Catalogue


Centre and provinces--China 1978-1993 [electronic resource] : power as non-zero-sum /
by Linda Chelan Li.
imprint
Oxford : Clarendon Press ; Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1998.
description
xiv, 342 p. : ill., map : 22 cm.
ISBN
0198293615 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford : Clarendon Press ; Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1998.
isbn
0198293615 (Cloth)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Title from e-book title screen (viewed October 15, 2007).
catalogue key
7369756
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [307]-336) and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Exploring beyond the dominant state capacity paradigm, this text argues for an interactive model to explain the political relations between the central and provincial governments in contemporary China.
Long Description
Centre and Provinces: China 1978-93 goes beyond the dominant state capacity paradigm to argue for an interactive model to explain the political relations between the central and provincial governments in contemporary China. The uni-dimensional, centrist perspective of the state capacity paradigm has failed to adequately explain the coexistence of central and provincial power, and to anticipate circumstances of change. In this book a hybrid rational-choice cum institutional approach highlights the mutual power of both the Centre and the provinces. each party, the Centre or the provinces, imposes structural constraints upon the other. Power is not a zero-sum game. The cases of Shanghai and Guangdong, important resourceful provinces under very different central policy contexts, contrast possible interactions between central policy and provincial choice. Conflicts amidst a context of mutual dependence necessitate compromise on both sides, and qualitative changes to centreprovince relations as a result may well have long-term implications for wider political processes.
Long Description
This book constructs an interactive model of power to explain the relations of the central and provincial governments in reform China. Unlike most previous analyses, Centre and Provinces: China 1978-93 argues that provincial non-compliance is partly the product of central policy as well as provincial choice.
Main Description
Centre and Provinces: China 1978-93 goes beyond the dominant state capacity paradigm to argue for an interactive model to explain the political relations between the central and provincial governments in contemporary China. The uni-dimensional, centrist perspective of the state capacityparadigm has failed to adequately explain the coexistence of central and provincial power, and to anticipate circumstances of change. In this book a hybrid rational-choice cum institutional approach highlights the mutual power of both the Centre and the provinces. each party, the Centre or theprovinces, imposes structural constraints upon the other. Power is not a zero-sum game. The cases of Shanghai and Guangdong, important resourceful provinces under very different central policy contexts, contrast possible interactions between central policy and provincial choice. Conflicts amidst a context of mutual dependence necessitate compromise on both sides, and qualitativechanges to centreprovince relations as a result may well have long-term implications for wider political processes.
Table of Contents
Introduction
Towards a non-zero sum analytical framework
Decline in central control over investment
Investment in Guangdong: central policy and provincial implementation
Investment in Shanghai: central policy and provincial implementation
Discretion and strategies in Guangdong
Discretion and strategies in Shanghai
Centre and provinces: interactive processes
Shifting central provincial relations: emerging trends
Data collection
Interview respondents
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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