Catalogue


Religious belief and popular culture in Southwark, c.1880-1939 [electronic resource] /
S.C. Williams.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1999.
description
vi, 206 p. : map
ISBN
0198207697 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1999.
isbn
0198207697 (Cloth)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Title from e-book title screen (viewed October 15, 2007).
catalogue key
7370530
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [180]-201) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'measured, lively and well-documented prose ... Written with verve and clarity, and superbly edited ... Williams integrates her interviewees' words well with the large historiography on the subject to offer up a persuasive argument for the ways in which religious belief maintains itself overtime.'C.Brad Faught, SEL, Summer 2000
'provides an impressive account of folk religion, carefully locating formal practice within a wider cultural context. There is much valuable detail here on the persistence of magaic and fatalism'Peter Catterall, Twentieth Century British History, Vol.12, No. 1, 2001
Provides an impressive account of folk religion, carefully locating formal practice within a wider cultural context. There is much valuable detail here on the persistence of magic and fatalism.
'The author places great emphasis on 'oral evidence as a medium through which to examine the dimension of personal religious belief' and gives the reader some wonderful insights into the religious beliefs, or lack thereof, of 'the people'... any church historian will be more than grateful forthe author's skill in giving us such a widely based insight into the people's' uses and understandings of the Christian religion.'Contemporary Review, April 2000
The author writes with notable clarity, tackling a complex subject with subtlety, and making judicious and entertaining use of 29 oral interviews with elderly inhabitants of south London ... Urban historians might well find the account of the Metropolitan Borough of Southwark in the second chapter of especial interest ... Subsequent chapters explore many fascinating issues.
'This book ... goes further than previous accounts by paying serious attention to non-churchgoers.'Frances Knight, Theology, Vol.103, No.814, Jul/Aug 2000.
This book should be read by anyone with an interest in what ordinary people believe. It is relatively short, very readable, yet highly sophisticated in its analyses and its engagement with historiography.
'This book should be read by anyone with an interest in what ordinary people believe. It is relatively short, very readable, yet highly sophisticated in its analyses and its engagement with historiography. The evidence presented rings true; I say that both as a historian, and as thedescendant of a South London family of mainly non-churchgoers.'Frances Knight, Theology, Vol.103, No.814, Jul/Aug 2000.
'This book should be read by anyone with an interest in what 'ordinary people' believe. It is relatively short, very readable, yet highly sophisticated in its analyses and its engagement with historiography.'Theology. Frances Knight.
This is an important book, especially in its determination to treat popular religion as a phenomenon in its own right ... Its picture of a vital, if eclectic, religious dimension to popular culture from within which the people interacted with the Churches largely on their own terms is a convincing one.
'Williams has written an engaging and important book about working class religiosity in London that challenges the secularization thesis.'C.Brad Faught, SEL, summer 2000
'measured, lively and well-documented prose ... Written with verve and clarity, and superbly edited ... Williams integrates her interviewees' words well with the large historiography on the subject to offer up a persuasive argument for the ways in which religious belief maintains itself over time.'C.Brad Faught, SEL, Summer 2000'Williams has written an engaging and important book about working class religiosity in London that challenges the secularization thesis.'C.Brad Faught, SEL, summer 2000'provides an impressive account of folk religion, carefully locating formal practice within a wider cultural context. There is much valuable detail here on the persistence of magaic and fatalism'Peter Catterall, Twentieth Century British History, Vol.12, No. 1, 2001'This book ... goes further than previous accounts by paying serious attention to non-churchgoers.'Frances Knight, Theology, Vol.103, No.814, Jul/Aug 2000.'This book should be read by anyone with an interest in what ordinary people believe. It is relatively short, very readable, yet highly sophisticated in its analyses and its engagement with historiography. The evidence presented rings true; I say that both as a historian, and as the descendant of a South London family of mainly non-churchgoers.'Frances Knight, Theology, Vol.103, No.814, Jul/Aug 2000.'This book should be read by anyone with an interest in what 'ordinary people' believe. It is relatively short, very readable, yet highly sophisticated in its analyses and its engagement with historiography.'Theology. Frances Knight.'The author places great emphasis on 'oral evidence as a medium through which to examine the dimension of personal religious belief' and gives the reader some wonderful insights into the religious beliefs, or lack thereof, of 'the people'... any church historian will be more than grateful for the author's skill in giving us such a widely based insight into the people's' uses and understandings of the Christian religion.'Contemporary Review, April 2000
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text challenges the domination of the institutional church as the overriding concern of 19th-century religious history. It takes as its starting point the nature and expression of religious ideas outside the immediate sphere of the church.
Long Description
This book challenges the domination of the institutional church as the overriding concern of nineteenth-century religious history by taking as its starting point the nature and expression of religious ideas outside the immediate sphere of the church within the wider arena of popular culture. It considers in detail how these beliefs formed part of a richly textured language of personal, familial, and popular identity in the day-to-day lives of the inhabitants of the London Borough of Southwark between c.1880 and the outbreak of the Second World War. The study highlights the persistence of patterns dismissed as alien to the industrial and urban environment. The interaction of folk idioms with institutional religious language and practice is also considered and urban popular religion is identified as a distinctive system of belief in its own right. This study also pioneers a methodology for exploring belief and interpreting it as a popular cultural phenomenon. A wide range of source materials are drawn on including oral history. Centrality is given to understanding the ways in which individuals expressed and communicated their religious ideas.
Long Description
This book considers the religious ideas, attitudes, and values of working people in the London Borough of Southwark between 1880 and 1939. It shows the persistence of folk beliefs usually assumed to have died out in the cities and highlights the importance of religion in the daily life of the community. It illustrates how orthodox and institutional expressions of belief were reinterpreted within local culture to form part of a distinctive pattern of urban popular religious belief.
Main Description
This book challenges the domination of the institutional church as the overriding concern of nineteenth-century religious history by taking as its starting point the nature and expression of religious ideas outside the immediate sphere of the church within the wider arena of popular culture.It considers in detail how these beliefs formed part of a richly textured language of personal, familial, and popular identity in the day-to-day lives of the inhabitants of the London Borough of Southwark between c.1880 and the outbreak of the Second World War. The study highlights the persistenceof patterns dismissed as alien to the industrial and urban environment. The interaction of folk idioms with institutional religious language and practice is also considered and urban popular religion is identified as a distinctive system of belief in its own right. This study also pioneers amethodology for exploring belief and interpreting it as a popular cultural phenomenon. A wide range of source materials are drawn on including oral history. Centrality is given to understanding the ways in which individuals expressed and communicated their religious ideas.
Table of Contents
Religious Belief and Popular Culture
The Metropolitan Borough of Southwark
Urban Folk Religion
Occasional and Conditional Conformity
The Ideal of the True Believer
Religion by Deputy: the Church and the Community
Patterns of Change
Appendix: The Oral Project
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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