Catalogue


Patent inventions--intellectual property and the Victorian novel [electronic resource] /
Clare Pettitt.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2004.
description
ix, 341 p.
ISBN
019925320X (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2004.
isbn
019925320X (Cloth)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Title from e-book title screen (viewed October 16, 2007).
catalogue key
7370551
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [303]-333) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Breaks new ground in the way in which it moves among literary, manufacturing, and legal issues. It offers an extremely illuminating study of the development of ideas concerning invention and intellectual property in the nineteenth century, and their implications for theories of the literary marketplace, authorship and readership, and individualism."--Studies in English Literature 1500-1900
"Breaks new ground in the way in which it moves among literary, manufacturing, and legal issues. It offers an extremely illuminating study of the development of ideas concerning invention and intellectual property in the nineteenth century, and their implications for theories of the literary marketplace, authorship and readership, and individualism."-- Studies in English Literature 1500-1900
'Historians of copyright will find much food for thought in Pettit's lucid expositions of the novelists' fictionalized relationships with their work and anxieties about its ownership.'Economic History Review
'Historians of copyright will find much food for thought in Pettit's lucidexpositions of the novelists' fictionalized relationships with their work andanxieties about its ownership.'Economic History Review
...it is an extremely inventive book, full of ingenious twists and turns...it is a testament to the book's intellectual ambition that it takes such a playful (occasionally very literal, sometimes exceedingly metaphorical) view of its subject, constantly seeking to test its ingenuity against the work of great authors. Gregory Dart, Times Literary Supplement
1: Introductory. Heroes and Hero-Worship: Inventors and Writers from 1818 to 1900 2. Property in Labour: Inventors and Writers in the 1830s and 1840s 3. The Art of Inventing and the Inventor as Artist: Intellectual Property at the Great Exhibtion 4. 'The spirit of craft and money-making': The Indignities of Literature in the 1850s 5. Women, Risk, and Intellectual Property: Elizabeth Gaskell and George Elliot in the 1860s 6. 'The singing of the wire': Hardy, International Copyright, and the Ether
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This volume suggests that the fierce debates over patent law and the discussion of invention and inventors in popular texts during the 19th century informed the parallel debate over the professional status of authors.
Long Description
Although much has been written about the history of copyright and authorship in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, very little attention has been given to the impact of the development of other kinds of intellectual property on the ways in which writers viewed their work in this period. This book is the first to suggest that the fierce debates over patent law and the discussion of invention and inventors in popular texts during the nineteenth century informed the parallel debate over the professional status of authors. The book examines the shared rhetoric surrounding the creation of the 'inventor' and the 'author' in the debate of the 1830s, and the challenge of the emerging technologies of mass production to traditional ideas of art and industry is addressed in a chapter on authorship at the Great Exhibition of 1851. Subsequent chapters show how novelists Charles Dickens, Elizabeth Gaskell, and George Eliot participated in debates over the value and ownership of labour in the 1850s, such as patent reform and the controversy over married women's property. The book shows the ways in which these were reflected in their novels. It also suggests that the publication of those novels, and the celebrity of their authors, had a substantial effect on the subsequent direction of these debates. The final chapter shows that Thomas Hardy's later fiction reflects an important shift in thinking about creativity and ownership towards the end of the century. Patent Inventions argues that Victorian writers used the novel not just to reflect, but also to challenge received notions of intellectual ownership and responsibility. It ends by suggesting that detailed study of the debate over intellectual property in the nineteenth century leads to a better understanding of the complex negotiations over the bounds of selfhood and social responsibility in the period.
Long Description
This book examines the shared rhetoric surrounding the creation of the "inventor" and the "author" in the 1830s, and the challenge of the emerging technologies of mass production to traditional ideas of art and industry. Patent Inventions argues that Victorian writers used the novel not just to reflect, but also to challenge received notions of intellectual ownership and responsibility, using close readings of work by Dickens, Thackeray, Gaskell, Eliot, and Hardy.
Main Description
Although much has been written about the history of copyright and authorship in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, very little attention has been given to the impact of the development of other kinds of intellectual property on the ways in which writers viewed their work in this period.This book is the first to suggest that the fierce debates over patent law and the discussion of invention and inventors in popular texts during the nineteenth century informed the parallel debate over the professional status of authors. The book examines the shared rhetoric surrounding the creationof the 'inventor' and the 'author' in the debate of the 1830s, and the challenge of the emerging technologies of mass production to traditional ideas of art and industry is addressed in a chapter on authorship at the Great Exhibition of 1851. Subsequent chapters show how novelists Charles Dickens,Elizabeth Gaskell, and George Eliot participated in debates over the value and ownership of labour in the 1850s, such as patent reform and the controversy over married women's property. The book shows the ways in which these were reflected in their novels. It also suggests that the publication ofthose novels, and the celebrity of their authors, had a substantial effect on the subsequent direction of these debates. The final chapter shows that Thomas Hardy's later fiction reflects an important shift in thinking about creativity and ownership towards the end of the century. Patent Inventionsargues that Victorian writers used the novel not just to reflect, but also to challenge received notions of intellectual ownership and responsibility. It ends by suggesting that detailed study of the debate over intellectual property in the nineteenth century leads to a better understanding of thecomplex negotiations over the bounds of selfhood and social responsibility in the period.
Table of Contents
List of Figures
Abbreviations
Introductory. Heroes and Hero-Worship: Inventors and Writers from 1818 to 1900p. 1
Property in Labour: Inventors and Writers in the 1830s and 1840sp. 36
The Art of Inventing and the Inventor as Artist: Intellectual Property at the Great Exhibitionp. 84
The spirit of craft and money-making': The Indignities of Literature in the 1850sp. 149
Women, Risk and Intellectual Property: Elizabeth Gaskell and George Eliot in the 1860sp. 204
'The singing of the wire': Hardy, International Copyright, and the Etherp. 271
Bibliographyp. 303
Indexp. 335
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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