Catalogue


House of faith or enchanted forest? : American popular belief in an age of reason /
Charles W. Hedrick.
imprint
Eugene, Or. : Cascade Books, c2009.
description
xvii, 98 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
1606080067 (pbk.), 9781606080061 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Eugene, Or. : Cascade Books, c2009.
isbn
1606080067 (pbk.)
9781606080061 (pbk.)
contents note
God in the American streets -- The Bible in American culture -- Religion, self, and life in America -- Does absolute truth exist? -- Superstition, magic, and modern faith -- Death and dying -- Holy days and religious feasts -- Postscript: Reason and faith.
general note
Essays published from 1986 to 2006 as Religion and Ethics editorials in the Springfield news-leader.
catalogue key
7354101
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 97-98).
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Charles W. Hedrick is Distinguished Profesor of Religion Emeritus at Missouri State University. He is also the author of Parables as Poetic Fiction, When History and Faith Collide, and Many Things in Parables
Summaries
Main Description
Since the Renaissance of the fourteenth through seventeenth centuries, and particularly since the Enlightenment of the eighteenth century, the ancient creeds of faith have been under serious fire, and the struggle has not gone well for popular religion in America. The rapid advances made by the physical sciences in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and the corresponding reliance on scientific accomplishments in American life have been matched by the growing influence of reason in the way Americans think about religion. Except for pockets of resistance, these developments have negatively influenced the practical role of traditional religion in American life.
Main Description
Since the Renaissance of the 14th through 17th centuries, and particularly since the Enlightenment of the 18th century, the ancient creeds of faith have been under serious fire, and the struggle has not gone well for popular religion in America. The rapid advances made by the physical sciences in the 19th and 20th centuries and the corresponding reliance on scientific accomplishments in American life have been matched by the growing influence of reason in the way Americans think about religion. Except for pockets of resistance, these developments have negatively influenced the practical role of traditional religion in American life. These essays-published over a twenty-year period as newspaper editorials addressed to the general public-confront popular beliefs and morals with the challenge of human reason. At issue in this meeting of faith and reason is nothing less than the nature of religion in the twenty-first century. Will faith embrace reason to create a House where both dwell in harmony or will faith ignore the claims of reason and continue to live in an Enchanted Forest? Each essay, written in the practical language of the streets, attempts to dialogue with the general reader and gently provoke critical thinking on sensitive issues of belief.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Introductionp. xiii
God in the American Streetsp. 1
The Bible in American Culturep. 17
Religion, Self, and Life in Americap. 24
Does Absolute Truth Exist?p. 43
Superstition, Magic, and Modern Faithp. 53
Death and Dyingp. 60
Holy Days and Religious Feastsp. 70
Postscript: Reason and Faithp. 78
Endnotesp. 83
Glossaryp. 95
Selected Bibliographyp. 97
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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