Catalogue


Gender and the making of modern medicine in colonial Egypt /
Hibba Abugideiri.
imprint
Farnham, Surrey : Ashgate, c2010.
description
xii, 268 p.
ISBN
9780754667209 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Farnham, Surrey : Ashgate, c2010.
isbn
9780754667209 (hardcover : alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction, Egyptian gender, medicine, and nationalism -- Muhammad Ali's Egypt : the rise of modern medicine -- Colonizing Egyptian education : creating an Anglo-Egyptian civil service -- Anglicizing state medicine : the rebirth of Qasr al-Aini -- Hakimas, dayas, and the state : displacing women in the name of modern medicine -- A modern medical profession at last : the rise of the Egyptian doctor -- Egyptian doctors and domestic medicine : the forging of republican motherhood -- Conclusion, Egyptian nationalism, medicine, and the scientization of culture.
catalogue key
7360525
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2011
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Summaries
Main Description
Doctors, Midwives and Nationalism investigates the use of medicine as a 'tool of Empire' to serve the state building processes in Egypt by the British colonial administration, which effectively transformed Egyptian medical practice and medical knowledge in ways that were decidedly gendered.
Main Description
Doctors, Midwives and Nationalism investigates the use of medicine as a 'tool of Empire' to serve the state building processes in Egypt by the British colonial administration, which effectively transformed Egyptian medical practice and medical knowledge in ways that were decidedly gendered. The book shows how the introduction of colonial medical practices ultimately gendered Egyptian medicine in ways that privileged Egyptian men and masculinity, whilst relegating Egyptian women to maternal roles in the domicile. Thus, by interrogating how colonial medicinal was constituted, the book reveals how the rise of the modern state determined the social formation of native elites in ways directly tied to the formation of modern gender identities, and gender inequalities, in colonial Egypt.
Long Description
Gender and the Making of Modern Medicine in Colonial Egypt investigates the use of medicine as a 'tool of empire' to serve the state building process in Egypt by the British colonial administration. It argues that the colonial state effectively transformed Egyptian medical practice and medical knowledge in ways that were decidedly gendered. On the one hand, women medical professionals who had once trained as 'doctresses' (hakimas) were now restricted in their medical training and therefore saw their social status decline despite colonial modernity's promise of progress. On the other hand, the introduction of colonial medicine gendered Egyptian medicine in ways that privileged men and masculinity. Far from being totalized colonial subjects, Egyptian doctors paradoxically reappropriated aspects of Victorian science to forge an anticolonial nationalist discourse premised on the Egyptian woman as mother of the nation. By relegating Egyptian women - whether as midwives or housewives - to maternal roles in the home, colonial medicine was determinative in diminishing what control women formerly exercised over their profession, homes and bodies through its medical dictates to care for others. By interrogating how colonial medicine was constituted, Hibba Abugideiri reveals how the rise of the modern state configured the social formation of native elites in ways directly tied to the formation of modern gender identities, and gender inequalities, in colonial Egypt.
Long Description
Gender And The Making of Modern Medicine in Colonial Egypt investigates the use of medicine as a 'tool of Empire' to serve the state building processes in Egypt by the British colonial administration, which effectively transformed Egyptian medical practice and medical knowledge in ways that were decidedly gendered. The book unfolds its arguments by focusing on the changes brought by British reforms to two pre-colonial Egyptian institutions: Qasr al-Aini And The School of Midwifery. Under British rule, and mirroring the structure of similar institutions in London, these two previously independent schools were brought into a single hierarchical medical program in which Qasr al-Aini was given primacy. This meant that Qasr al-Aini, which only admitted males, dispensed the highest levels of medical training to men, while students in the School of Midwifery, who had previously trained as 'doctresses' (hakimahs), were now restricted to studying the subordinate fields of midwifery and nursing. Women medical professionals, In other words, were trained to be doctors' assistants and medical caretakers and therefore saw their social status decline despite colonial modernity's promise of progress. The book shows how the introduction of colonial medical practices ultimately gendered Egyptian medicine in ways that privileged Egyptian men and masculinity. By relegating Egyptian women - whether as midwives or as housewives - to maternal roles in the domicile, colonial medicine was determinative in diminishing what control women formerly exercised over their profession, their homes and their bodies through its medical dictates to care for others, For the sake of the nation. Thus, by interrogating how colonial medicinal was constituted, Gender And The Making of Modern Medicine in Colonial Egypt reveals how the rise of the modern state determined the social formation of native elites in ways directly tied To The formation of modern gender identities, and gender inequalities, In colonial Egypt.
Long Description
Doctors, Midwives and Nationalism investigates the use of medicine as a 'tool of Empire' to serve the state building processes in Egypt by the British colonial administration, which effectively transformed Egyptian medical practice and medical knowledge in ways that were decidedly gendered. The book unfolds its arguments by focusing on the changes brought by British reforms to two pre-colonial Egyptian institutions: Qasr al-Aini and the School of Midwifery. Under British rule, and mirroring the structure of similar institutions in London, these two previously independent schools were brought into a single hierarchical medical program in which Qasr al-Aini was given primacy. This meant that Qasr al-Aini, which only admitted males, dispensed the highest levels of medical training to men, while students in the School of Midwifery, who had previously trained as 'doctresses' (hakimahs), were now restricted to studying the subordinate fields of midwifery and nursing. Women medical professionals, in other words, were trained to be doctors' assistants and medical caretakers and therefore saw their social status decline despite colonial modernity's promise of progress. The book shows how the introduction of colonial medical practices ultimately gendered Egyptian medicine in ways that privileged, paradoxically enough, Egyptian men and masculinity. Conversely by relegating Egyptian women - whether as midwives or as housewives - to maternal roles in the domicile, colonial medicine was determinative in diminishing what control women formerly exercised over their profession, their homes and their bodies through its medical dictates to care for others, for the sake of the nation. Thus, by interrogating how colonial medicinal was constituted, Doctors, Midwives and Nationalism reveals how the rise of the modern state determined the social formation of native elites in ways directly tied to the formation of modern gender identities, and gender inequalities, in colonial Egypt.
Long Description
Gender and the Making of Modern Medicine in Colonial Egypt investigates the use of medicine as a 'tool of Empire' to serve the state building processes in Egypt by the British colonial administration, which effectively transformed Egyptian medical practice and medical knowledge in ways that were decidedly gendered. This book unfolds its arguments by focusing on the changes brought by British reforms to two pre-colonial Egyptian institutions: Qasr al-Aini and the School of Midwifery. Under British rule, and mirroring the structure of similar institutions in London, these two previously independent schools were brought into a single hierarchical medical program in which Qasr al-Aini was given primacy. This meant that Qasr al-Aini, which only admitted males, dispensed the highest levels of medical training to men, while students in the School of Midwifery, who had previously trained as 'doctresses' (hakimahs), were now restricted to studying the subordinate fields of midwifery and nursing. Women medical professionals, in other words, were trained to be doctors' assistants and medical caretakers, and therefore saw their social status decline despite colonial modernity's promise of progress. This book shows how the introduction of colonial medical practices ultimately gendered Egyptian medicine in ways that privileged Egyptian men and masculinity. By relegating Egyptian women - whether as midwives or as housewives - to maternal roles in the domicile, colonial medicine was determinative in diminishing what control women formerly exercised over their profession, their homes and their bodies through its medical dictates to care for others, for the sake of the nation. Thus, by interrogating how colonial medicinal was constituted, Gender and the Making of Modern Medicine in Colonial Egypt reveals how the rise of the modern state determined the social formation of native elites in ways directly tied to the formation of modern gender identities, and gender inequalities, in colonial Egypt.

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