Dryden and William D'Avenant's revision of it, The Enchanted Island), Dryden's Indian Queen and Indian Emperor, and Aphra Behn's Widow Ranter fresh in their heads. Even more requisite is familiarity with a large body of colonialist, gender, and cultural-materialist theorizing, the conclusions of which Hutner (SUNY, Stony Brook) takes as providing established intellectual connections. She finds the same connections embodied in the plays' mappings of imperialism onto the female body, especially the racialized female body. Hutner is most interesting in treating Behn, the subject of a volume she edited (Rereading Aphra Behn, CH, Mar'94). But only readers who share the author's manifold assumptions--and in particular who share the currently popular view of Shakespeare's Tempest as a parable of colonial dominion--will be able to make full use of this book. Graduate and research collections. D. L. Patey Smith College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"[Hutner] provides suggestive readings of various Tempest adaptations [and] adds new insights into that increasingly significant text [The Widow Ranter].... Hutner's sometimes passionate, often informed readings point the way toward the necessary rereading of seventeenth- (and eighteenth-) century plays in order to decode the contemporary reading of colonial America."--Early American Literature
"[Hutner] provides suggestive readings of various Tempest adaptations [and] adds new insights into that increasingly significant text [The Widow Ranter].... Hutner's sometimes passionate, often informed readings point the way toward the necessary rereading of seventeenth- (and eighteenth-)century plays in order to decode the contemporary reading of colonial America."--Early American Literature
"[Hutner] provides suggestive readings of various Tempest adaptations[and] adds new insights into that increasingly significant text [The WidowRanter].... Hutner's sometimes passionate, often informed readings point the waytoward the necessary rereading of seventeenth- (and eighteenth-) century playsin order to decode the contemporary reading of colonial America."--EarlyAmerican Literature
"[Hutner] provides suggestive readings of various Tempest adaptations [and] adds new insights into that increasingly significant text [ The Widow Ranter ].... Hutner's sometimes passionate, often informed readings point the way toward the necessary rereading of seventeenth- (and eighteenth-) century plays in order to decode the contemporary reading of colonial America."-- Early American Literature
"[Hutner] provides suggestive readings of variousTempestadaptations [and] adds new insights into that increasingly significant text [The Widow Ranter].... Hutner's sometimes passionate, often informed readings point the way toward the necessary rereading of seventeenth- (and eighteenth-) century plays in order to decode the contemporary reading of colonial America."--Early American Literature
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, April 2002
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Focusing on gender and race in Stuart drama, Heidi Hutner argues that in such drama, as in historical accounts, the symbol of the native woman is used to justify and promote the exploitation of the New World and its inhabitants.
Long Description
Colonial Women examines the women-as-land metaphor in English colonial dramatic literature of the seventeenth century, and looks closely at the myths of two historical native female figures--Pocahontas of Virginia and Malinche of Mexico--to demonstrate how these two stories are crucial to constructions of gender, race, and English nationhood in the drama and culture of the period. Heidi Hutner's interpretations of the figure of the native woman in the plays of Shakespeare, Fletcher, Davenant, Dryden, and Behn reveal how the English patriarchal culture of the seventeenth century defined itself through representations of native women and European women who have "gone native." These playwrights use the figure of the native woman as a symbolic means to stabilize the turbulent sociopolitical and religious conflicts in Restoration England under the inclusive ideology of expansion and profit. Colonial Women uncovers the significance of the repeated dramatic spectacle of the native women falling for her European seducer and exploiter, and demonstrates that this image of seduction is motivated by an anxiety-laden movement to reinforce patriarchal authority in seventeenth-century England.
Long Description
Colonial Women is the first comprehensive study to explore the interpenetrating discourses of gender and race in Stuart drama. Analyzing the plays of Shakespeare, Fletcher, Davenant, Dryden, Behn and other playwrights, Heidi Hutner argues that in drama, as in historical accounts, the symbol of the native woman is used to justify and promote the success of the English appropriation, commodification, and exploitation of the New World and its native inhabitants.
Main Description
Colonial Women examines the women-as-land metaphor in English colonial dramatic literature of the seventeenth century, and looks closely at the myths of two historical native female figures--Pocahontas of Virginia and Malinche of Mexico--to demonstrate how these two stories are crucial toconstructions of gender, race, and English nationhood in the drama and culture of the period. Heidi Hutner's interpretations of the figure of the native woman in the plays of Shakespeare, Fletcher, Davenant, Dryden, and Behn reveal how the English patriarchal culture of the seventeenth century defined itself through representations of native women and European women who have "gone native."These playwrights use the figure of the native woman as a symbolic means to stabilize the turbulent sociopolitical and religious conflicts in Restoration England under the inclusive ideology of expansion and profit. Colonial Women uncovers the significance of the repeated dramatic spectacle of thenative women falling for her European seducer and exploiter, and demonstrates that this image of seduction is motivated by an anxiety-laden movement to reinforce patriarchal authority in seventeenth-century England.
Main Description
Colonial Womenexamines the women-as-land metaphor in English colonial dramatic literature of the seventeenth century, and looks closely at the myths of two historical native female figures--Pocahontas of Virginia and Malinche of Mexico--to demonstrate how these two stories are crucial to constructions of gender, race, and English nationhood in the drama and culture of the period. Heidi Hutner's interpretations of the figure of the native woman in the plays of Shakespeare, Fletcher, Davenant, Dryden, and Behn reveal how the English patriarchal culture of the seventeenth century defined itself through representations of native women and European women who have "gone native." These playwrights use the figure of the native woman as a symbolic means to stabilize the turbulent sociopolitical and religious conflicts in Restoration England under the inclusive ideology of expansion and profit.Colonial Womenuncovers the significance of the repeated dramatic spectacle of the native women falling for her European seducer and exploiter, and demonstrates that this image of seduction is motivated by an anxiety-laden movement to reinforce patriarchal authority in seventeenth-century England.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Colonial Womenp. 2
Introduction Colonial Women and Stuart Dramap. 3
The Tempest, the Sea Voyage, and the Pocahontas Mythp. 21
Restoration Revisions of the Tempestp. 45
The Indian Queen and the Indian Emperourp. 65
Aphra Behn's the Widow Ranterp. 89
Afterwordp. 107
Notesp. 111
Indexp. 131
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem