Catalogue


Greek popular religion in Greek philosophy /
Jon D. Mikalson.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2010.
description
xii, 302 p. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
0199577838 (hbk.), 9780199577835 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2010.
isbn
0199577838 (hbk.)
9780199577835 (hbk.)
catalogue key
7344027
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [252]-262) and indexes.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Jon D. Mikalson examines how Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, and other Greek philosophers described, interpreted, criticized, and utilized the components and concepts of the religion of the people of their time. Previous studies of religion in the philosophers have concentrated on their new theologies and their criticisms of the mythological gods of Greek poetry. Mikalson, however, investigates the philosophers' treatments of the religious beliefs and practices of their contemporaries-chiefly sacrifice, prayer, dedications, and divination. The major concepts involved are those of piety and impiety, and after a thorough analysis of the philosophical texts Mikalson offers a refined definition of Greek piety, dividing it into its two constituent elements of 'proper respect' for the gods and 'religious correctness'. He concludes with a demonstration of the benevolence of the gods in the philosophical tradition, linking it to the expectation of that benevolence evinced by popular religion.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"I found this to be an interesting and informative book, both to those seeking better understanding of popular religion in ancient Greece and to those seeking better understanding of the philosophers' writings."--Miriam Byrd,Southern Humanities Review
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This is a study of how Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, and other Greek philosophers described, interpreted, criticized, and utilized the components and concepts of the religion of the people of their time. These include the practices of sacrifice, prayer, dedications, and divination, and the governing concepts of piety and impiety.
Long Description
Jon D. Mikalson examines how Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, and other Greek philosophers described, interpreted, criticized, and utilized the components and concepts of the religion of the people of their time - practices such as sacrifice, prayer, dedications, and divination. The chief concepts involved are those of piety and impiety, and after a thorough analysis of the philosophical texts Mikalson offers a refined definition of Greek piety, dividing it into its two constituentelements of 'proper respect' for the gods and 'religious correctness'. He concludes with a demonstration of the benevolence of the gods in the philosophical tradition, linking it to the expectation of that benevolence evinced by popular religion.
Main Description
Jon D. Mikalson examines how Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, and other Greek philosophers described, interpreted, criticized, and utilized the components and concepts of the religion of the people of their time - practices such as sacrifice, prayer, dedications, and divination. The chief conceptsinvolved are those of piety and impiety, and after a thorough analysis of the philosophical texts Mikalson offers a refined definition of Greek piety, dividing it into its two constituent elements of 'proper respect' for the gods and 'religious correctness'. He concludes with a demonstration of thebenevolence of the gods in the philosophical tradition, linking it to the expectation of that benevolence evinced by popular religion.
Table of Contents
Abbreviationsp. x
Introductionp. 1
'Service to the Gods'p. 29
Prayer, Sacrifice, Festivals, Dedications, and Priests in 'Service to the Gods'p. 43
Divination and Its Range of Influencep. 110
'Proper Respect for the Gods' and 'Religious Correctness'p. 140
'Religious Correctness' and Justicep. 187
Philosophers and the Benevolence of the Greek Godsp. 208
Appendix: Polling the Greeks and Their Philosophersp. 242
Referencesp. 252
Index of passages citedp. 263
General indexp. 284
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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