Catalogue

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The Apocalyptic year 1000 [electronic resource] : religious expectation and social change, 950-1050 /
edited by Richard Landes, Andrew Gow, David C. Van Meter.
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2003.
description
xiv, 360 p.
ISBN
0195111915 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2003.
isbn
0195111915 (Cloth)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Title from e-book title screen (viewed October 15, 2007).
catalogue key
7371178
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2004-03-01:
Nineteenth-century historians popularized the notion that as the end of the first millennium approached, Western European Christians were terrified of the imminent end of the world. Even when nothing happened at the stroke of midnight, the popular ethos was still so charged that preachers for generations could still evoke fear and call for repentance. Eventually all of this millennium spirit would lead to Joachim of Fiore and his elaborate theology of history. To confound such a fanciful and overwrought picture of the 10th and 11th century apocalyptic, 20th-century historians rejected the earlier descriptions, many even asserting that the millennium was barely noticed by contemporaries. This collection, by international scholars of many different fields, is the product of a 1996 conference on the theme, and it corrects simplistic enthusiasts of all stripes--contemporaries knew about the millennium but were not frozen with fear because of it. In the future, no one will be able to teach a course on the millennium without this as a text. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. D. A. Brown emeritus, California State University, Fullerton
Reviews
Review Quotes
"The collection is a first-rate guide to the state of the question and would well suit undergraduate and graduate courses on historiography and methodology." -- Catholic Historical Review
"The collection is a first-rate guide to the state of the question and would well suit undergraduate and graduate courses on historiography and methodology." --Catholic Historical Review
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
The essays in this volume challenge prevailing views on the way in which apocalyptic concerns contributed to larger processes of social change at the first millennium. They should provoke new interest in and debate on the nature and causes of social change in early medieval Europe.
Long Description
The essays in this book challenge prevailing views on the way in which apocalyptic concerns contributed to larger processes of social change at the first millennium. Several basic questions unify the essays: What chronological and theological assumptions underlay apocalyptic and millennial speculations around the Year 1000? How broadly disseminated were those speculations? Can we speak of a mentality of apocalyptic hopes and anxieties on the eve of the millennium? If so, how did authorities respond to or even contribute to the formation of this mentality? What were the social ramifications of apocalyptic hopes and anxieties, and of any efforts to suppress or redirect the more radical impulses that bred them? How did contemporaries conceptualize and then historicize the passing of the millennial date of 1000? Including the work of British, French, German, Dutch, and American scholars, this book will be the definitive resource on this fascinating topic, and should at the same time provoke new interest in and debate on the nature and causes of social change in early medieval Europe.
Main Description
The essays in this book challenge prevailing views on the way in which apocalyptic concerns contributed to larger processes of social change at the first millennium. Several basic questions unify the essays: What chronological and theological assumptions underlay apocalyptic and millennialspeculations around the Year 1000? How broadly disseminated were those speculations? Can we speak of a mentality of apocalyptic hopes and anxieties on the eve of the millennium? If so, how did authorities respond to or even contribute to the formation of this mentality? What were the socialramifications of apocalyptic hopes and anxieties, and of any efforts to suppress or redirect the more radical impulses that bred them? How did contemporaries conceptualize and then historicize the passing of the millennial date of 1000? Including the work of British, French, German, Dutch, andAmerican scholars, this book will be the definitive resource on this fascinating topic, and should at the same time provoke new interest in and debate on the nature and causes of social change in early medieval Europe.
Table of Contents
Preface: The "terrors" of the Year 1000: Une Question Mal Poséep. v
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Abbreviationsp. xv
The Apocalyptic Year 1000p. 1
Introduction The Terribles Espoirs of 1000 and the Tacit Fears of 2000p. 3
Notesp. 11
Awaiting the End of Time Around the Turn of the Year 1000p. 17
The Apocalyptic Year 1000 in Medieval Thoughtp. 65
Stalking the Signs: the Apocalyptic Commentariesp. 67
Notesp. 78
Adso of Montier-En-Der and the Fear of the Year 1000p. 81
Notesp. 89
Thietland's Commentary on Second Thessalonians: Digressions on the Antichrist and the End of the Millenniump. 93
Notesp. 102
Avarice and the Apocalypsep. 109
Notesp. 116
Waiting for the Millenniump. 121
The Apocalyptic Year 1000 in Medieval Art and Literaturep. 137
Apocalypse and Last Judgment Around the Year 1000p. 139
Appendix: The Text of Andrew of Fleuryp. 152
Notesp. 153
The Millennium, Time, and History for the Anglo-Saxonsp. 155
Notesp. 177
The Cult of St. Michael the Archangel and the "terrors of the Year 1000"p. 181
Notesp. 193
Eschatology, Millenarian Apocalypticism, and the Liturgical Anti-Judaism of the Medieval Prophet Playsp. 205
Notesp. 220
Visualizing the Millennium: Eschatological Rhetoric for the Ottonian Courtp. 231
Notesp. 239
Historiography of the Apocalyptic Year 1000p. 242
The Fear of an Apocalyptic Year 1000: Augustinian Historiography, Medieval and Modernp. 243
Notesp. 260
Eschatological Imagination and the Program of Roman Imperial and Ecclesiastical Renewal at the End of the Tenth Centuryp. 271
Notesp. 283
Satan's Bonds Are Extremely Loose: Apocalyptic Expectation in Anglo-Saxon England During the Millennial Erap. 289
Notesp. 303
Apocalyptic Moments and the Eschatological Rhetoric of Reform in the Early Eleventh Century: the Case of the Visionary of St. Vaastp. 311
Notesp. 321
Tools and Sourcesp. 328
The Astronomical Situation Around the Year 1000p. 329
Notesp. 334
Selected Documents on Eschatological Expectations and Social Change Around the Year 1000p. 337
Notesp. 346
Indexp. 347
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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