Catalogue


Oral and literate culture in England, 1500-1700 [electronic resource] /
Adam Fox.
imprint
Oxford : Clarendon Press ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2000.
description
xi, 497 p., [12] p. of plates : ill.
ISBN
0198205120 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford : Clarendon Press ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2000.
isbn
0198205120 (Cloth)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Title from e-book title screen (viewed October 15, 2007).
catalogue key
7370308
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [414]-457) and index.
A Look Inside
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
Whitfield Prize, GBR, 2000 : Won
Reviews
Review Quotes
A stimulating account of the fabric of lived experience across England in the early modern period.
'excellent research in Star Chamber records yields wonderful instances of verses mocking figures of authority'TLS
Exhilarating ... Adam Fox has written a most illuminating and thought-provoking account of this important subject, illustrated with an immense number of telling, pertinent and memorable examples.
Fox's encyclopaedic knowledge of the period and his keen sense of the connections between different cultural milieus has resulted in a masterpiece that thoroughly reorders some of the most basic categories through which we study the past. In its totalizing sweep and remarkable archival richness, it begs comparison with Religion and the Decline of Magic and The Stripping of the Altars, and in many ways it does for social history what those books did for the history of religious belief.
'painstaking research in many types of sources enables Fox to tell us far more than we might have thought it possible to know about the permeation of text into popular culture and the contribution of oral tradition to publication and print.'TLS
Rarely has a book of early modern English history so thoroughly conveyed the impression that the author has read every source produced in the England of that time ... tour de force.
This compelling study explores the interaction between speech, script and print ... Adam Fox's account of early modern English oral culture combines penetrating analysis with celebration of that culture's vigour, diversity, and inventiveness.
This densely researched book is another rich contribution to the growing analysis of popular culture within a complex area which is difficult for the historian to retrieve - early modern England. Fox has meticulously drawn upon a wide range of fascinating sources ... this is a book to provoke thought and open up new avenues of historical awareness.
This is a delightful book which will both impress the academic specialist and enthral the general reader.
'painstaking research in many types of sources enables Fox to tell us far more than we might have thought it possible to know about the permeation of text into popular culture and the contribution of oral tradition to publication and print.'TLS'excellent research in Star Chamber records yields wonderful instances of verses mocking figures of authority'TLS
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This book explores the oral culture of early modern England. It focuses upon dialect speech and proverbial wisdom, old wives' tales and children's lore, historical legends and local customs, scurrilous versifying and scandalous rumour-mongering.
Long Description
Oral and Literate Culture in England explores the rich oral culture of early modern England. It focuses upon dialect speech and proverbial wisdom, "old wives' tales" and children's lore, historical legends and local customs, scurrilous versifying and scandalous rumor-mongering. Adam Fox demonstrates the extent to which this vernacular world was fundamentally structured by written and printed sources over the course of the period.
Long Description
This book explores the varied vernacular forms and rich oral traditions which were such a part of popular culture in early modern England. It focuses, in particular, upon dialect speech and proverbial wisdom, "old wives' tales" and children's lore, historical legends and local customs, scurrilous versifying and scandalous rumour-mongering. Adam Fox argues that while the spoken word provides the most vivid insight into the mental world of the majority in this semi-literate society, it was by no means untouched by written influences. Even at the beginning of the period, centuries of reciprocal infusion between complementary media had created a cultural repertoire which had long ceased to be purely oral. Thereafter, the expansion of literacy together with the proliferation of texts both in manuscript and print saw the rapid acceleration and elaboration of this process. By 1700 popular traditions and modes of expression were the product of a fundamentally literate environment to a much greater extent than has yet been appreciated.
Main Description
'A stimulating account of the fabric of lived experience across England in the early modern period.' -Years Work in English Studies'Fox's encyclopaedic knowledge of the period and his keen sense of the connections between different cultural milieus has resulted in a masterpiece that thoroughly reorders some of the most basic categories through which we study the past. In its totalizing sweep and remarkable archival richness, it begs comparison with Religion and the Decline of Magic and The Stripping of the Altars, and in many ways it does for social history what those books did for the history of religious belief.' -Reformation'Rarely has a book of early modern English history so thoroughly conveyed the impression that the author has read every source produced in the England of that time... tour de force.' -Reformation'This densely researched book is another rich contribution to the growing analysis of popular culture within a complex area which is difficult for the historian to retrieve - early modern England. Fox has meticulously drawn upon a wide range of fascinating sources... this is a book to provoke thought and open up new avenues of historical awareness.' -Social History Society Bulletin'Exhilarating... Adam Fox has written a most illuminating and thought-provoking account of this important subject, illustrated with an immense number of telling, pertinent and memorable examples.' - English Historical Review'This compelling study explores the interaction between speech, script and print... Adam Fox's account of early modern English oral culture combines penetrating analysis with celebration of that culture's vigour, diversity, and inventiveness.' -English Historical Review'Painstaking research in many types of sources enables Fox to tell us far more than we might have thought it possible to know about the permeation of text into popular culture and the contribution of oral tradition to publication and print.' -Times Literary SupplementOral and Literate Culture in England, 1500-1700 explores the rich oral culture of early modern England. It focuses upon dialect speech and proverbial wisdom, 'old wives' tales' and children's lore, historical legends and local customs, scurrilous versifying and scandalous rumour-mongering. Adam Fox demonstrates the extent to which this vernacular world was fundamentally structured by written and printed sources over the course of the period.
Main Description
This book explores the varied vernacular forms and rich oral traditions which were such a part of popular culture in early modern England. It focuses, in particular, upon dialect speech and proverbial wisdom, "old wives' tales" and children's lore, historical legends and local customs,scurrilous versifying and scandalous rumour-mongering. Adam Fox argues that while the spoken word provides the most vivid insight into the mental world of the majority in this semi-literate society, it was by no means untouched by written influences. Even at the beginning of the period, centuries of reciprocal infusion between complementary media hadcreated a cultural repertoire which had long ceased to be purely oral. Thereafter, the expansion of literacy together with the proliferation of texts both in manuscript and print saw the rapid acceleration and elaboration of this process. By 1700 popular traditions and modes of expression were theproduct of a fundamentally literate environment to a much greater extent than has yet been appreciated.
Table of Contents
Introduction: The Oral and the Literate
Popular Speech
Proverbial Wisdom
Old Wives' Tales and Nursery Lore
The Historical Imagination
Local Custom, Memory, and Record
Ballads and Libels
Rumour and News
Conclusion
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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