Catalogue

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Through a forest of chancellors : fugitive histories in Liu Yuan's Lingyan ge, an illustrated book from seventeenth-century Suzhou /
Anne Burkus-Chasson.
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Asia Center for the Harvard-Yenching Institute, 2010.
description
xxx, 378 p.
ISBN
0674032802 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780674032804 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Asia Center for the Harvard-Yenching Institute, 2010.
isbn
0674032802 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780674032804 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Figures -- Introduction -- Pt. 1. The composition of the book. 1. The gallery of portraits re-created -- Liu Yuan's cover leaf -- Prefatory autographs -- The preface writers license the pictorial book -- The list of contents -- Lingyan Ge, the historical site -- 2. Composing the vassal's figure -- Unordinary images -- Physiognomic fantasies -- Costumes in disarray -- Under the guise of bandits -- 3. The act of turning the leaf -- Structures of the book -- Re-reading Du Fu -- The damask at leaf's edge -- Pt. II. The publication of the book. 4. Painter, publisher, reader-viewer : whose gallery? -- The "social drama" of the Ming-Qing transition / Liu Yuan and Tong Pengnian -- A model for community : echoing voices among the preface writers -- Climbing Yingzhou : Wu Weiye's response -- 5. Vexations of passage -- Variant endings -- Maxims, furtively impressed -- In the hands of all the masters -- From manuscript to printed book --- Appendix. Liu Yuan's Lingyan ge with annotated translations -- Reference matter -- Notes -- Works cited -- Character list -- Index.
catalogue key
7341200
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2010
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This study examines the dialogues created among the texts and images in Lingyan ge from multiple perspectives. Analysis of the book's materialities demonstrates how Lingyan ge embodies, rather than reflects, the historical moment in which it was made.
Main Description
Liu Yuan's Lingyan ge, a woodblock-printed book from 1669, re-creates a portrait gallery that memorialized 24 vassals of the early Tang court. Liu accompanied each figure, presented under the guise of a bandit, with a couplet; the poems, written in various scripts, are surrounded by marginal images that allude to a contemporary novel. Religious icons supplement the portrait gallery. Liu's re-creation is fraught with questions. This study examines the dialogues created among the texts and images in Lingyan ge from multiple perspectives. Analysis of the book's materialities demonstrates how Lingyan ge embodies, rather than reflects, the historical moment in which it was made. Liu unveiled and even dramatized the interface between manuscript and printed book in Lingyan ge. Authority over the book's production is negotiated, asserted, overturned, and reinstated. Use of pictures to construct a historical argument intensifies this struggle. Anne Burkus-Chasson argues that despite a general epistemological shift toward visual forms of knowledge in the seventeenth century, looking and reading were still seen as being in conflict. This conflict plays out among the leaves of Liu Yuan's book.
Main Description
Liu Yuan's Lingyan ge, a woodblock-printed book from 1669, re-creates a portrait gallery that memorialized 24 vassals of the early Tang court. Liu accompanied each figure, presented under the guise of a bandit, with a couplet; the poems, written in various scripts, are surrounded by marginal images that allude to a contemporary novel. Religious icons supplement the portrait gallery. Liu's re-creation is fraught with questions. This study examines the dialogues created among the texts and images in Lingyan ge from multiple perspectives. Analysis of the book's materialities demonstrates how Lingyan ge embodies, rather than reflects, the historical moment in which it was made.Liu unveiled and even dramatized the interface between manuscript and printed book in Lingyan ge. Authority over the book's production is negotiated, asserted, overturned, and reinstated. Use of pictures to construct a historical argument intensifies this struggle. Anne Burkus-Chasson argues that despite a general epistemological shift toward visual forms of knowledge in the seventeenth century, looking and reading were still seen as being in conflict. This conflict plays out among the leaves of Liu Yuan's book.
Main Description
Liu Yuan’s Lingyan ge, a woodblock-printed book from 1669, re-creates a portrait gallery that memorialized 24 vassals of the early Tang court. Liu accompanied each figure, presented under the guise of a bandit, with a couplet; the poems, written in various scripts, are surrounded by marginal images that allude to a contemporary novel. Religious icons supplement the portrait gallery. Liu’s re-creation is fraught with questions. This study examines the dialogues created among the texts and images in Lingyan ge from multiple perspectives. Analysis of the book’s materialities demonstrates how Lingyan ge embodies, rather than reflects, the historical moment in which it was made. Liu unveiled and even dramatized the interface between manuscript and printed book in Lingyan ge. Authority over the book’s production is negotiated, asserted, overturned, and reinstated. Use of pictures to construct a historical argument intensifies this struggle. Anne Burkus-Chasson argues that despite a general epistemological shift toward visual forms of knowledge in the seventeenth century, looking and reading were still seen as being in conflict. This conflict plays out among the leaves of Liu Yuan’s book.
Main Description
Liu Yuans Lingyan ge, a woodblock-printed book from 1669, re-creates a portrait gallery that memorialized 24 vassals of the early Tang court. Liu accompanied each figure, presented under the guise of a bandit, with a couplet; the poems, written in various scripts, are surrounded by marginal images that allude to a contemporary novel. Religious icons supplement the portrait gallery. Lius re-creation is fraught with questions. This study examines the dialogues created among the texts and images in Lingyan ge from multiple perspectives. Analysis of the books materialities demonstrates how Lingyan ge embodies, rather than reflects, the historical moment in which it was made. Liu unveiled and even dramatized the interface between manuscript and printed book in Lingyan ge. Authority over the books production is negotiated, asserted, overturned, and reinstated. Use of pictures to construct a historical argument intensifies this struggle. Anne Burkus-Chasson argues that despite a general epistemological shift toward visual forms of knowledge in the seventeenth century, looking and reading were still seen as being in conflict. This conflict plays out among the leaves of Liu Yuans book.
Table of Contents
Figures
Introduction
The Composition of the Book
The Gallery of Portraits Re-created
Composing the Vassal's Figure
The Act of Turning the Leaf
The Publication of the Book
Painter, Publisher, Reader-Viewer: Whose Gallery?
Vexations of Passage
Appendix
Liu Yuan's Lingyan ge with Annotated Translations
Notes
Works Cited
Character List
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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