Catalogue


Writing after Sidney [electronic resource] : the literary response to Sir Philip Sidney, 1586-1640 /
Gavin Alexander.
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2006.
description
xliv, 380 p. : ports.
ISBN
0199285470 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2006.
isbn
0199285470 (Cloth)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Title from e-book title screen (viewed October 15, 2007).
catalogue key
7369894
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [339]-361) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Gavin Alexander is a Lecturer in the Faculty of English and Fellow, Librarian, and Director of Studies in English at Christ's College, University of Cambridge.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Alexander Gavin's learned and provocative study adds much to Sidney studies of the last several decades. Brilliant literary analysis."- Sixteenth Century Journal
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Summaries
Long Description
Writing After Sidney examines the literary response to Sir Philip Sidney (1554-86), author of the Arcadia, Astrophil and Stella, and The Defence of Poesy, and the most immediately influential writer of the Elizabethan period. It does so by looking closely both at Sidney and at four writers who had an important stake in his afterlife: his sister Mary Sidney, his brother Robert Sidney, his best friend Fulke Greville, and his niece Mary Wroth. At the same time as these authors wrote their own works in response to Sidney they presented his life and writings to the world, and were shaped by other writers as his literary and political heirs. Readings of these five central authors are embedded in a more general study of the literary and cultural scene in the years after Sidney's death, examining the work of such writers as Spenser, Jonson, Daniel, Drayton, and Herbert. The study uses a wide range of manuscript and printed sources, and key use is made of perspectives from Renaissance literary theory, especially Renaissance rhetoric. The book aims to come to a better understanding of the nature of Sidney's impact on the literature of the fifty or so years after his death in 1586; it also aims to improve our understanding both of Sidney and of the other writers discussed by developing a more nuanced approach to the questions of imitation and example so central to Renaissance literature. It thereby adds to the general store of our understanding of how writing of the English Renaissance offered examples to later readers and writers, and of how it encountered and responded to such examples itself.
Main Description
Writing After Sidney examines the literary response to Sir Philip Sidney (1554-86), author of the Arcadia , Astrophil and Stella , and The Defence of Poesy , and the most immediately influential writer of the Elizabethan period. It does so by looking closely both at Sidney and at four writers who had an important stake in his afterlife: his sister Mary Sidney, his brother Robert Sidney, his best friend Fulke Greville, and his niece Mary Wroth. At the same time as these authors wrote their own works in response to Sidney they presented his life and writings to the world, and were shaped by other writers as his literary and political heirs. Readings of these five central authors are embedded in a more general study of the literary and cultural scene in the years after Sidney's death, examining the work of such writers as Spenser, Jonson, Daniel, Drayton, and Herbert. The study uses a wide range of manuscript and printed sources, and key use is made of perspectives from Renaissance literary theory, especially Renaissance rhetoric. The book aims to come to a better understanding of the nature of Sidney's impact on the literature of the fifty or so years after his death in 1586; it also aims to improve our understanding both of Sidney and of the other writers discussed by developing a more nuanced approach to the questions of imitation and example so central to Renaissance literature. It thereby adds to the general store of our understanding of how writing of the English Renaissance offered examples to later readers and writers, and of how it encountered and responded to such examples itself.
Main Description
Writing After Sidney examines the literary response to Sir Philip Sidney (1554-86), author of the Arcadia, Astrophil and Stella, and The Defence of Poesy, and the most immediately influential writer of the Elizabethan period. It does so by looking closely both at Sidney and at four writers whohad an important stake in his afterlife: his sister Mary Sidney, his brother Robert Sidney, his best friend Fulke Greville, and his niece Mary Wroth. At the same time as these authors wrote their own works in response to Sidney they presented his life and writings to the world, and were shaped byother writers as his literary and political heirs. Readings of these five central authors are embedded in a more general study of the literary and cultural scene in the years after Sidney's death, examining the work of such writers as Spenser, Jonson, Daniel, Drayton, and Herbert. The study uses awide range of manuscript and printed sources, and key use is made of perspectives from Renaissance literary theory, especially Renaissance rhetoric. The book aims to come to a better understanding of the nature of Sidney's impact on the literature of the fifty or so years after his death in 1586; italso aims to improve our understanding both of Sidney and of the other writers discussed by developing a more nuanced approach to the questions of imitation and example so central to Renaissance literature. It thereby adds to the general store of our understanding of how writing of the EnglishRenaissance offered examples to later readers and writers, and of how it encountered and responded to such examples itself.
Title Summary
"Sir Philip Sidney (1554-86), author of the Arcadia, Astrophil and Stella, and The Defence of Poesy, was the most immediately influential writer of the Elizabethan period. Writing After Sidney examine the literary response to this major figure through four writers who had an important stake in his afterlife: his sister Mary Sidney, his brother Robert Sidney, his best friend Fulke Greville, and his niece Mary Wroth. At the same time as these authors wrote their own works in response to Sidney they presented his life and writings to the world, and were shaped by other writers as his literary and political heirs. Readings of these four authors and of Sidney's own work are embedded in a more general study of the literary and cultural scene in the years after Sidney's death, including the work of such writers as Spenser, Jonson, Daniel, Drayton, and Herbert." "The study uses a wide range of manuscript and printed sources, as well as perspectives from Renaissance literary theory, especially rhetoric. It offers a new understanding of the nature of Sidney's impact on the literature of the fifty or so years after his death in 1586 and develops a nuanced approach to the questions of imitation and example so central to Renaissance literature. Writing After Sidney makes a significant contribution to our understanding of how writing of the English Renaissance offered examples to later readers and writers, and of how it encountered and responded to such examples itself."--BOOK JACKET.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. xi
Note on Spelling, References, and Abbreviationsp. xiii
Introductionp. xix
Dialogue and Incompletion: Philip Sidneyp. 1
Elegies and Legaciesp. 56
The Last Word: Mary Sidney, Countess of Pembrokep. 76
Families and Friendsp. 128
Finding and Making: Robert Sidneyp. 149
Lyric After Sidneyp. 193
Life After Sidney: Fulke Grevillep. 220
Versions of Arcadiap. 262
The Constant Art: Mary Wrothp. 283
Postscriptp. 332
Bibliographyp. 339
Indexp. 363
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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