Catalogue


Managing the body : beauty, health, and fitness in Britain, 1880-1939 /
Ina Zweiniger-Bargielowska.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2010.
description
xi, 394 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0199280525 (Cloth), 9780199280520 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2010.
isbn
0199280525 (Cloth)
9780199280520 (Cloth)
catalogue key
7359756
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [343]-364) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A fascinating and richly illustrated history of discourses surrounding the making of British bodies during that time...This book will undoubtedly become a major reference point for students of the history of the body and the history of medicine more generally." --American Historical Quarterly
An audaciously ambitious, carefully researched monograph...
Fantastic...an ambitious book, setting dozens of lifestyle movements deeply in a well informed vision of British social and political life...excellent
Zweiniger-Bargielowska has done historians of sport a great service ... the books overriding relevance to the history of sport is to demonstrate how physical culture was subject to wider discourses around beauty, health and fitness and that the emergence and development of modern sport was situated within these wider arguments ... This book, ... provides a framework in which they [sports historians] can engage with contemporary developments within history.
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Summaries
Long Description
Managing the Body explores the emergence of modern male and female bodies within the context of debates about racial fitness and active citizenship in Britain from the 1880s until 1939. It analyses the growing popularity of hygienic regimen or body management such as dietary restrictions, exercise, sunbathing, dress reform, and birth control to cultivate beauty, health, and fitness. These bodily disciplines were advocated by a loosely connected group of life reform andphysical culture promoters, doctors, and public health campaigners against the background of rapid urbanization, the rise of modern lifestyles, a proliferation of visual images of beautiful bodies, and eugenicist fears about racial degeneration. The author shows that body management was an essential aspect of the campaign for national efficiency before 1914. The modern nation state needed physically efficient, disciplined citizens and the promotion of hygienic practices was an integral component of the Edwardian welfare reforms. Anxieties about physical deterioration persisted after the First World War, as demonstrated by the launch of new pressure groups that aimed to transform Britain from a C3 to an A1 nation. These militarycategories became a recurrent metaphor throughout the interwar years and the virtuous habits of the healthy and fit A1 citizen were juxtaposed with those of the C3 anti-citizen, whose undisciplined lifestyle was attributed to ignorance and lack of self-control. Practices such as vegetarianism, nudism, andmen's dress reform were utopian and appealed only to a small minority, but sunbathing, hiking, and keep-fit classes became mainstream activities and they were promoted in the National Government's 'National Fitness Campaign' of the late 1930s.
Main Description
Managing the Body explores the emergence of modern male and female bodies within the context of debates about racial fitness and active citizenship in Britain from the 1880s until 1939. It analyses the growing popularity of hygienic regimen or body management such as dietary restrictions,exercise, sunbathing, dress reform, and birth control to cultivate beauty, health, and fitness. These bodily disciplines were advocated by a loosely connected group of life reform and physical culture promoters, doctors, and public health campaigners against the background of rapid urbanization, therise of modern lifestyles, a proliferation of visual images of beautiful bodies, and eugenicist fears about racial degeneration. The author shows that body management was an essential aspect of the campaign for national efficiency before 1914. The modern nation state needed physically efficient, disciplined citizens and the promotion of hygienic practices was an integral component of the Edwardian welfare reforms. Anxietiesabout physical deterioration persisted after the First World War, as demonstrated by the launch of new pressure groups that aimed to transform Britain from a C3 to an A1 nation. These military categories became a recurrent metaphor throughout the interwar years and the virtuous habits of the healthyand fit A1 citizen were juxtaposed with those of the C3 anti-citizen, whose undisciplined lifestyle was attributed to ignorance and lack of self-control. Practices such as vegetarianism, nudism, and men's dress reform were utopian and appealed only to a small minority, but sunbathing, hiking, andkeep-fit classes became mainstream activities and they were promoted in the National Government's 'National Fitness Campaign' of the late 1930s.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. x
List of Abbreviationsp. xii
Introductionp. 1
1880-1914
Modern Urban Lifestyles, Degeneration, and the Male Bodyp. 17
The Fit Male Body, Nation, and Empirep. 62
The Modern Woman as Race Motherp. 105
1918-1939
Building an 'A 1 Nation': Health and Life Reform in the 1920sp. 151
Reconstructing the Male Bodyp. 193
The Modern Female Body as a Mass Phenomenonp. 236
National Fitness in the 1930sp. 279
Conclusionp. 331
Bibliographyp. 343
Indexp. 365
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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