Catalogue

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Nationality and citizenship in revolutionary France [electronic resource] : the treatment of foreigners 1789-1799 /
Michael Rapport.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Clarendon, 2000.
description
viii, 382 p.
ISBN
0198208456 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Clarendon, 2000.
isbn
0198208456 (Cloth)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Title from e-book title screen (viewed October 15, 2007).
catalogue key
7370459
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [345]-358) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2001-04-01:
Rapport (Univ. of Stirling) traces the evolution of attitudes and legislation concerning foreigners during the decade of the French Revolution and asks why the libertarian and universalist elements of the revolutionary agenda largely failed. Well written and well organized, the book follows changes in attitudes toward soldiers, clergy, radicals, and business types. Demonstrating how the cosmopolitan rhetoric of the early revolution had shifted generally toward expressions of patriotism and nationalism by the end of the period, Rapport shows that this shift was not just a simple matter of ideology, but reflected contemporary and complex national interests. For instance, while during the years of the Terror "political reliability" became the determining factor in a foreigner's treatment, at other times the need for troops, allies, money, and technology could overrule nationalist or xenophobic tendencies. In spite of these varying attitudes, Rapport finds that many foreigners were well integrated into Revolutionary French society and politics. This book nicely complements the works of Soboul, Mathiez, Arendt, and Wahnich and will be of interest to students of French citizenship and the roots of modern nationalism. Academic collections. M. T. Scholz; Grays Harbor College
Reviews
Review Quotes
'a pragmatic approach to the evolution of policy certainly offers extremely useful insights for historians studying issues of immigration in all eras. Another theme ... which will also be of great interest to historians of later periods, is that of the gradual development of statesurveillance and control of foreigners.'Paul Lawrence, Reviews in History
'a pragmatic approach to the evolution of policy certainly offersextremely useful insights for historians studying issues of immigration in alleras. Another theme ... which will also be of great interest to historians oflater periods, is that of the gradual development of state surveillance andcontrol of foreigners.'Paul Lawrence, Reviews in History
Excellent study of foreign populations in France during the first decade of the Revolution
'excellent study of foreign populations in France during the first decade of the Revolution.'Sixteenth Century Journal XXXII/3
'meticulously researched ... also eminently readable.'Paul Lawrence, Reviews in History
'Michael Rapport has produced an interesting, concise and nuanced work which will be of interest to a wide range of historians.'Paul Lawrence, Reviews in History
'Michael Rapport has produced an interesting, concise and nuanced workwhich will be of interest to a wide range of historians.'Paul Lawrence, Reviews in History
Nationality and Citizenship in Revolutionary France is a fine book that merits space of the shelf of all collections that specialize in the French Revolution or the emergence of the two distinctly related and modern concepts of nationality and citizenship
'Studies of French attitudes towards immigrants have been sparse, for all historical periods. Michael Rapport's excellent new book is thus doubly welcome. In the first instance, it will undoubtedly be of great interest to shcolars of the Revolution. ... However, the book also contains muchof value to those seeking to examine issues of immigrations, national identity, naturalisation and citizenship in later periods.'Paul Lawrence, Reviews in History
'Studies of French attitudes towards immigrants have been sparse, for allhistorical periods. Michael Rapport's excellent new book is thus doublywelcome. In the first instance, it will undoubtedly be of great interest toshcolars of the Revolution. ... However, the book also contains much of value tothose seeking to examine issues of immigrations, national identity,naturalisation and citizenship in later periods.'Paul Lawrence, Reviews in History
... well-researched and cogently argued.
'Well written and well organized ... This book nicely complements the works of Sobul, Mathiez, Arendt, and Wahnich and will be of interest to students of French citizenship and the roots of modern nationalism.'M.T.Scholz, Choice, April 2001
'Well written and well organized ... This book nicely complements theworks of Sobul, Mathiez, Arendt, and Wahnich and will be of interest to studentsof French citizenship and the roots of modern nationalism.'M.T.Scholz, Choice, April 2001
'excellent study of foreign populations in France during the first decade of the Revolution.'Sixteenth Century Journal XXXII/3'Well written and well organized ... This book nicely complements the works of Sobul, Mathiez, Arendt, and Wahnich and will be of interest to students of French citizenship and the roots of modern nationalism.'M.T.Scholz, Choice, April 2001'Studies of French attitudes towards immigrants have been sparse, for all historical periods. Michael Rapport's excellent new book is thus doubly welcome. In the first instance, it will undoubtedly be of great interest to shcolars of the Revolution. ... However, the book also contains much of value to those seeking to examine issues of immigrations, national identity, naturalisation and citizenship in later periods.'Paul Lawrence, Reviews in History'meticulously researched ... also eminently readable.'Paul Lawrence, Reviews in History'a pragmatic approach to the evolution of policy certainly offers extremely useful insights for historians studying issues of immigration in all eras. Another theme ... which will also be of great interest to historians of later periods, is that of the gradual development of state surveillance and control of foreigners.'Paul Lawrence, Reviews in History'Michael Rapport has produced an interesting, concise and nuanced work which will be of interest to a wide range of historians.'Paul Lawrence, Reviews in History
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, April 2001
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
In 1789, the French Revolution was thought to have hailed an era of international fraternity. By 1793, this promise had died, with many foreigners expelled or jailed. This text explores why foreigners were squeezed out of French socio-political life.
Long Description
In 1789 the French Revolution opened with a cosmopolitan flourish and progressive observers across the world hailed a new era of international fraternity, based on a new kind of politics. Foreigners were welcomed to France, to enrich the regenerated nation and to become citizens. By the Terror of 1793-94, however, this universalist promise had all but died. Some foreigners in France were guillotined, hundreds of others were jailed, expelled, watched closely and were obliged to carry special identity cards. How and why foreignors were squeezed out of French social and political life- and to what extent- is the subject of this book. Besides such issues as citizenship, nationality, passports and surveillance, this study considers the experience of specific types of foreignors, like those who served in the French army; in the clergy; foreign radicals or patriots; and those who contributed to French economic life. The dramatic transformation in the fortunes of foreignors during the revolution reveals much about the origins of modern concepts of nationality and citizenship and the development of national identities. In defining the limit of the nation, the revolutionaries and foreignors alike faced difficulties which have particular ressonance today.
Long Description
The French Revolution began by welcoming foreigners to France. The revolutionaries sought to attract those who might have been useful. By the Terror, however, this early promise had given way to repression. This dramatic transformation reveals much about the development of national identities and the origins of modern concepts of nationality and citizenship.
Main Description
In 1789 the French Revolution opened with a cosmopolitan flourish and progressive observers across the world hailed a new era of international fraternity, based on a new kind of politics. Foreigners were welcomed to France, to enrich the regenerated nation and to become citizens. By theTerror of 1793-94, however, this universalist promise had all but died. Some foreigners in France were guillotined, hundreds of others were jailed, expelled, watched closely and were obliged to carry special identity cards. How and why foreignors were squeezed out of French social and politicallife- and to what extent- is the subject of this book. Besides such issues as citizenship, nationality, passports and surveillance, this study considers the experience of specific types of foreignors, like those who served in the French army; in the clergy; foreign radicals or patriots; and those who contributed to French economic life. The dramatictransformation in the fortunes of foreignors during the revolution reveals much about the origins of modern concepts of nationality and citizenship and the development of national identities. In defining the limit of the nation, the revolutionaries and foreignors alike faced difficulties which haveparticular ressonance today.
Table of Contents
Abbreviations
Introductionp. 1
To Live Free, to Die a Slave: Foreigners in Ancien Regime Francep. 31
Foreigners Under the Constituent Assemblyp. 83
Foreigners, War, and the Republicp. 134
The Terrorp. 189
Foreigners between Thermidor and Brumairep. 259
Epiloguep. 316
Conclusionp. 327
Bibliographyp. 345
Indexp. 359
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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