Catalogue


Reimagining Indians [electronic resource] : Native Americans through Anglo eyes, 1880-1940 /
Sherry L. Smith.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University, 2000.
description
ix, 273 p. : ill.
ISBN
0195136357 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University, 2000.
isbn
0195136357 (Cloth)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Title from e-book title screen (viewed October 16, 2007).
catalogue key
7370633
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Sherry L. Smith is Professor of History at the Southern Methodist University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"An eloquent and nuanced book. A very readable and enjoyable book that serves as an important chapter in the history of white-Indian relations and deserves wide readership." - -Pacific Historical Review
"An eloquent and nuanced book. A very readable and enjoyable book thatserves as an important chapter in the history of white-Indian relations anddeserves wide readership." - -Pacific Historical Review
"Her book is well documented and thorough. Her assesments are careful and thoughtful. Most of all, she counters the still-prevailing view that Indian reformer John Collier single-handedly redefinded the image of Indians and instituted the Indian New Deal. Correcting that idea alone makesthe book worthwhile." - - Journal of Arizona Hstory
"Her book is well documented and thorough. Her assesments are careful andthoughtful. Most of all, she counters the still-prevailing view that Indianreformer John Collier single-handedly redefinded the image of Indians andinstituted the Indian New Deal. Correcting that idea alone makes the bookworthwhile." - - Journal of Arizona Hstory
"In looking again at images of Indians, Sherry Smith breaks down stereotypes about the people who held and created images of the American West and its peoples for an essentially eastern audience. As in the writings of earlier European authors, positive statements about Indian life and cultureoften revealed underlying or open dissatisfaction with one's own society rather than an accurate record of Indian life. But Smith demonstrates how these writers, for all their blindspots, prejudices, and shortcomings as cultural interpreters, created an image of Indians as human beings, somethingbadly lacking from earlier portrayals. These writers exerted influence on federal Indian policy, paving the way for the more pluralistic view, especially in the years when John Collier was formulating radical changes in national Indian affairs."--Colin G. Calloway, Dartmouth College
"In looking again at images of Indians, Sherry Smith breaks downstereotypes about the people who held and created images of the American Westand its peoples for an essentially eastern audience. As in the writings ofearlier European authors, positive statements about Indian life and cultureoften revealed underlying or open dissatisfaction with one's own society ratherthan an accurate record of Indian life. But Smith demonstrates how thesewriters, for all their blindspots, prejudices, and shortcomings as culturalinterpreters, created an image of Indians as human beings, something badlylacking from earlier portrayals. These writers exerted influence on federalIndian policy, paving the way for the more pluralistic view, especially in theyears when John Collier was formulating radical changes in national Indianaffairs."--Colin G. Calloway, Dartmouth College
"In looking again at images of Indians, Sherry Smith breaks down stereotypes about the people who held and created images of the American West and its peoples for an essentially eastern audience. As in the writings of earlier European authors, positive statements about Indian life and culture often revealed underlying or open dissatisfaction with one's own society rather than an accurate record of Indian life. But Smith demonstrates how these writers, for all their blindspots, prejudices, and shortcomings as cultural interpreters, created an image of Indians as human beings, something badly lacking from earlier portrayals. These writers exerted influence on federal Indian policy, paving the way for the more pluralistic view, especially in the years when John Collier was formulating radical changes in national Indian affairs."--Colin G. Calloway, Dartmouth College "Sherry Smith, a wonderfully versatile historian, now leads us into the lives and minds of nine men and women driven to understand, and sometimes to speak for, Indian peoples. Their visions--part insight and admiration, part fantasy and delusion--said as much about white as about Native America. It's a fascinating story told always with compassion and an exceptionally illuminating intelligence."--Elliott West, University of Arkansas "Something happened in America in the century between the Wounded Knee massacre and the premier of 'Dances with Wolves.' The American public finally learned that the old language of 'savagery' did not describe Native American cultures and popular attitudes towards Indians gradually shifted from hostility to admiration. Sherry Smith's fascinating portrait of these men and women who were captivated by Indian culture helps us understand this dramatic reversal of outlook. Often perceived as misfits in their day, these writers and activists pushed their fellow countrymen to cast aside prejudice and ignorance and move closer to their own emerging vision of a plural nation capable of learning from the Native American past. This is a great story."--Frederick E. Hoxie, University of Illinois, Urbana/Champaign "Sherry Smith brings to life a remarkable group of writers, travelers, and cultural explainers bent on fashioning a new, positive image of Native Americans. Rescuing what she calls 'middle-brow purveyors of Indianness' from obscurity, Smith provides a sympathetic yet critical reading of cultural interpreters as diverse as George Wharton James, Anna Ickes, and Frank Bird Linderman. Smith's book is a revelation, one that acknowledges the enduring influence of those Anglo image-makers while revealing the complexities and contradictions when one culture attempts to portray another. Reimaging Indians is one of those rare books sure to enjoy a wide audience both professional and popular."--James P. Ronda, University of Tulsa
"In looking again at images of Indians, Sherry Smith breaks down stereotypes about the people who held and created images of the American West and its peoples for an essentially eastern audience. As in the writings of earlier European authors, positive statements about Indian life and culture often revealed underlying or open dissatisfaction with one's own society rather than an accurate record of Indian life. But Smith demonstrates how these writers, for all their blindspots, prejudices, and shortcomings as cultural interpreters, created an image of Indians as human beings, something badly lacking from earlier portrayals. These writers exerted influence on federal Indian policy, paving the way for the more pluralistic view, especially in the years when John Collier was formulating radical changes in national Indian affairs."--Colin G. Calloway, Dartmouth College "Sherry Smith, a wonderfully versatile historian, now leads us into the lives and minds of nine men and women driven to understand, and sometimes to speak for, Indian peoples. Their visions--part insight and admiration, part fantasy and delusion--said as much about white as about Native America. It's a fascinating story told always with compassion and an exceptionally illuminating intelligence."--Elliott West, University of Arkansas "Something happened in America in the century between the Wounded Knee massacre and the premier of 'Dances with Wolves.' The American public finally learned that the old language of 'savagery' did not describe Native American cultures and popular attitudes towards Indians gradually shifted from hostility to admiration. Sherry Smith's fascinating portrait of these men and women who were captivated by Indian culture helps us understand this dramatic reversal of outlook. Often perceived as misfits in their day, these writers and activists pushed their fellow countrymen to cast aside prejudice and ignorance and move closer to their own emerging vision of a plural nation capable of learning from the Native American past. This is a great story."--Frederick E. Hoxie, University of Illinois, Urbana/Champaign "Sherry Smith brings to life a remarkable group of writers, travelers, and cultural explainers bent on fashioning a new, positive image of Native Americans. Rescuing what she calls 'middle-brow purveyors of Indianness' from obscurity, Smith provides a sympathetic yet critical reading of cultural interpreters as diverse as George Wharton James, Anna Ickes, and Frank Bird Linderman. Smith's book is a revelation, one that acknowledges the enduring influence of those Anglo image-makers while revealing the complexities and contradictions when one culture attempts to portray another.ReimagingIndiansis one of those rare books sure to enjoy a wide audience both professional and popular."--James P. Ronda, University of Tulsa
"Sherry Smith, a wonderfully versatile historian, now leads us into the lives and minds of nine men and women driven to understand, and sometimes to speak for, Indian peoples. Their visions--part insight and admiration, part fantasy and delusion--said as much about white as about NativeAmerica. It's a fascinating story told always with compassion and an exceptionally illuminating intelligence."--Elliott West, University of Arkansas
"Sherry Smith, a wonderfully versatile historian, now leads us into thelives and minds of nine men and women driven to understand, and sometimes tospeak for, Indian peoples. Their visions--part insight and admiration, partfantasy and delusion--said as much about white as about Native America. It's afascinating story told always with compassion and an exceptionally illuminatingintelligence."--Elliott West, University of Arkansas
"Sherry Smith brings to life a remarkable group of writers, travelers, and cultural explainers bent on fashioning a new, positive image of Native Americans. Rescuing what she calls 'middle-brow purveyors of Indianness' from obscurity, Smith provides a sympathetic yet critical reading ofcultural interpreters as diverse as George Wharton James, Anna Ickes, and Frank Bird Linderman. Smith's book is a revelation, one that acknowledges the enduring influence of those Anglo image-makers while revealing the complexities and contradictions when one culture attempts to portray another.Reimaging Indians is one of those rare books sure to enjoy a wide audience both professional and popular."--James P. Ronda, University of Tulsa
"Sherry Smith brings to life a remarkable group of writers, travelers, andcultural explainers bent on fashioning a new, positive image of NativeAmericans. Rescuing what she calls 'middle-brow purveyors of Indianness' fromobscurity, Smith provides a sympathetic yet critical reading of culturalinterpreters as diverse as George Wharton James, Anna Ickes, and Frank BirdLinderman. Smith's book is a revelation, one that acknowledges the enduringinfluence of those Anglo image-makers while revealing the complexities andcontradictions when one culture attempts to portray another. Reimaging Indiansis one of those rare books sure to enjoy a wide audience both professional andpopular."--James P. Ronda, University of Tulsa
"Something happened in America in the century between the Wounded Knee massacre and the premier of 'Dances with Wolves.' The American public finally learned that the old language of 'savagery' did not describe Native American cultures and popular attitudes towards Indians gradually shiftedfrom hostility to admiration. Sherry Smith's fascinating portrait of these men and women who were captivated by Indian culture helps us understand this dramatic reversal of outlook. Often perceived as misfits in their day, these writers and activists pushed their fellow countrymen to cast asideprejudice and ignorance and move closer to their own emerging vision of a plural nation capable of learning from the Native American past. This is a great story."--Frederick E. Hoxie, University of Illinois, Urbana/Champaign
"Something happened in America in the century between the Wounded Kneemassacre and the premier of 'Dances with Wolves.' The American public finallylearned that the old language of 'savagery' did not describe Native Americancultures and popular attitudes towards Indians gradually shifted from hostilityto admiration. Sherry Smith's fascinating portrait of these men and women whowere captivated by Indian culture helps us understand this dramatic reversal ofoutlook. Often perceived as misfits in their day, these writers and activistspushed their fellow countrymen to cast aside prejudice and ignorance and movecloser to their own emerging vision of a plural nation capable of learning fromthe Native American past. This is a great story."--Frederick E. Hoxie,University of Illinois, Urbana/Champaign
"Thoroughly researched, skillfully written, and nicely illustrated, this volume is a welcome addition to western literature. Because these ten 'reimaginers' of Indians, whose idiosyncracies are well-documented by Smith, represent such an interesting cross section, this volume will appeal notonly to academicians but to the general reading public."--Western Historical Quarterly
"Thoroughly researched, skillfully written, and nicely illustrated, thisvolume is a welcome addition to western literature. Because these ten'reimaginers' of Indians, whose idiosyncracies are well-documented by Smith,represent such an interesting cross section, this volume will appeal not only toacademicians but to the general reading public."--Western HistoricalQuarterly
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Reimagining Indians investigates an important group of Anglo-American writers whose books about Native Americans helped reshape Americans' understandings and appreciations of Indian peoples at the turn of the 20th century.
Long Description
Reimagining Indians investigates a group of Anglo-American writers whose books about Native Americans helped reshape Americans' understanding of Indian peoples at the turn of the twentieth century. Hailing from the Eastern United States, these men and women traveled to the American West and discovered "exotics" in their midst. Drawn to Indian cultures as alternatives to what they found distasteful about modern American culture, these writers produced a body of workthat celebrates Indian cultures, religions, artistry, and simple humanity. Although these writers were not academically trained ethnographers, their books represent popular versions of ethnography. In revealing their own doubts about the superiority of European-American culture, they sought to provide a favorable climate for Indian cultural survival in a world indisputably dominated by non-Indians. They also encouraged notions of cultural relativism, pluralism, and tolerance in American thought. For the historian and general reader alike, this volume speaks tobroad themes of American cultural history, Native American history, and the history of the American West.
Main Description
Reimagining Indians investigates a group of Anglo-American writers whose books about Native Americans helped reshape Americans' understanding of Indian peoples at the turn of the twentieth century. Hailing from the Eastern United States, these men and women traveled to the American West anddiscovered "exotics" in their midst. Drawn to Indian cultures as alternatives to what they found distasteful about modern American culture, these writers produced a body of work that celebrates Indian cultures, religions, artistry, and simple humanity. Although these writers were not academically trained ethnographers, their books represent popular versions of ethnography. In revealing their own doubts about the superiority of European-American culture, they sought to provide a favorable climate for Indian cultural survival in a worldindisputably dominated by non-Indians. They also encouraged notions of cultural relativism, pluralism, and tolerance in American thought. For the historian and general reader alike, this volume speaks to broad themes of American cultural history, Native American history, and the history of theAmerican West.
Main Description
Reimagining Indiansinvestigates a group of Anglo-American writers whose books about Native Americans helped reshape Americans' understanding of Indian peoples at the turn of the twentieth century. Hailing from the Eastern United States, these men and women traveled to the American West and discovered "exotics" in their midst. Drawn to Indian cultures as alternatives to what they found distasteful about modern American culture, these writers produced a body of work that celebrates Indian cultures, religions, artistry, and simple humanity. Although these writers were not academically trained ethnographers, their books represent popular versions of ethnography. In revealing their own doubts about the superiority of European-American culture, they sought to provide a favorable climate for Indian cultural survival in a world indisputably dominated by non-Indians. They also encouraged notions of cultural relativism, pluralism, and tolerance in American thought. For the historian and general reader alike, this volume speaks to broad themes of American cultural history, Native American history, and the history of the American West.
Main Description
Reimagining Indians investigates a group of Anglo-American writers whose books about Native Americans helped reshape Americans' understanding of Indian peoples at the turn of the twentieth century. Hailing from the Eastern United States, these men and women traveled to the American West anddiscovered "exotics" in their midst. Drawn to Indian cultures as alternatives to what they found distasteful about modern American culture, these writers produced a body of work that celebrates Indian cultures, religions, artistry, and simple humanity. Although these writers were not academically trained ethnographists, their books represent popular versions of ethnography. In revealing their own doubts about the superiority of European-American culture, they sought to provide a favorable climate for Indian cultural survival in a worldindisputably dominated by non-Indians. They also encouraged notions of cultural relativism, pluralism, and tolerance in American thought. For the historian and general reader alike, this volume speaks to broad themes of American cultural history, Native American history, and the history of theAmerican West.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 3
Eastern Adventurers
From Enemy to Inspiration: Charles Erskine Scott Wood and the Meaning of Indiansp. 21
George Bird Grinnell and the "Vanishing" Plains Indian Culturesp. 45
Among the Blackfeet: Walter McClintock and Mary Roberts Rinehartp. 67
Western Enthusiasts
Native Son: Frank Bird Lindermanp. 95
Charles Fletcher Lummis and the Fight for the Multicultural Southwestp. 119
Out of Arizona: George Wharton Jamesp. 145
Mothers of Reinvention
Sisters of the Southwest: Mary Austin and Anna Ickesp. 165
Mabel Dodge Luhan: Muse of Taosp. 187
Conclusionp. 213
Notesp. 219
Indexp. 257
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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