Catalogue

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Way up north in Louisville : African American migration in the urban South, 1930-1970 /
Luther Adams.
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2010.
description
xiv, 272 p.
ISBN
080783422X (cloth : alk. paper), 9780807834220 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2010.
isbn
080783422X (cloth : alk. paper)
9780807834220 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Headed for Louisville : African American migration within the South -- Way up north in Louisville : migration and the meaning of the South -- I never Jim Crowed myself : navigating the boundaries of race in the River City -- No room for possum or crawfish : African American migrants' challenge to Jim Crow -- Behold the land : to stay and fight at home and struggle for civil rights -- Upon this rock : African American migration and the transformation of the postwar urban landscape.
catalogue key
7364499
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
In the wake of World War II, when roughly half the black population left the South seeking greater opportunity and freedom in the North and West, the same desire often anchored African Americans to the South. Adams offers a powerful reinterpretation of the modern civil rights movement and of the transformations in black urban life within the contexts of migration, work, and urban renewal. While acknowledging the destructive downside of emerging post-industrialism for African Americans in the Jim Crow South, Adams concludes that persistent patterns of economic and racial inequality did not rob black people of their capacity to act in their own interests.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2011-08-01:
Recent histories devoted to 20th-century African American migration have focused primarily on the two great migrations during which some 5 million people left the South. By contrast, this unique study "departs from the previous scholarship by examining how African American migrants who stayed in the South transformed the culture and politics of the South from within the South." Adams (Univ. of Washington, Tacoma) also uses "home" as a conceptual framework to explain the site in which African Americans constructed a community and culture partially autonomous of their enduring resistance to white supremacy. Throughout, Adams details the struggle of Louisville's black residents, many thousands of whom arrived in the city during the economic and political upheavals that drove the great migrations north and west. They built networks to aid one another in finding housing, jobs, and access to the city's African American cultural and social life, and in so doing impacted the course of the civil rights movement and postwar urban development. Adams extensively uses archived oral histories as well as several exclusive interviews. The records of local government institutions, churches, libraries, and newspapers enrich the narrative. A well-told story and a fine example of historiographic method. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. J. R. Wendland Grand Valley State University
Appeared in Library Journal on 2010-11-01:
As a counter to the many recent studies of the African American populations that left the South for the North in the mid-20th century, Adams studies the lives and transformations among those who remained in the urban South. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A well-told story and a fine example of historiographic method. Highly recommended. All levels/libraries." - Choice
"The book is a concise but solid contribution to the growing field of urban studies and scholarship on the black freedom struggle. The volume will appeal to readers interested in the complexity of black migration to the urban South and the effectiveness of the fight for racial equality in Kentucky." - Journal of American History
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, November 2010
Choice, August 2011
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
In the wake of World War II, roughly half the black population left the South seeking greater opportunity and freedom in the North and West, although the same desire often anchored African Americans to the South. This book explores the forces that led blacks to move to urban centres in the South to make their homes.
Main Description
Luther Adams demonstrates that in the wake of World War II, when roughly half the black population left the South seeking greater opportunity and freedom in the North and West, the same desire often anchored African Americans to the South. Way Up North in Louisville explores the forces that led blacks to move to urban centers in the South to make their homes. Adams defines "home" as a commitment to life in the South that fueled the emergence of a more cohesive sense of urban community and enabled southern blacks to maintain their ties to the South as a place of personal identity, family, and community. This commitment to the South energized the rise of a more militant movement for full citizenship rights and respect for the humanity of black people. Way Up North in Louisville offers a powerful reinterpretation of the modern civil rights movement and of the transformations in black urban life within the interrelated contexts of migration, work, and urban renewal, which spurred the fight against residential segregation and economic inequality. While acknowledging the destructive downside of emerging post-industrialism for African Americans in the Jim Crow South, Adams concludes that persistent patterns of economic and racial inequality did not rob black people of their capacity to act in their own interests.
Main Description
Luther Adams demonstrates that in the wake of World War II, when roughly half the black population left the South seeking greater opportunity and freedom in the North and West, the same desire often anchored African Americans to the South.Way Up North in Louisvilleexplores the forces that led blacks to move to urban centers in the South to make their homes. Adams defines "home" as a commitment to life in the South that fueled the emergence of a more cohesive sense of urban community and enabled southern blacks to maintain their ties to the South as a place of personal identity, family, and community. This commitment to the South energized the rise of a more militant movement for full citizenship rights and respect for the humanity of black people. Way Up North in Louisvilleoffers a powerful reinterpretation of the modern civil rights movement and of the transformations in black urban life within the interrelated contexts of migration, work, and urban renewal, which spurred the fight against residential segregation and economic inequality. While acknowledging the destructive downside of emerging post-industrialism for African Americans in the Jim Crow South, Adams concludes that persistent patterns of economic and racial inequality did not rob black people of their capacity to act in their own interests.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introductionp. 1
Headed For Louisville African American Migration within the Southp. 13
Way Up North in Louisville Migration and the Meaning of the Southp. 37
I Never Jim Crowed Myself Navigating the Boundaries of Race in the River Cityp. 59
No Room For Possum or Crawfish African American Migrants' Challenge to Jim Crowp. 85
Behold the Land to Stay and Fight at Home and Struggle for Civil Rightsp. 123
Upon this Rock African American Migration and the Transformation of the Postwar Urban Landscapep. 149
Conclusion A Tale of Two Citiesp. 185
Appendix Migration, Population, and Employment Datap. 197
Notesp. 203
Bibliographyp. 235
Permissions for the Reprinting of Song Lyricsp. 255
Indexp. 257
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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