Catalogue


Daddy's girl : comics /
by Debbie Drechsler.
imprint
Seattle, Wash. : Fantagraphics ; London : Turnaround [distributor], c2008.
description
86 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 20 cm.
ISBN
1560978945 (hbk.), 9781560978947 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Seattle, Wash. : Fantagraphics ; London : Turnaround [distributor], c2008.
isbn
1560978945 (hbk.)
9781560978947 (hbk.)
general note
Originally published by Fantagraphics in 1996.
catalogue key
7362593
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 1996-04-01:
Drechsler's quiet but formidable reputation in alternative comics can be traced to a series of melancholic short strips dealing with the incestuous victimization of a young girl by her father. This collection includes those dark tales as well as others that relate the painful experiences of Lily as she deals with both the usual problems of teenage adjustment and the ominous presence of her father. In "Sixteen," Lily's efforts to be social veer into an episode of sexual degradation and teenage cruelty. But Drechsler's touching stories of familial gloom also feature veins of subtle irony and hope-laden humor. In "Helping the Poor," Lily's self-righteously benevolent mother insists the family deliver gifts to a poor black family, and the delightful encounter between the children of the families reveals Drechsler's knack for wit and gentle pathos. Her drawings are characterized by an expressive linear flair and dark, vividly patterned forms-a stylish and poetic example of nuanced cartoon realism perfectly attuned to these affecting, humane vignettes. (June) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
Review Quotes
An excoriating piece of work, which manages a miraculous marriage of the brutal and the innocent The artwork is a visual feast, while the emerging portrait of a family and growing up is note perfect.
An excoriating piece of work, which manages a miraculous marriage of the brutal and the innocent'¦ The artwork'¦is a visual feast, while the emerging portrait of a family and growing up is note perfect.
An excoriating piece of work, which manages a miraculous marriage of the brutal and the innocent… The artwork…is a visual feast, while the emerging portrait of a family and growing up is note perfect.
Brutal and beautiful.
By turns chilling and poignant.
Drechsler "s expressionist style both enhances and contrasts with her characters " attempts to cling to innocence and identity in the face of personal horror.
Drechsler's expressionist style both enhances and contrasts with her characters' attempts to cling to innocence and identity in the face of personal horror.
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
A powerful autobiography of incest, Debbie Drechsler's acclaimed account of her incestuous relationship with her father is one of the most painfully honest and disturbing use of the medium of comics.
Long Description
A new edition of a long out-of-print Fantagraphics classic. Fantagraphics Books is proud to re-release one of the most powerful and moving books in its distinguished publishing history: Debbie Drechsler's first collection of short comic stories, "Daddy's Girl," Originally published in 1995 and distributed only to comic book specialty stores, "Daddy's Girl" was ahead of its time: Two years before "The Kiss," Kathryn Harrison's critically acclaimed story of her incestuous relationship with her father, Dreschler's account of her abuse at the hands of her father, told from the point of view of an adolescent, is one of the most searingly honest, empathetic, and profoundly disturbing uses of the comics medium in its history. Rendered entirely in black and white, Drechsler's meticulous brush lines gather into heavy textures that suggest the claustrophobic tension of the environment that threatens her pre-teen and adolescent female protagonists. Characters such as Lily, who can't escape her father's abuse, and Franny, a girl whose desire to be accepted leads her into dangerous territory, struggle not to be visually and emotionally overwhelmed. Both girls are rendered in chunky, rounded lines, as if they've been shaped by the oppressive weight of their blandly suburban milieu, where pretending that everything is all right and maintaining the status quo is prized above truth and upheaval. However, Drechsler's characters also have wide-open eyes, suggesting that they still maintain their innocence, and their world does contain some beauty and hope, as long as the characters have the resolve to look for it: art and creation is offered as a form of salvation. Central to this quasi-memoir isLily's relationship to her father--a confused jumble of fear, trepidation, and love. Drechsler's book was nominated for an Ignatz award the year it was released, and she went on to create the critically acclaimed "The Summer of Love," With the critical and commercial success of mature and uncompromising works by women cartoonists such as "Fun Home, Squirrel Mother," and "Persepolis, Daddy's Girl" should receive serious media attention and find a responsive readership.
Main Description
A new edition of a long out-of-print Fantagraphics classic.
Main Description
A new edition of a long out-of-print Fantagraphics classic. Fantagraphics Books is proud to re-release one of the most powerful and moving books in its distinguished publishing history: Debbie Drechsler's first collection of short comic stories,Daddy's Girl. Originally published in 1995 and distributed only to comic book specialty stores,Daddy's Girlwas ahead of its time: Two years beforeThe Kiss, Kathryn Harrison's critically acclaimed story of her incestuous relationship with her father, Dreschler's account of her abuse at the hands of her father, told from the point of view of an adolescent, is one of the most searingly honest, empathetic, and profoundly disturbing uses of the comics medium in its history. Rendered entirely in black and white, Drechsler's meticulous brush lines gather into heavy textures that suggest the claustrophobic tension of the environment that threatens her pre-teen and adolescent female protagonists. Characters such as Lily, who can't escape her father's abuse, and Franny, a girl whose desire to be accepted leads her into dangerous territory, struggle not to be visually and emotionally overwhelmed. Both girls are rendered in chunky, rounded lines, as if they've been shaped by the oppressive weight of their blandly suburban milieu, where pretending that everything is all right and maintaining the status quo is prized above truth and upheaval. However, Drechsler's characters also have wide-open eyes, suggesting that they still maintain their innocence, and their world does contain some beauty and hope, as long as the characters have the resolve to look for it: art and creation is offered as a form of salvation. Central to this quasi-memoir is Lily's relationship to her father--a confused jumble of fear, trepidation, and love. Drechsler's book was nominated for an Ignatz award the year it was released, and she went on to create the critically acclaimedThe Summer of Love. With the critical and commercial success of mature and uncompromising works by women cartoonists such asFun Home, Squirrel Mother, andPersepolis, Daddy's Girlshould receive serious media attention and find a responsive readership.
Main Description
Fantagraphics Books is proud to re-release one of the most powerful and moving books in its distinguished publishing history: Debbie Drechsler's first collection of short comic stories, Daddy's Girl . Originally published in 1995 and distributed only to comic book specialty stores, Daddy's Girl was ahead of its time: Two years before The Kiss , Kathryn Harrison's critically acclaimed story of her incestuous relationship with her father, Dreschler's account of her abuse at the hands of her father, told from the point of view of an adolescent, is one of the most searingly honest, empathetic, and profoundly disturbing uses of the comics medium in its history. Rendered entirely in black and white, Drechsler's meticulous brush lines gather into heavy textures that suggest the claustrophobic tension of the environment that threatens her pre-teen and adolescent female protagonists. Characters such as Lily, who can't escape her father's abuse, and Franny, a girl whose desire to be accepted leads her into dangerous territory, struggle not to be visually and emotionally overwhelmed. Both girls are rendered in chunky, rounded lines, as if they've been shaped by the oppressive weight of their blandly suburban milieu, where pretending that everything is all right and maintaining the status quo is prized above truth and upheaval. However, Drechsler's characters also have wide-open eyes, suggesting that they still maintain their innocence, and their world does contain some beauty and hope, as long as the characters have the resolve to look for it: art and creation is offered as a form of salvation. Central to this quasi-memoir is Lily's relationship to her father ”a confused jumble of fear, trepidation, and love. Drechsler's book was nominated for an Ignatz award the year it was released, and she went on to create the critically acclaimed The Summer of Love . With the critical and commercial success of mature and uncompromising works by women cartoonists such as Fun Home , Squirrel Mother , and Persepolis , Daddy's Girl should receive serious media attention and find a responsive readership.
Main Description
Fantagraphics Books is proud to re-release one of the most powerful and moving books in its distinguished publishing history: Debbie Drechsler's first collection of short comic stories, Daddy's Girl . Originally published in 1995 and distributed only to comic book specialty stores, Daddy's Girl was ahead of its time: Two years before The Kiss , Kathryn Harrison's critically acclaimed story of her incestuous relationship with her father, Dreschler's account of her abuse at the hands of her father, told from the point of view of an adolescent, is one of the most searingly honest, empathetic, and profoundly disturbing uses of the comics medium in its history. Rendered entirely in black and white, Drechsler's meticulous brush lines gather into heavy textures that suggest the claustrophobic tension of the environment that threatens her pre-teen and adolescent female protagonists. Characters such as Lily, who can't escape her father's abuse, and Franny, a girl whose desire to be accepted leads her into dangerous territory, struggle not to be visually and emotionally overwhelmed. Both girls are rendered in chunky, rounded lines, as if they've been shaped by the oppressive weight of their blandly suburban milieu, where pretending that everything is all right and maintaining the status quo is prized above truth and upheaval. However, Drechsler's characters also have wide-open eyes, suggesting that they still maintain their innocence, and their world does contain some beauty and hope, as long as the characters have the resolve to look for it: art and creation is offered as a form of salvation. Central to this quasi-memoir is Lily's relationship to her father'”a confused jumble of fear, trepidation, and love. Drechsler's book was nominated for an Ignatz award the year it was released, and she went on to create the critically acclaimed The Summer of Love . With the critical and commercial success of mature and uncompromising works by women cartoonists such as Fun Home , Squirrel Mother , and Persepolis , Daddy's Girl should receive serious media attention and find a responsive readership.
Main Description
The re-release of Debbie Drechsler's first collection of short comic stories, Daddy's Girl. Her account of her father's abuse, told from the point of view of an adolescent, is one of the most honest, empathetic and profoundly disturbing uses of the comic medium in its history. With the recent critical and commercial success of mature and uncompromising works by women cartoonists such as Fun Home, We Are On Our Own and Persepolis, Daddy's Girl should find a responsive readership.

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