Catalogue


The Ópatas : in search of a Sonoran people /
David A. Yetman.
imprint
Tucson : University of Arizona Press, c2010.
description
xiv, 339 p.
ISBN
0816528977 (pbk. : alk. paper), 9780816528974 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Tucson : University of Arizona Press, c2010.
isbn
0816528977 (pbk. : alk. paper)
9780816528974 (pbk. : alk. paper)
contents note
Sonora : the Opatería -- Where they were : the land and the limits of Opatan unity -- Opatans as they were when Spaniards arrived -- The Jesuits in the Opatería -- The new conflicts : mining and miners -- The Opatería following the Jesuit expulsion -- Opatan resistance : summary and discussion -- Appendix.
catalogue key
7355657
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
David Yetman has traveled extensively in Sonora-conversing with present-day residents of the Opatera-and consulted more than two hundred archival sources in the investigation of this mystery. The result is an accessible ethnohistory of the patas, one that embraces historical complexity with an eye toward Opatan strategies of resistance and assimilation.
Excerpts
Flap Copy
Today, though their descendants presumably live on in Sonora, almost no one claims descent from the “patas. David Yetman has traveled extensively in Sonora and brings together conversations with present day residents and archival research to illuminate the culture and history of these nearly forgotten people.
Flap Copy
Today, though their descendants presumably live on in Sonora, almost no one claims descent from the Ópatas. David Yetman has traveled extensively in Sonora and brings together conversations with present day residents and archival research to illuminate the culture and history of these nearly forgotten people.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2011-08-01:
This beautifully illustrated and generally well-written book reconstructs the history of a lost group of militaristic people who lived largely in today's state of Sonora, Mexico, and across the US border in Arizona. Referred to as Opatas, they succumbed slowly, as did much of the original fauna and flora of the region, under the relentless onslaught of intrusive Spanish missionaries and miners who introduced strange plants, animals, and unfamiliar diseases. Ethnobotantist Yetman (Arizona) begins with a richly detailed description of the pre-Hispanic environment and the extensive changes brought by man, animals, and climate during the past millennia. Despite their military inclination, Opatas traded a diverse commercial inventory of cotton, maize, baskets, parrots, macaws, and feathers across a wide area of the Mexican northwest. The Jesuits established missions in the valleys of Sonora, but they and their successors, the Franciscans, constantly competed with miners anxious to exploit the metallic ores of the local mountains. Both groups, aided by ravaging attacks from horse-riding Apaches and Comanches, contributed to the inexorable disintegration of Opatan communities. By the middle of the 20th century, the Opatas had retreated to memory and legends. Summing Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. F. W. Knight Johns Hopkins University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This book brings together a tremendous number of historical sources to paint a picture of the Opatas, a group that has been largely neglected in academic literature. It should serve as a key historical reference to fellow scholars as well as the general reader." -Kirstin Erickson, author of Yaqui Homeland and Homeplace: The Everyday Production of Ethnic Identity
"This book brings together a tremendous number of historical sources to paint a picture of the Ópatas, a group that has been largely neglected in academic literature. It should serve as a key historical reference to fellow scholars as well as the general reader." Kirstin Erickson, author of Yaqui Homeland and Homeplace: The Everyday Production of Ethnic Identity
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, August 2011
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
In 1600 they were the largest, most technologically advanced indigenous group in northwest Mexico, but today, though their descendants presumably live on in Sonora, almost no one claims descent from the Opatas. The Opatas seem to have "disappeared" as an ethnic group, their languages forgotten except for the names of the towns, plants, and geography of the Opateria, where they lived. Why did the Opatas disappear from the historical record while their neighbors survived? David Yetman, a leading ethnobotanist who has traveled extensively in Sonora, consulted more than two hundred archival sources to answer this question. The result is an accessible ethnohistory of the Opatas, one that embraces historical complexity with an eye toward Opatan strategies of resistance and assimilation. Yetmans account takes us through the Opatans initial encounters with the conquistadors, their resettlement in Jesuit missions, clashes with Apaches, their recruitment as miners, and several failed rebellions, and ultimately arrives at an explanation for their "disappearance." Yetmans account is bolstered by conversations with present-day residents of the Opateria and includes a valuable appendix on the languages of the Opateria by linguistic anthropologist David Shaul. One of the few studies devoted exclusively to this indigenous group, " The Opatas: In Search of a Sonoran People" marks a significant contribution to the literature on the history of the greater Southwest.
Main Description
In 1600 they were the largest, most technologically advanced indigenous group in northwest Mexico, but today, though their descendants presumably live on in Sonora, almost no one claims descent from the Opatas. The Opatas seem to have "disappeared" as an ethnic group, their languages forgotten except for the names of the towns, plants, and geography of the Opateria, where they lived. Why did the Opatas disappear from the historical record while their neighbors survived? David Yetman, a leading ethnobotanist who has traveled extensively in Sonora, consulted more than two hundred archival sources to answer this question. The result is an accessible ethnohistory of the Opatas, one that embraces historical complexity with an eye toward Opatan strategies of resistance and assimilation. Yetman's account takes us through the Opatans' initial encounters with the conquistadors, their resettlement in Jesuit missions, clashes with Apaches, their recruitment as miners, and several failed rebellions, and ultimately arrives at an explanation for their "disappearance." Yetman's account is bolstered by conversations with present-day residents of the Opateria and includes a valuable appendix on the languages of the Opateria by linguistic anthropologist David Shaul. One of the few studies devoted exclusively to this indigenous group, The Opatas: In Search of a Sonoran People marks a significant contribution to the literature on the history of the greater Southwest.
Main Description
In 1600 they were the largest, most technologically advanced indigenous group in northwest Mexico, but today, though their descendants presumably live on in Sonora, almost no one claims descent from the “patas. The “patas seem to have "disappeared" as an ethnic group, their languages forgotten except for the names of the towns, plants, and geography of the Opater a, where they lived. Why did the “patas disappear from the historical record while their neighbors survived? David Yetman, a leading ethnobotanist who has traveled extensively in Sonora, consulted more than two hundred archival sources to answer this question. The result is an accessible ethnohistory of the “patas, one that embraces historical complexity with an eye toward Opatan strategies of resistance and assimilation. Yetman's account takes us through the Opatans' initial encounters with the conquistadors, their resettlement in Jesuit missions, clashes with Apaches, their recruitment as miners, and several failed rebellions, and ultimately arrives at an explanation for their "disappearance." Yetman's account is bolstered by conversations with present-day residents of the Opater a and includes a valuable appendix on the languages of the Opater a by linguistic anthropologist David Shaul. One of the few studies devoted exclusively to this indigenous group, The “patas: In Search of a Sonoran People marks a significant contribution to the literature on the history of the greater Southwest.
Table of Contents
List of Mapsp. vi
List of Figuresp. vii
List of Platesp. viii
Prefacep. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Sonora: The Opateriap. 1
Where They Were: The Land and the Limits of Opatan Unityp. 19
Opatans as They Were When Spaniards Arrivedp. 45
The Jesuits in the Opateríap. 81
The New Conflicts: Mining and Minersp. 151
The Opatería Following the Jesuit Expulsionp. 177
Opatan Resistance: Summary and Discussionp. 223
Appendix: The Languages of the Opateríap. 259
Notesp. 273
Referencesp. 317
Indexp. 329
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem