Catalogue


The diocesan revival in the Church of England, c. 1800-1870 [electronic resource] /
Arthur Burns.
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, c1999.
description
xiv, 344
ISBN
0198207840 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, c1999.
isbn
0198207840 (Cloth)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Title from e-book title screen (viewed October 15, 2007).
catalogue key
7370552
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [276]-322) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'A book that contains a chapter about the revival of rual deans in the nineteenth century might sound almost comically recherche and unhealthily obsessed with the Church as a quirky institution, but Arthur Burns' book is neither, He provides a very clear and illuminating account f htediocesan revival in the nineteenth century which challenges many stereotyped assumptions ... he is unremittingly scholarly and puts the whole question of 'revival' into the context of other stands of British history at that time.' James Garrard, Vision or Revision, Seeing Through the Sacraments, 2000.
A highly significant re-interpretation of nineteenth-century Anglicanism. Burns has carried out formidably detailed and impressive research in initially unprepossessing territory ... He marshals this evidence to show convincingly that during the first two-thirds of the century there was a comprehensive revival and reorganization of diocesan institutions and a renewed clerical and lay consciousness of the diocese as an essential feature of Anglican church order ... His careful and lucid reconstruction of the complicated parliamentary debates and legislation on clerical discipline is a particular tour de force. All this material is set in a stimulating and innovative overall framework ... Burns's meticulous work provides a firm basis in evidence and interpretation for important new directions in the study of nineteenth-century English religion.
'a perceptive account.'Northern History, XXXVIII(I)
Arthur Burns offers a major revision of accepted views of the revival of the Church of England in the period from 1800 to 1870 ... Burns's book is based upon exhaustive research ... and provides a new and significant perspective on the history of the nineteenth-century Church of England, of which all future historians of the period will have to take account.
'Arthur Burns offers a major revision of accepted views of the revival of the Church of England in the period from 1800 to 1870 ... Burns's book is based upon exhaustive research ... and provides a new and significant perspective on the history of the nineteenth-century Church of England, ofwhich all future historians of the period will have to take account.'Peter Davie, Ecclesiastical History, Vol. 52/2, April 2001
... balanced, well argued and incisive study.
Burns has provided a strong case for his argument, and discussions of 'church reform' should not be the same in the future.
Dr Burns had provided an invaluable addition to the revisionist history of nineteenth-century religion, which will be useful reading for all who are interested in why the Church of England is as it is.
'Standard narratives of nineteenth-century English religious history stand in need of substantial revision in light of Arthur Burns's important new study of Anglican ecclesiastical reform during the period. ... The Diocesan Revival is a comprehensive administrative history of the VictorianChurch of England that should be required reading not only for students of religion but also for those of modern British history.'Anglican and Episcopal History
The Diocesan Revival's central thesis persuades not only because of the clarity and vigor with which the author presents his argument but also because of the solid foundation of research upon which the argument is built.
While others before ... have examined the revival of the rural deans, Burns offers the most thorough and compelling case for their centrality to the diocesan revival.
'Standard narratives of nineteenth-century English religious history stand in need of substantial revision in light of Arthur Burns's important new study of Anglican ecclesiastical reform during the period. ... The Diocesan Revival is a comprehensive administrative history of the Victorian Church of England that should be required reading not only for students of religion but also for those of modern British history.'Anglican and Episcopal History'Arthur Burns offers a major revision of accepted views of the revival of the Church of England in the period from 1800 to 1870 ... Burns's book is based upon exhaustive research ... and provides a new and significant perspective on the history of the nineteenth-century Church of England, of which all future historians of the period will have to take account.'Peter Davie, Ecclesiastical History, Vol. 52/2, April 2001'a perceptive account.'Northern History, XXXVIII(I)'A book that contains a chapter about the revival of rual deans in the nineteenth century might sound almost comically recherche and unhealthily obsessed with the Church as a quirky institution, but Arthur Burns' book is neither, He provides a very clear and illuminating account f hte diocesan revival in the nineteenth century which challenges many stereotyped assumptions ... he is unremittingly scholarly and puts the whole question of 'revival' into thecontext of other stands of British history at that time.'James Garrard, Vision or Revision, Seeing Through the Sacraments, 2000.
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Arthur Burns presents an account of a neglected aspect of the history of the 19th-century Church of England: the reform of its diocesan structure.
Long Description
This book provides the first account of an important but neglected aspect of the history of the nineteenth-century Church of England: the reform of its diocesan structures. It illustrates how one of the most important institutions of Victorian England responded at a regional level to the pastoral challenge of a rapidly changing society. Providing a new perspective on the impact of both the Oxford Movement and the Ecclesiastical Commission on the Church, The Diocesan Revival in the Church of England shows that an appreciation of the dynamics of diocesan reform has implications for our understanding of secular as well as ecclesiastical reform in the early nineteenth century.
Main Description
This book provides the first account of an important but neglected aspect of the history of the nineteenth-century Church of England: the reform of its diocesan structure. It illustrates how one of the most important institutions of Victorian England responded at a regional level to the pastoral challenge of a rapidly changing society.
Table of Contents
Oxford Historical Monographsp. i
Acknowledgementsp. vii
List of Abbreviationsp. xiii
Introduction: Identifying the Diocesan Revivalp. 1
The Bishop's Visitationp. 23
Conclusionp. 73
The Bishop's Spectacles: The Revival of the Rural Dean and Ruridecanal Chapterp. 75
Conclusionp. 105
Motivating and Mobilizing: Statistics and Societiesp. 108
Bishop, Cathedral, and Diocese: Some Aspects of the Growth of Diocesan Consciousnessp. 131
Disciplining the Delinquent: Prelate, Peers, or Professionals?p. 162
More Bishops and More Diocesesp. 192
Synods and Conferences: The Revival of Diocesan Assembliesp. 216
Conclusion: Contextualizing the Diocesan Revivalp. 260
Bibliographyp. 276
Indexp. 323
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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