Catalogue


Getting good crops : economic and diplomatic survival strategies of the Montana Bitterroot Salish Indians, 1870-1891 /
Robert J. Bigart.
imprint
Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2010.
description
xiv, 284 p. : ill., map ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0806141336 (hardcover : alk. paper), 9780806141336 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2010.
isbn
0806141336 (hardcover : alk. paper)
9780806141336 (hardcover : alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction : questions and methods -- Strategic seeds : pre-1870 origins of Salish survival strategies -- Dancing with death : Bitterroot Salish diplomacy and military struggle on the buffalo grounds, 1870-1883 -- Prickly allies : Salish efforts on the buffalo hunt to preserve their military alliance with the Whites, 1870-1883 -- Navigating a minefield : the Nez Perce War crisis and Salish relations with Missoula County Whites, 1870-1878 -- Coping with the great father : the politics of Salish survival, 1868-1886 -- Hesitant friendship : Salish-White cooperation and amity in the Bitterroot Valley, 1870-1891 -- Keeping the lid on : Salish-White friction in the Bitterroot Valley, 1870-1891 -- "I have ploughed with my hands, they are worn out" : Salish agricultural development in the Bitterroot Valley, 1870-1889 -- "Charlot loves his people!"; the defeat of Salish aspirations for an independent Bitterroot Valley community, 1889-1891 -- Epilogue : the struggle continues.
catalogue key
7367773
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 261-273) and index.
A Look Inside
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This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, November 2010
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Summaries
Main Description
In Getting Good Crops, Robert J. Bigart examines the full range of available sources to explain how the Salish survived into the twentieth century, despite their small numbers, their military disadvantages, and the aggressive invasion of white settlers who greedily devoured their land and its natural resources.
Main Description
Tells how one American Indian tribe survived despite overwhelming challenges In 1870, the Bitterroot Salish Indians-called "Flatheads" by the first white explorers to encounter them-were a small tribe living on the western slope of the Northern Rocky Mountains in Montana Territory. Pressures on the Salish were intensifying during this time, from droughts and dwindling resources to aggressive neighboring tribes and Anglo-American expansion. In 1891, the economically impoverished Salish accepted government promises of assistance and retreated to the Flathead Reservation, more than sixty miles from their homeland. In Getting Good Crops, Robert J. Bigart examines the full range of available sources to explain how the Salish survived into the twentieth century, despite their small numbers, their military disadvantages, and the aggressive invasion of white settlers who greedily devoured their land and its natural resources. Bigart argues that a key to the survival of the Salish, from the early nineteenth century onward, was their diplomatic agility and willingness to form strategic alliances and friendships with non-Salish peoples. In doing so, the Salish navigated their way through multiple crises, relying more on their wits than on force. The Salish also took steps to sustain themselves economically. Although hunting and gathering had been their mainstay for centuries, the Salish began farming - "getting good crops" - to feed themselves because buffalo were becoming increasingly scarce. Raised on the Flathead Reservation himself, the author is seeking to convey the Salish story from their perspective, despite the paucity of written Salish testimony. What emerges is a picture - both inspiring and heartbreaking- of a people maintaining autonomy against all odds.
Main Description
Tells how one American Indian tribe survived despite overwhelming challenges In 1870, the Bitterroot Salish Indians-called “Flatheads” by the first white explorers to encounter them-were a small tribe living on the western slope of the Northern Rocky Mountains in Montana Territory. Pressures on the Salish were intensifying during this time, from droughts and dwindling resources to aggressive neighboring tribes and Anglo-American expansion. In 1891, the economically impoverished Salish accepted government promises of assistance and retreated to the Flathead Reservation, more than sixty miles from their homeland. In Getting Good Crops, Robert J. Bigart examines the full range of available sources to explain how the Salish survived into the twentieth century, despite their small numbers, their military disadvantages, and the aggressive invasion of white settlers who greedily devoured their land and its natural resources. Bigart argues that a key to the survival of the Salish, from the early nineteenth century onward, was their diplomatic agility and willingness to form strategic alliances and friendships with non-Salish peoples. In doing so, the Salish navigated their way through multiple crises, relying more on their wits than on force. The Salish also took steps to sustain themselves economically. Although hunting and gathering had been their mainstay for centuries, the Salish began farming - “getting good crops” - to feed themselves because buffalo were becoming increasingly scarce. Raised on the Flathead Reservation himself, the author is seeking to convey the Salish story from their perspective, despite the paucity of written Salish testimony. What emerges is a picture - both inspiring and heartbreaking- of a people maintaining autonomy against all odds.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. xi
List of Figuresp. xii
Prefacep. xiii
Introduction: Questions and Methodsp. 3
Strategic Seeds: Pre-1870 Origins of Salish Survival Strategiesp. 18
Dancing with Death: Bitterroot Salish Diplomacy and Military Struggle on the Buffalo Grounds, 1870-1883p. 47
Prickly Allies: Salish Efforts on the Buffalo Hunt to Preserve Their Military Alliance with the Whites, 1870-1883p. 65
Navigating a Minefield: The Nez Perce War Crisis and Salish Relations with Missoula County Whites, 1870-1878p. 82
Coping with the Great Father: The Politics of Salish Survival, 1868-1886p. 115
Hesitant Friendship: Salish-White Cooperation and Amity in the Bitterroot Valley, 1870-1891p. 137
Keeping the Lid On: Salish-White Friction in the Bitterroot Valley, 1870-1891p. 161
"I Have Ploughed with My Hands, They Are Worn Out": Salish Agricultural Development in the Bitterroot Valley, 1870-1889p. 177
"Charlot Loves His People!": The Defeat of Salish Aspirations for an Independent Bitterroot Valley Community, 1889-1891p. 194
Epilogue: The Struggle Continuesp. 218
Notesp. 225
Bibliographyp. 261
Indexp. 275
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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