Catalogue


1089 and all that : a journey into mathematics /
David Acheson.
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2010.
description
v, 178 p. : ill. 18 cm.
ISBN
0199590028 (pbk.), 9780199590025 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
Subjects
subject
More Details
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2010.
isbn
0199590028 (pbk.)
9780199590025 (pbk.)
contents note
1089 and all that -- 'In love with geometry' -- But-- that's absurd- -- The trouble with algebra -- The heavens in motion -- All change! -- On being as small as possible -- 'Are we nearly there?' -- A brief history of [pi] -- Good vibrations -- Great mistakes -- What is the secret of all life? -- E = 2.718-- -- Chaos and catastrophe -- Not quite the Indian rope trick -- Real or imaginary?
general note
Originally published: 2002.
catalogue key
7364272
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
David Acheson's extraordinary little book makes mathematics accessible to everyone. From very simple beginnings he takes us on a thrilling journey to some deep mathematical ideas. On the way, via Kepler and Newton, he explains what calculus really means, gives a brief history of pi, and even takes us to chaos theory and imaginary numbers. Every short chapter is carefully crafted to ensure that no one will get lost on the journey. Packed with puzzles and illustrated by world famous cartoonists, this is one of the most readable and imaginative books on mathematics ever written.
Reviews
Review Quotes
'[Acheson] takes the reader on a scenic tour of mathematics.'Times Higher Education Supplement
"[Acheson] takes the reader on a scenic tour of mathematics." --Times Higher Education Supplement
"... attractively produced ... The author has an easy, light style which should appeal to most readers." --The Mathematical Gazette 15/09/2004
"It's an adorable, lovable, inspiring little masterpiece!" --MAA Online
"I was surprised to see how much substantial mathematics David Acheson has squeezed into this well-crafted litte book... Even mathematicians will find fresh perspectives on old themes in this playful and inventive book." --John Mighton, The Mathematical Intelligence
"...pages filled with a contagious enthusiasm... It has been produced with great care: at more than one point, one notices how artfully figures were placed. For example, at least twice a surprising conclusion appears just as we turn the page... This book packs a lifetime of wisdom and delightinto sixteen brief chapters." --MAA Online
"... parts of this book are extremely funny... [It is] an ideal stocking filler... an ideal present for friends and relatives who are not mathematicians, but have enough curiosity to spend a gentle afternoon trying to find out what mathematics is about... Buy this book." --London Mathematical Society Newsletter
Popular maths is not easy to do, but David Acheson has really achieved it with this pocket-sized gem of a book.
Review from previous edition: "One of the happier effects of the explosion in popular science books is that every so often an author presents scientific ideas in a new way...Starting from such minimalist material, David Acheson works his way up to chaos and catastrophe. Not a page passeswithout at least one intriguing insight...This is a clever book, and anything but trivial...all mathmaticians should buy at least a dozen copies to hand out to people they meet at parties. My enthusiasm for it knows no bounds." --Ian Stewart, New Scientist
"There are more fascinating things in the book that cannot be described here. So, here is the message to all potential readers of this type of mathematical writing: even though you have doubtless read everything by Keith Devlin, Simon Singh, Martin Gardner, Raymond Smullyan, Lewis Carroll andyou-name-it, this wonderful work is yet another 'must' for your bookshelf!" --EMS 25/08/2004
"This is an excellent and entertaining little book... Every teenage mathematician and every school library should have a copy... a most entertaining read." --Symmetry Plus
"... this wonderful work is yet another 'must' for your bookshelf!... Well-known topics are not missing in the book, [readers] will always find something new and interesting in this book... each reader, whether mathematician or keen layman, will be delighted." --European Mathematical Society Newsletter
"Thought-provoking!"
Review from previous edition:'1089 and All That is an instant classic... an inspiring little masterpiece.' - Mathematical Association of America"Popular maths is not easy to do, but David Acheson has really achieved it with this pocket-sized gem of a book." - Brian Clegg, Popular Science
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Using entertaining illustrations, photographs and drawings David Acheson introduces mathematics in a manner that is designed to provide non-mathematicians with a quick and enjoyable overview of the subject.
Long Description
David Acheson's extraordinary little book makes mathematics accessible to everyone. From very simple beginnings he takes us on a thrilling journey to some deep mathematical ideas. On the way, via Kepler and Newton, he explains what calculus really means, gives a brief history of pi, and even takes us to chaos theory and imaginary numbers. Every short chapter is carefully crafted to ensure that no one will get lost on the journey. Packed with puzzles and illustrated by world famouscartoonists, this is one of the most readable and imaginative books on mathematics ever written.
Main Description
Pure mathematical gold, David Acheson's enthralling and insightful volume is brimful of nuggets that will make mathematics accessible to everyone. From deceptively simple beginnings, the thrilling journey takes the reader all the way through to some deep mathematical ideas, via Kepler andNewton, explaining what calculus really means, and even giving a brief history of pi. Every short page is carefully crafted to ensure no one will be lost along the way and the final destination is possibly the most beautiful and surprising mathematical statement in history. Packed with puzzles andillustrated with the help of world famous cartoonists, before the reader even notices they'll know more about chaos theory and imaginary numbers than they ever expected.
Table of Contents
1089 and All Thatp. 1
'In Love with Geometry'p. 9
But ... that's Absurd ...p. 19
The Trouble with Algebrap. 29
The Heavens in Motionp. 41
All Change!p. 53
On Being as Small as Possiblep. 61
'Are We Nearly There?'p. 73
A Brief History of ¿p. 83
Good Vibrationsp. 93
Great Mistakesp. 103
What is the Secret of All Life?p. 113
e = 2.718 ...p. 123
Chaos and Catastrophep. 135
Not Quite the Indian Rope Trickp. 147
Real or Imaginary?p. 159
Suggestions for Further Readingp. 171
The 1089 and All That Websitep. 172
Acknowledgmentsp. 172
Picture Creditsp. 173
Indexp. 175
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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