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French peasant fascism [electronic resource] : Henry Dorgère's Greenshirts and the crises of French agriculture, 1929-1939 /
Robert O. Paxton.
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1997.
description
xii, 244 p.
ISBN
0195111893 (Paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1997.
isbn
0195111893 (Paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Title from e-book title screen (viewed October 16, 2007).
catalogue key
7370792
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 187-233) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Robert O. Paxton is Professor of History at Columbia University. He has also taught at the University of California at Berkeley and the State University of New York at Stony Brook
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Once again, Robert Paxton has done pioneering work."--Foreign Affairs
"Once again, Robert Paxton has done pioneering work."--ForeignAffairs
"This is a finely crafted piece of historical research." --Times Literary Supplement
"This is a finely crafted piece of historical research." --Times LiterarySupplement
"Thoughtful, reflective, sensitive to nuances, Paxton squeezes all possible information from his sources. Specialists will not want to miss his book. Nonspecialists should at least read the first chapter...and the last chapter....If they are not then moved to read the rest, they will at leasthave observed a first-rate mind at work."--The York Times Book Review
"Thoughtful, reflective, sensitive to nuances, Paxton squeezes allpossible information from his sources. Specialists will not want to miss hisbook. Nonspecialists should at least read the first chapter...and the lastchapter....If they are not then moved to read the rest, they will at least haveobserved a first-rate mind at work."--The York Times Book Review
"Thoughtful, reflective, sensitive to nuances, Paxton squeezes all possible information from his sources. Specialists will not want to miss his book. Nonspecialists should at least read the first chapter...and the last chapter....If they are not then moved to read the rest, they will at least have observed a first-rate mind at work."-- The York Times Book Review "Once again, Robert Paxton has done pioneering work."-- Foreign Affairs "This is a finely crafted piece of historical research." -- Times Literary Supplement
"Thoughtful, reflective, sensitive to nuances, Paxton squeezes all possible information from his sources. Specialists will not want to miss his book. Nonspecialists should at least read the first chapter...and the last chapter....If they are not then moved to read the rest, they will at least have observed a first-rate mind at work."--The York Times Book Review "Once again, Robert Paxton has done pioneering work."--Foreign Affairs "This is a finely crafted piece of historical research." --Times Literary Supplement
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
French Peasant Fascism is the first account of the Greenshirts, a militant right-wing peasant movement in 1930s France that sought to transform the Republic into an authoritarian, agrarian state. Author Robert Paxton examines the Greenshirts in five case studies, throwing new light on French rural society and institutions during the Depression and on the emergence of a new rural leadership of authentic farmers. Paxton points out that fascism remained weak in the Frenchcountryside because the French state protected landowners more effectively than did those of Weimar Germany and Italy, and because French rural notables were so firmly embedded in social and economic power.Although the Greenshirts disappeared with the Third Republic, they left a double legacy: a tradition of peasant direct action, which is still exercised today; and the idea of France as a peasant nation, whose identity and virtues rest upon the persistence of a large peasant sector. That self-image continues to influence French policy choices today, long after the social structure on which it rested has disappeared.
Main Description
All previous assessments of French fascism have limited themselves tourban intellectuals, a curious omission since it was in the countryside thatfascism made its first decisive breakthroughs in Germany and Italy. FrenchPeasant Fascism is the first account of the Greenshirts, a militant right-wingpeasant movement in 1930s France that sought to transform the Republic into anauthoritarian, agrarian state. Author Robert Paxton examines the Greenshirts infive case studies that throw new light on French rural society and institutionsduring the Depression, and on the emergence of a new rural leadership ofauthentic farmers. Fascism remained weak in the French countryside, however,because the French state protected landowners more effectively than did those ofWeimar Germany and Italy, and because French rural notables were so firmlyembedded in social and economic power.The Greenshirts disappeared with the Third Republic, but they left a doublelegacy: a tradition of peasant direct action, which is still exercised today;and the idea of France as a peasant nation, whose identity and virtues rest uponthe persistence of a large peasant sector. That self-image continues toinfluence French policy choices today, long after the social structure on whichit rested has disappeared.
Main Description
French Peasant Fascism is the first account of the Greenshirts, a militant right-wing peasant movement in 1930s France that sought to transform the Republic into an authoritarian, agrarian state. Author Robert Paxton examines the Greenshirts in five case studies, throwing new light on Frenchrural society and institutions during the Depression and on the emergence of a new rural leadership of authentic farmers. Paxton points out that fascism remained weak in the French countryside because the French state protected landowners more effectively than did those of Weimar Germany and Italy,and because French rural notables were so firmly embedded in social and economic power. Although the Greenshirts disappeared with the Third Republic, they left a double legacy: a tradition of peasant direct action, which is still exercised today; and the idea of France as a peasant nation, whose identity and virtues rest upon the persistence of a large peasant sector. That self-imagecontinues to influence French policy choices today, long after the social structure on which it rested has disappeared.
Main Description
French Peasant Fascism is the first account of the Greenshirts, a militant right-wing peasant movement in 1930s France that sought to transform the Republic into an authoritarian, agrarian state. Author Robert Paxton examines the Greenshirts in five case studies, throwing new light on French rural society and institutions during the Depression and on the emergence of a new rural leadership of authentic farmers. Paxton points out that fascism remained weak in the French countryside because the French state protected landowners more effectively than did those of Weimar Germany and Italy, and because French rural notables were so firmly embedded in social and economic power. Although the Greenshirts disappeared with the Third Republic, they left a double legacy: a tradition of peasant direct action, which is still exercised today; and the idea of France as a peasant nation, whose identity and virtues rest upon the persistence of a large peasant sector. That self-image continues to influence French policy choices today, long after the social structure on which it rested has disappeared.
Main Description
This illuminating study of the Greenshirts, a militant right-wing peasant movement in 1930s France, throws new light on French rural society and institutions during the Depression, and on France's legacy of peasant direct action.
Table of Contents
Abbreviationsp. xi
Introductionp. 3
In Search of Henry Dorgeresp. 3
The Triple Crisis of the French Peasantry, 1929-39p. 11
The Depressionp. 12
A Vanishing Way of Lifep. 27
A Crisis of Representationp. 36
The Rise of Dorgerismp. 51
The Creation of Henry Dorgeresp. 51
Dorgeres and the Agrarian Pressp. 54
Dorgeres, the Peasant Tribunep. 57
Dorgeres against the Republicp. 61
Five Scenarios of Peasant Actionp. 69
Giving the Peasants a Voice: The Market-day Rallyp. 70
Pushing Back the State: The Battle of Bray-sur-Somme, 18 June 1933p. 78
Pushing Back the Redsp. 84
Breaking Industrial Strikes: Isigny (Calvados), August-December 1936p. 102
Organizing the Market: Le Petrolage des Petits Pois, Finistere, June 1938p. 110
Dorgeres, the Agrarian Elite, and the State, 1934-44p. 119
Dorgerism, 1934-40: Who, Where, and How Many?p. 120
The Peasant Frontp. 129
Where Did the Money Come From?p. 134
The Republic against Dorgeresp. 135
The Notables Drop Dorgeresp. 138
Triumph and Disappointment: Dorgeres at Vichyp. 142
Aftermath, Legacy, Meaningsp. 151
Dorgeres after the Warp. 151
A Village Fascism?p. 154
The Dorgerist Momentp. 165
France as a Peasant Nationp. 174
Notesp. 187
Bibliographical Essayp. 227
Indexp. 235
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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