Catalogue


Medicine and society in early modern Europe /
Mary Lindemann.
edition
Second edition.
imprint
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2010.
description
xii, 300 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0521732565 (Paper), 9780521732567 (Paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2010.
isbn
0521732565 (Paper)
9780521732567 (Paper)
abstract
"Medicine and Society in Early Modern Europe offers students a concise introduction to health and healing in Europe from 1500 to 1800. Bringing together the best recent research in the field, Mary Lindemann examines medicine from a social and cultural perspective, rather than a narrowly scientific one. Drawing on medical anthropology, sociology and ethics as well as cultural and social history, she focuses on the experience of illness and on patients and folk healers as much as on the rise of medical science, doctors and hospitals. This second edition has been updated and revised throughout in content, style, and interpretations and new material has been added, in particular, on colonialism, exploration and women. Accessibly written and full of fascinating insights, this will be essential reading for all students of the history of medicine and will provide invaluable context for students of early modern Europe more generally"--Provided by publisher.
catalogue key
7355375
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Mary Lindemann is Professor of History at the University of Miami. Her publications include Health and Healing in Eighteenth-Century Germany (1996), which was awarded the 1998 William Welch Book Medal Prize by the American Association for the History of Medicine.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2011-03-01:
Oriented to undergraduates, the "New Approaches to European History" textbooks examine their subjects within historical and historiographical contexts. Lindemann (Univ. of Miami), who clearly meets the series' goal with this volume, continues what she began in the first edition (CH, Jun'00, 37-5704) by reviewing medical-historical scholarship in light of the past decade's research and updating accordingly. Beginning in the 1970s, scholars who broke with amateur or Whiggish perspectives on medicine's history emerged. They focused on medicine in context: history was no longer a story in thrall either to the battle between superstition and reason or to farsighted physicians. Lindemann introduces readers to the variety and depth of the recent history of medicine, which sees medicine as embedded in social and cultural networks of meaning. While the author herself admits that bashing older perspectives is tempting, she recognizes that these perspectives still have merit in challenging historians to once again examine the foundations of their work. With chapters ranging from "Sickness and Health" to "Healing," she ranges broadly over early modern history and demonstrates not only that medicine has played a role in shaping society but also that society has played a role in shaping medicine. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-level undergraduates through faculty/researchers. T. P. Gariepy Stonehill College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"...valuable resource and should be on the reading lists of relevant courses." -Sara Read, Canadian Bulletin of Medical History
"Recommended."Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 2011
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Medicine and Society in Early Modern Europe offers students a concise introduction to health and healing in Europe from 1500 to 1800. The second edition has been updated and revised throughout in content, style, and interpretations and new material has been added, in particular, on colonialism, exploration and women.
Main Description
Medicine and Society in Early Modern Europe offers students a concise introduction to health and healing in Europe from 1500 to 1800. Bringing together the best recent research in the field, Mary Lindemann examines medicine from a social and cultural perspective, rather than a narrowly scientific one. Drawing on medical anthropology, sociology and ethics as well as cultural and social history, she focuses on the experience of illness and on patients and folk healers as much as on the rise of medical science, doctors and hospitals. This second edition has been updated and revised throughout in content, style, and interpretations and new material has been added, in particular, on colonialism, exploration and women. Accessibly written and full of fascinating insights, this will be essential reading for all students of the history of medicine and will provide invaluable context for students of early modern Europe more generally.
Table of Contents
List of figuresp. x
List of tablesp. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xii
Introductionp. 1
Sickness and healthp. 11
Plagues and peoplesp. 50
Learned medicinep. 84
Learning to healp. 121
Hospitals and asylumsp. 157
Health and societyp. 193
Healingp. 235
Conclusionp. 281
Further readingp. 284
Indexp. 294
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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