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The plagiarism allegation in English literature from Butler to Sterne /
Richard Terry.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
description
viii, 215 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0230272673 (hardback), 9780230272675 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
isbn
0230272673 (hardback)
9780230272675 (hardback)
catalogue key
7351969
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Richard Terry is currently Professor of Eighteenth-Century English Literature at Northumbria University, UK, having worked for many years previously at the University of Sunderland. He has written numerous articles on aspects of eighteenth-century literature. His monograph Poetry and the Making of the English Literary Past 1660-1781 was published in 2001.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2011-07-01:
"Plagiarism studies" has gained ground in recent years, with works like Brean Hammond's Professional Imaginative Writing in England, 1670-1740: "Hackney for Bread" (1997), Paulina Kewes's Authorship and Appropriation: Writing for the Stage in England, 1660-1710 (1998), and Plagiarism in Early Modern England, ed. by Kewes (2003), linking plagiarism to the rise of copyright law. Terry (Northumbria Univ., UK) thinks the connection to intellectual property has been overstated, and instead situates plagiarism allegations among shifting Restoration and 18th-century ideas about originality, imitation, and creativity. His concern is not merely whether plagiarists were committing an offense; he is interested in exactly what the offense consisted of, whether it was a moral or an aesthetic failing. Terry departs from others' approaches by focusing on the offenses actually identified as "plagiarism" at the time: too often critics have lumped together all sorts of imitation, but Terry pays careful attention to the terms used by contemporaneous accusers. The style--always lively and accessible--and the attention to major figures, including John Dryden, Jonathan Swift, Alexander Pope, Sarah Fielding, Samuel Johnson, and Charlotte Smith, make the book must reading. Summing Up: Essential. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. J. T. Lynch Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Newark
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 2011
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Contributing to the growth in plagiarism studies, this book highlights the impact of the allegation of plagiarism on the working lives of some of the major writers of the long eighteenth century, and considers plagiarism in relation to the emergence of literary copyright and the aesthetic of originality.
Description for Bookstore
This book examines the incidence of allegations of plagiarism in English Literature between Butler and Sterne and examined plagiarism more broadly in the context of the long eighteenth-century
Long Description
Contributing to the growth of plagiarism studies, this timely new book examines the incidence of allegations of plagiarism in English Literature between Butler and Sterne. A distinctive element of the work is its stress on how occurrences of plagiarism are invariably brought to light by the casting of an aspersion, and the book sees such aspersions as a largely perennial form of detraction amongst authors. Yet the exact purport of the accusation can never be taken for granted. Terry's study explores why such allegations came to be made, what forms and degrees of literary wrongdoing counted as plagiarism, and how the understanding of the offence changed in the century or so following the Restoration. In particular, he argues that the idea of plagiarism was constantly worked upon by the boundary-pressure exerted by a range of neighbouring or antithetical concepts, such as originality or the notion of literary 'sufficiency'. This study also documents the impact of the allegation on the working lives of some of the major writers of the period.
Long Description
Contributing to the growth of plagiarism studies, this timely new book examines the incidence of allegations of plagiarism in English Literature between Butler and Sterne. A distinctive element of the work is its stress on how occurrences of plagiarism are invariably brought to light by the casting of an aspersion, and the book sees such aspersions as a largely perennial form of detraction amongst authors. Yet the exact purport of the accusation can never be taken for granted. Terry's study explores why such allegations came to be made, what forms and degrees of literary wrongdoing counted as plagiarism, and how the understanding of the offence changed in the century or so following the Restoration. In particular, he argues that the idea of plagiarism was constantly worked upon by the boundary-pressure exerted by a range of neighbouring or antithetical concepts, such as originality or the notion of literary 'sufficiency'. This study also documents the impact of the allegation on the working lives of some of the major writers of the period.  
Main Description
Contributing to the growth in plagiarism studies, this timely new book highlights the impact of the allegation of plagiarism on the working lives of some of the major writers of the period, and considers plagiarism in relation to the emergence of literary copyright and the aesthetic of originality.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. viii
Introductionp. 1
'Plagiarism': The Emergence of a Literary Conceptp. 10
Plagiarism, Authorial Fame and Proprietary Authorshipp. 24
Plagiarism and the Burden of Tradition in Dryden and Othersp. 46
Plagiarism and Sufficiency in the English 'Battle of the Books'p. 59
Pope and Plagiarismp. 80
Johnson and the Lauder Affairp. 98
The Plagiarism Allegation and the Female Authorp. 117
Plagiarism, Imitation and Originalityp. 133
Sterne: The Plagiarist as Geniusp. 152
Epiloguep. 169
Notesp. 172
Bibliographyp. 195
Indexp. 206
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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