Catalogue


Jewels of authority [electronic resource] : women and textual tradition in Hindu India /
edited by Laurie L. Patton.
imprint
New York ; Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2002.
description
xxii, 228 p.
ISBN
0195134788 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York ; Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2002.
isbn
0195134788 (Cloth)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Title from e-book title screen (viewed October 15, 2007).
catalogue key
7370962
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2002-10-01:
As Patton (Emory Univ.) notes in her introduction, much work on a general level has been done in recent years on women and the Hindu tradition. The singular achievement of this collection--and it is truly groundbreaking--is its focus on quite specific intellectual, spiritual, and ritual contexts in order to examine the status of women in the history of Hinduism. Such a project, addressed variously in the nine essays of the volume, necessarily includes an examination of the structures, mechanisms, and debates of Brahmin male authority and the challenges to its exclusivist tendencies, both by male and female interlocutors. The book is unique in many ways. The scholars are all women, all are experts in Sanskrit or regional languages in India, all are trained in the most modern research methodologies, and all are theoretically astute, with penetrating feminist and critical analysis. The book contains three essays each for three periods in Indian religious history--ancient, classical, and modern--and surveys a variety of texts and traditions, all of which offer much more nuance to the "status of women" in the history of Hinduism than perhaps was seen in the first wave of scholarship in gender studies in India. Highly recommended for upper-division undergraduates through faculty. T. A. Forsthoefel Mercyhurst College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Laurie Patton has brought together a fascinating array of essays, a veritable collection of gems... The conscious decision to link textual traditions and ethnographic analysis makes this rich collection of interdisciplinary and multi-lingual scholarship, which takes the 'conversation', not only among North American scholars, much beyond the level of simple binary oppositions."-- South Asia Research "A well-conceived, well-executed, and judicious consideration of this extraordinary encounter of two worlds, and the ultimate, apparent triumph of Christianity."-- Catholic Southwest "The singular achievement of this collection--and it is truly groundbreaking--is its focus on quite specific intellectual, spiritual, and ritual contexts in order to examine the status of women in the history of Hinduism. . . . The book is unique in many ways. The scholars are all women, all are experts in Sanskrit or regional languages in India, all are trained in the most modern research methodologies, and all are theoretically astute, with penetrating feminist and critical analysis."-- Choice
"Laurie Patton has brought together a fascinating array of essays, a veritable collection of gems... The conscious decision to link textual traditions and ethnographic analysis makes this rich collection of interdisciplinary and multi-lingual scholarship, which takes the 'conversation', not only among North American scholars, much beyond the level of simple binary oppositions."--South Asia Research "A well-conceived, well-executed, and judicious consideration of this extraordinary encounter of two worlds, and the ultimate, apparent triumph of Christianity."--Catholic Southwest "The singular achievement of this collection--and it is truly groundbreaking--is its focus on quite specific intellectual, spiritual, and ritual contexts in order to examine the status of women in the history of Hinduism. . . . The book is unique in many ways. The scholars are all women, all are experts in Sanskrit or regional languages in India, all are trained in the most modern research methodologies, and all are theoretically astute, with penetrating feminist and critical analysis."--Choice
The book is unique in many ways. The scholars are all women, all are experts in Sanskrit or regional languages in India, all are trained in the most modern research methodologies, and all are theoretically astute, with penetrating feminist and critical analysis ... Highly recommended.
The singular achievement of this collection - and it is truly groundbreaking - is its focus on quite specific intellectual, spiritual, and ritual contexts in order to examine the status of women in the history of Hinduism.
"The singular achievement of this collection--and it is truly groundbreaking--is its focus on quite specific intellectual, spiritual, and ritual contexts in order to examine the status of women in the history of Hinduism. . . . The book is unique in many ways. The scholars are all women, all are experts in Sanskrit or regional languages in India, all are trained in the most modern research methodologies, and all are theoretically astute, with penetrating feminist and critical analysis."--Choice
"The singular achievement of this collection--and it is truly groundbreaking--is its focus on quite specific intellectual, spiritual, and ritual contexts in order to examine the status of women in the history of Hinduism. . . . The book is unique in many ways. The scholars are all women, allare experts in Sanskrit or regional languages in India, all are trained in the most modern research methodologies, and all are theoretically astute, with penetrating feminist and critical analysis."--Choice
"The singular achievement of this collection--and it is trulygroundbreaking--is its focus on quite specific intellectual, spiritual, andritual contexts in order to examine the status of women in the history ofHinduism. . . . The book is unique in many ways. The scholars are all women, allare experts in Sanskrit or regional languages in India, all are trained in themost modern research methodologies, and all are theoretically astute, withpenetrating feminist and critical analysis."--Choice
Contributors Abbreviations Laurie L. Patton: Introduction Part II. Ancient Arguments 1. Ellison Banks Findly: The Housemistress at the Door: Vedic and Buddhist Perspectives on the Mendicant Encounter 2. Mary McGee: Ritual Rights: The Gender Implications of Adhikara 3. Laurie L. Patton: Mantras and Miscarriage: Controlling Birth in the Late Vedic Period Part II. Classical Arguments 4. Stephanie W. Jamison: Giver or Given? Some Marriages in Kalidasa 5. Katherine K. Young: Om, the Vedas, and the Status of Women with Special Reference to Srivaisnavism 6. Vasudha Narayanan: Casting Light on the Sounds of the Tamil Veda: Tirukkoneri Dasyai's "Garland of Words" Part III. Reform and Comtemporary Arguments 7. Nancy Auer Falk: By What Authority? Hindu Women and the Legitimization of Reform in the Nineteenth Century 8. Paola Bacchetta: Hindu Nationalist Women: On the Use of the Feminine Symbolic to (Temporarily) Displace Male Authority 9. Ann Grodzins Gold: Counterpoint Authority in Women's Ritual Expressions: A View from the Village Laurie L. Patton: Afterword Bibliography Index
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 2002
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
The contributors to this volume believe that sophisticated studies at higher levels of theoretical analysis are needed on the religious experiences of women and the denial or granting of religious and spiritual authority to such women in India.
Long Description
Recent years have seen an explosion in the scholarship on the religious experiences of women. The contributors to this volume believe that more sophisticated studies at higher levels of theoretical analysis are now needed. Their essays involve the close reading of situations in which women are given or denied authority in ritual and interpretive situations. This approach involves not only how women are represented by Indian texts, but several other perspectives: how the particular strategies of debate about women are carried on, how women are depicted as negotiating certain kinds of authority, and how women might resist particular kings of traditional authority in certain colonial and post-colonial situations. Including new work by such scholars as Stephanie Jamison, Vasudha Narayanan, and Ann Grozdins Gold, this collection will set a new benchmark for feminist studies of Hinduism.
Long Description
Recent years have seen an explosion in the scholarship on the religious experiences of women. The contributors to this volume believe that more sophisticated studies at higher levels of theoretical analysis are now needed. Their essays involve the close reading of situations in which women are given or denied authority in ritual and interpretive situations. This approach involves not only how women are represented by Indian texts, but several other perspectives: how theparticular strategies of debate about women are carried on, how women are depicted as negotiating certain kinds of authority, and how women might resist particular kings of traditional authority in certain colonial and post-colonial situations. Including new work by such scholars as Stephanie Jamison,Vasudha Narayanan, and Ann Grozdins Gold, this collection will set a new benchmark for feminist studies of Hinduism.
Long Description
The essays in this collection address the problem of Hindu women's relationship to authority, both within and without the textual traditions of Sanskrit, Tamil, Hindi, and English. The authors adopt a method of close textual and ethnographic reading, which results in some surprisingly new and subtle ways of interpreting older, more "classical" discourses, such as Veda and Mimamsa, as well as newer discourses, such as the RSS use of the Devimahatmya.
Main Description
The essays in this collection address the problem of Hindu women's relationship to authority, both within and without the textual traditions of Sanskrit, Tamil, Hindi, and English. The authors adopt a method of close textual and ethnographic reading, which results in some surprisingly new andsubtle ways of interpreting older, more "classical" discourses, such as Veda and Mimamsa, as well as newer discourses, such as the RSS use of the Devimahatmya.
Main Description
These essays address the problem of Hindu women's relationship to authority, both within and without the textual traditions of Sanskrit, Tamil, Hindi, and English. The authors offer some surprising new and subtle ways of interpreting Hindu discourses.
Table of Contents
Contributors
Abbreviations
Introduction
Ancient Arguments
The Housemistress at the Door: Vedic and Buddhist Perspectives on the Mendicant Encounter
Ritual Rights: The Gender Implications of Adhikara
Mantras and Miscarriage: Controlling Birth in the Late Vedic Period
Classical Arguments
Giver or Given? Some Marriages in Kalidasa
Om the Vedas and the Status of Women with Special Reference to Srivaisnavism
Casting Light on the Sounds of the Tamil Veda: Tirukkoneri Dasyai's "Garland of Words"
Reform and Contemporary Arguments
By What Authority? Hindu Women and the Legitimization of Reform in the Nineteenth Century
Hindu Nationalist Women: On the Use of the Feminine Symbolic to (Temporarily) Displace Male Authority
Counterpoint Authority in Women's Ritual Expressions: A View from the Village
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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