Catalogue


The curse of Berlin : Africa after the Cold War /
Adekeye Adebajo.
imprint
New York : Columbia University Press, c2010.
description
xxxiii, 414 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0231702000 (hardcover : alk. paper), 9780231702003 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Columbia University Press, c2010.
isbn
0231702000 (hardcover : alk. paper)
9780231702003 (hardcover : alk. paper)
contents note
Preface: Black Berlin and the curse of fragmentation : from Bismarck to Barack / Ali A. Mazrui -- Introduction: Bismarck's sorcery and Africa's three magic kingdoms -- pt. 1. The quest for security -- Prophets of pax Africana : Africa's security architecture -- From global apartheid to global village : Africa and the United Nations -- The pharaoh and the prophet : Boutros Boutros-Ghali and Kofi Annan -- pt. 2. The quest for hegemony -- Messiah or mercantilist? : South Africa in Africa -- Gulliver's troubles : Nigeria in Africa -- An axis of virtue? : South Africa and Nigeria in Africa -- An axis of evil? : China, the United States, and France in Africa -- The springbok and the dragon : South Africa vs. China in Africa -- pt. 3. The quest for unity -- Mandela and Rhodes : a monstrous marriage -- Thabo Mbeki : a Nkrumahist renaissance? -- Towers of Babel? : the African Union and the European Union -- Obamamania : Africa, African Americans, and the avuncular Sam -- The heirs of Gandhi : how Africa and Asia changed the world.
catalogue key
7363989
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2011-06-01:
The Berlin Conference of 1884-85 set in motion the process that culminated in the carving up of the African continent among European powers. Past analyses of its impact have focused on the immediate result--the colonization of the African continent. Adebajo (Center for Conflict Resolution, South Africa) has written an excellent overview of the long-term impacts of the Berlin Conference on contemporary African societies. The attention the author devotes to the post-Cold War era, particularly the internal structures of African societies, African leadership, and regional alignments, is very welcome. Adebajo captures, with great detail, the continuing impact of Africa's historical encounter with the West and Africa's role and place in contemporary global politics. The author pays significant attention to regional and global connections between and among selected African countries and personalities. Although Adebajo attempts to cover a whole lot in this single volume, the book is a significant and stimulating read for anyone interested in Africa's international relations and the evolving dynamics of contemporary African states. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. C. J. Korieh Marquette University
Reviews
Review Quotes
A deeply informed, insightful, at times brilliant book.
a good read -- especially for those seeking an understanding of historical and contemporary African issues.
[An] important book.
a rich account of the main actors and institutions that shape diplomacy, security, and development in postapartheid Africa.
...concise and entertaining...
Overall, this volume provides a fascinating insight into contemporary issues affecting African international relations, and the security--hegemony--unity framework used has the potential to become a powerful tool for analysis.
Adekeye Adebajo is one of the brightest of his generation of Africanists, and these essays not only display deep knowledge of the continent and its contemporary political problems but also, unlike so much academic writing, are written with considerable flair and enthusiasm. A must read for all scholars working on African international relations.
"Adekeye Adebajo is one of the brightest of his generation of Africanists, and these essays not only display deep knowledge of the continent and its contemporary political problems but also, unlike so much academic writing, are written with considerable flair and enthusiasm. A must read for all scholars working on African international relations." -- James Mayall, Cambridge University
This book is an intellectually and morally courageous analysis of Africa's place in the world, a tracing of its traumatic history, but not to bemoan it-to understand where Africa has come from, to appreciate where it is at present, and to shed light on where it is headed.
"This book is an intellectually and morally courageous analysis of Africa's place in the world, a tracing of its traumatic history, but not to bemoan it-to understand where Africa has come from, to appreciate where it is at present, and to shed light on where it is headed." -- Francis M. Deng, UN Special Advisor on the Prevention of Genocide
This superbly written and ambitiously conceived work takes us through the last two decades of Africa's international relations with critical acumen and an unusual eye for the big historical picture and the telling detail. This eloquent study is full of relevance for understanding the continent's current predicament.
"This superbly written and ambitiously conceived work takes us through the last two decades of Africa's international relations with critical acumen and an unusual eye for the big historical picture and the telling detail. This eloquent study is full of relevance for understanding the continent's current predicament." -- Ricardo Soares de Oliveira, Oxford University
This wide-ranging volume is about more than a continent. It is about global Africa. A powerful book that tries to explain the wider story of global Africa's struggles against enslavement, colonialism, and apartheid, and the search of a post-racial human condition.
"This wide-ranging volume is about more than a continent. It is about global Africa. A powerful book that tries to explain the wider story of global Africa's struggles against enslavement, colonialism, and apartheid, and the search of a post-racial human condition." -- Ali A. Mazrui, State University of New York
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2011
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
The first part of this book examines Africa's quest for security with three chapters on Africa's quest for security institutions. The second section of the book focuses on Africa's quest for leadership, and five chapters examine the hegemonic roles of different countries.
Main Description
At the 1884-1885 Conference of Berlin, a collection of states, mostly European, established the rules for the partition of Africa. The consequences of their decision had immense historical and structural implications apparent in the domestic and international behavior of the continent today. The "Curse," as the conference came to be called, is the grounding theme of Adekeye Adebajo's trenchant study, though his guiding focus is the development of Africa after the Cold War. Adebajo opens with Africa's quest for security, featuring essays on the continent's political institutions, such as the African Union and subregional bodies. He follows with chapters on the United Nations and its operations in Africa, particularly its political, peacekeeping, and socioeconomic missions. Adebajo includes two rare profiles of the secretary generals who worked with the UN from 1992 to 2006: Egypt's Boutros Boutros-Ghali and Ghana's Kofi Annan. Africa's pursuit of representative leadership informs the next section, with essays examining the hegemonic influence of South Africa, Nigeria, China, France, and the United States. Concluding chapters discuss Africa's search for unity, exploring the direct and indirect impact of Nelson Mandela, Thabo Mbeki, Kwame Nkrumah, Cecil Rhodes, Barack Obama, and Mahatma Gandhi. Adebajo also conducts a comparative assessment of the African and European Unions.
Table of Contents
Preface: Black Berlin and the Curse of Fragmentation: From Bismarck to Barackp. ix
Acknowledgementsp. xxix
Introduction: Bismarck's Sorcery and Africa's Three Magic Kingdomsp. 1
The Quest for Security
Prophets of Pax Africana: Africa's Security Architecturep. 31
From Global Apartheid to Global Village: Africa and the United Nationsp. 53
The Pharaoh and the Prophet: Boutros Boutros-Ghali and Kofi Annanp. 77
The Quest for Hegemony
Messiah or Mercantilist? South Africa in Africap. 101
Gulliver's Troubles: Nigeria in Africap. 123
An Axis of Virtue? South Africa and Nigeria in Africap. 143
An Axis of Evil? China, the United States, and France in Africap. 163
The Springbok and the Dragon: South Africa vs. China in Africap. 191
The Quest for Unity
Mandela and Rhodes: A Monstrous Marriagep. 215
Thabo Mbeki: A Nkrumahist Renaissance?p. 233
Towers of Babel? The African Union and the European Unionp. 261
Obamamania: Africa, African Americans, and the Avuncular Samp. 287
The Heirs of Gandhi: How Africa and Asia Changed the Worldp. 313
Notesp. 333
Indexp. 395
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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