Catalogue


Epitácio Pessoa : Brazil /
Michael Streeter.
imprint
London : Haus, 2010.
description
192 p. : ill., map, port. ; 20 cm.
ISBN
9781905791866 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
London : Haus, 2010.
isbn
9781905791866 (hbk.)
catalogue key
7341933
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'What an intellectual feast Alan Sharp and his collaborators have served us with this comprehensive treatment of the peace conferences that ended the Great War! What makes this series an important contribution to the historical literature are the distinguished roster of contributors, the careful attention devoted to persons and events not only in Europe and America but also in the non-Western world, and the illuminating demonstration of how this critical turning point in modern world history shaped the rest of the twentieth century and beyond.' William R. Keylor Professor of History and International Relations Director, International History Institute, Boston University 'As a glance at the table of contents shows, there are always more and interesting things to be said on the perennially fascinating question of the Paris Peace Conference. Sadly, too, there is much that is still relevant for our own troubled world.' Margaret Macmillan Warden, St. Antony's College, Oxford University, author of 'Peacemakers' (John Murray, 2001)
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Epitacio Pessoa's presidency ended in failure in 1922, its modest achievements overshadowed by bitter army revolts. This is the story of Pessoa, the Treaty of Versailles and the rise and fall of Brazil's tumultuous First Republic.
Main Description
A broad and deatiled study of Brazil's First Republic and its representation at Versailles.
Main Description
Brazil was one of the emerging world powers to be invited to the Paris Peace Conference in 1919. Having jettisoned her empire just thirty years before, the Portuguese-speaking nation was showing signs of becoming one of the financial powerhouses not just of Latin America, but of the world.
Main Description
Epitácio Pessoa (1865-1942). Brazil was one of the emerging world powers to be invited to the Paris Peace Conference in 1919. Having jettisoned her empire just thirty years before, the Portuguese-speaking nation was showed signs of becoming one of the financial powerhouses not just of Latin America, but of the world. In Paris, the country's delegation was led by Epitácio Pessoa, a brilliant lawyer who negotiated a deal to rescue Brazilian coffee from the German ports where it had languished since the middle of the war. He also helped win a place at the top table for Brazil in the new League of Nations. Pessoa was then rewarded by being elected president of Brazil - even though he was in Paris at the time. Yet even as Brazil enjoyed its moment of triumph on the international stage, the country's political system was starting to unravel. Pessoa's presidency ended in failure in 1922, its modest achievements overshadowed by bitter army revolts. This, then, is the story of Epitácio Pessoa, the Treaty of Versailles and the rise and fall of Brazil's tumultuous First Republic.

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