Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

UofT Libraries is getting a new library services platform in January 2021.
Learn more about the change.

Catharine Macaulay and Mercy Otis Warren [electronic resource] : the revolutionary Atlantic and the politics of gender /
Kate Davies.
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2005.
description
xi, 319 p. : ill.
ISBN
0199281106 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2005.
isbn
0199281106 (Cloth)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Title from e-book title screen (viewed October 15, 2007).
catalogue key
7370071
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Davies's work should be essential to any future effort to trace the transatlantic careers of literary and intellectual forms associated with gender, republicanism, and revolution."--Bryan Waterman, American Historical Review "A splendid book."--Ruth H. Bloch, William and Mary Quarterly
"Davies's work should be essential to any future effort to trace the transatlantic careers of literary and intellectual forms associated with gender, republicanism, and revolution."--Bryan Waterman,American Historical Review "A splendid book."--Ruth H. Bloch,William and Mary Quarterly
Introduction: Catharine Macaulay and Mercy Otis Warren: Women, Writing, and the Anglo-American Public Sphere 1. Catharine Macaulay, Thomas Hollis, and the London Opposition 2. 'Out Cornelia-ising Cornelia': Portraits, Profession, and the Gendered Character of Learning 3. iBelle Sauvage/i: Catharine Macaulay and the American War in Britain 4. Mercy Otis Warren's Revolutionary Letters 5. iFree and Easy/i: Boston's Fashionable Dilemma 6. Mercy Otis Warren's Independence Conclusion: Public Voices
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Catharine Macaulay and Mercy Otis were radical friends in a revolutionary age. Drawing on new research, this book considers Macaulay and Warren in the context of the revolutionary Atlantic. In a series of detailed interdisciplinary studies, Davis suggests the centrality of both women to transatlantic political cultures.
Long Description
Catharine Macaulay and Mercy Otis Warren were radical friends in a revolutionary age. They produced definitive histories of the English Civil War and the American Revolution, attacked the British government and the United States federal constitution, and instigated a debate on women's rights which inspired Mary Wollstonecraft, Judith Sargent Murray, and other feminists. Drawing on new research (including recently discovered correspondence) this is the first book to consider Macaulayand Warren in the context of the revolutionary Atlantic. In a series of detailed interdisciplinary studies, Davies suggests the centrality of both women to transatlantic political cultures between the middle of the eighteenth century and the turn of the nineteenth. The experience of Anglo-Americanconflict formed Macaulay and Warren's friendship and radically changed their writing lives. In showing how it did so, Davies also explains how the revolutionary Atlantic shaped modern ideas of gender difference. Anglo-American separation had a politics of gender which defined Warren and Macaulay's awareness of themselves as women and of which their writing also offered important critiques. Davies's book reveals the political significance of Mercy Otis Warren and Catharine Macaulay to an erawhen the truths of patriotism, nationhood and empire were never wholly self-evident but were hotly contested.
Main Description
Catharine Macaulay and Mercy Otis Warren were radical friends in a revolutionary age. They produced definitive histories of the English Civil War and the American Revolution, attacked the British government and the United States federal constitution, and instigated a debate on women's rights which inspired Mary Wollstonecraft, Judith Sargent Murray, and other feminists. Drawing on new research (including recently discovered correspondence) this is the first book to consider Macaulay and Warren in the context of the revolutionary Atlantic. In a series of detailed interdisciplinary studies, Davies suggests the centrality of both women to transatlantic political cultures between the middle of the eighteenth century and the turn of the nineteenth. The experience of Anglo-American conflict formed Macaulay and Warren's friendship and radically changed their writing lives. In showing how it did so, Davies also explains how the revolutionary Atlantic shaped modern ideas of gender difference. Anglo-American separation had a politics of gender which defined Warren and Macaulay's awareness of themselves as women and of which their writing also offered important critiques. Davies's book reveals the political significance of Mercy Otis Warren and Catharine Macaulay to an era when the truths of patriotism, nationhood and empire were never wholly self-evident but were hotly contested.
Main Description
Catharine Macaulay and Mercy Otis Warren were radical friends in a revolutionary age. They produced definitive histories of the English Civil War and the American Revolution, attacked the British government and the United States federal constitution, and instigated a debate on women's rightswhich inspired Mary Wollstonecraft, Judith Sargent Murray, and other feminists. Drawing on new research (including recently discovered correspondence) this is the first book to consider Macaulay and Warren in the context of the revolutionary Atlantic. In a series of detailed interdisciplinarystudies, Davies suggests the centrality of both women to transatlantic political cultures between the middle of the eighteenth century and the turn of the nineteenth. The experience of Anglo-American conflict formed Macaulay and Warren's friendship and radically changed their writing lives. Inshowing how it did so, Davies also explains how the revolutionary Atlantic shaped modern ideas of gender difference. Anglo-American separation had a politics of gender which defined Warren and Macaulay's awareness of themselves as women and of which their writing also offered important critiques.Davies's book reveals the political significance of Mercy Otis Warren and Catharine Macaulay to an era when the truths of patriotism, nationhood and empire were never wholly self-evident but were hotly contested.
Table of Contents
Introduction: Catharine Macaulay and Mercy Otis Warren: Women, Writing, and the Anglo-American Public Sphere
Catharine Macaulay, Thomas Hollis, and the London Opposition
'Out Cornelia-ising Cornelia': Portraits, Profession, and the Gendered Character of Learning
Belle Sauvage : Catharine Macaulay and the American War in Britain
Mercy Otis Warren's Revolutionary Letters
Free and Easy : Boston's Fashionable Dilemma
Mercy Otis Warren's Independence
Conclusion: Public Voices
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem