Catalogue


The cycle of juvenile justice /
Thomas J. Bernard and Megan C. Kurlychek.
edition
2nd. ed.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2010.
description
243 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0195370368 (pbk. : alk. paper), 9780195370362 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2010.
isbn
0195370368 (pbk. : alk. paper)
9780195370362 (pbk. : alk. paper)
contents note
Ideas and the cycle of juvenile justice -- What stays the same in history? -- The origin of juvenile delinquency -- The origin of juvenile justice : juvenile institutions -- The origin of juvenile justice : the juvenile court -- The supreme court and due process -- Adjudication hearings today : an idea that didn't sell -- Disposition hearings today : the get-tough movement -- Youths in the adult system -- Juvenile justice in the 21st century -- The lessons of history applied today -- The end of juvenile delinquency?
catalogue key
7340060
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Thomas J. Bernard was Professor of Crime, Law, and Justice at Pennsylvania State University. Megan C. Kurlychek is an Assistant Professor in the School of Criminal Justice at the University at Albany, SUNY.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2011-05-01:
The late Bernard (formerly, Pennsylvania State Univ.) and Kurlychek (Univ. at Albany, SUNY) argue in this fine book that consistent and sensible juvenile justice policy can only be accomplished by breaking the existing cycle and learning from, rather than romanticizing about, the past. They identify a three-stage cycle: first, there is a real or imagined sense among the public that juvenile crime rates are inordinately high--higher than in the "good old days"; second, there is a general conception that present policies have failed to address the problem and, in fact, have made matters worse; third, there is a push for "reform" in an effort to reduce juvenile crime. Juvenile crime rates fluctuate over time, as do rates for offenders in other age categories. As this would suggest, they eventually rise again; when they do, the cycle starts again. It has repeated in this fashion for over 200 years. In support of this argument, the book includes 12 chapters, each written in accessible, engaging prose and arranged in an especially organized fashion with a multitude of headings and subheadings to guide the reader through a systematic application of a refreshingly parsimonious model. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. B. K. Pinaire Lehigh University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"There is much to like in the second edition, including references to more contemporary data and detailed treatment of important new developments, so this revision is quite timely. I applaud the authors for a solid, effective revision of an outstanding book."--Robert Brame, Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, University of North Carolina, Charlotte "This 'hits' on all counts. This second edition revision is as engaging, easy to read, and well-argued as the first. Scholars will cite it in their research, graduate and undergraduate students will learn a great deal from it, and it will certainly enhance the efforts of many practitioners and juvenile justice officials."--Daniel P. Mears, Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Florida State University "The Cycle of Juvenile Justicewas a worthy book the first time and the second edition is an even more worthy successor."--Barry C. Feld, Professor of Law, University of Minnesota
"There is much to like in the second edition, including references to more contemporary data and detailed treatment of important new developments, so this revision is quite timely. I applaud the authors for a solid, effective revision of an outstanding book."--Robert Brame, Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, University of North Carolina, Charlotte"This 'hits' on all counts. This second edition revision is as engaging, easy to read, and well-argued as the first. Scholars will cite it in their research, graduate and undergraduate students will learn a great deal from it, and it will certainly enhance the efforts of many practitioners and juvenile justice officials."--Daniel P. Mears, Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Florida State University" The Cycle of Juvenile Justice was a worthy book the first time and the second edition is an even more worthy successor."--Barry C. Feld, Professor of Law, University of Minnesota
"There is much to like in the second edition, including references to more contemporary data and detailed treatment of important new developments, so this revision is quite timely. I applaud the authors for a solid, effective revision of an outstanding book."--Robert Brame, Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology, University of North Carolina, Charlotte "This 'hits' on all counts. This second edition revision is as engaging, easy to read, and well-argued as the first. Scholars will cite it in their research, graduate and undergraduate students will learn a great deal from it, and it will certainly enhance the efforts of many practitioners and juvenile justice officials."--Daniel P. Mears, Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Florida State University "The Cycle of Juvenile Justice was a worthy book the first time and the second edition is an even more worthy successor."--Barry C. Feld, Professor of Law, University of Minnesota "Written in accessible, engaging prose and arranged in an especially organized fashion with a multitude of headings and subheadings to guide the reader through a systematic application of a refreshingly parsimonious model. Highly recommended." --Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 2011
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
By building on & expanding the ideas of the original edition, the authors refine their demonstration of how juvenile justice policy in the U.S. undergoes cycles of reform, alternating between offender-focused & offense-focused policies.
Long Description
When juvenile violence and crime skyrocketed in the late 1980s and early 1990s, every state in the country responded by significantly altering the jurisdiction, purpose, process, sentencing, and services of their juvenile justice systems. Analyzing the history of juvenile justice over the last two hundred years, The Cycle of Juvenile Justice is an illuminating examination of the patterns in which changes like these play out. This much-needed and timely new edition providesan account of changes in the American juvenile justice system from 1990 to the present, and, by building on and expanding the ideas of the original edition, the authors refine their demonstration of how juvenile justice policy undergoes cycles of reform, alternating between offender-focused andoffense-focused policies. All of the material from the previous edition has been revised and updated, and to incorporate recent key developments in juvenile justice, many new chapters have been added . Each of these provides historical context on each change, examining the rhetoric surrounding policies and their implementation, and assesses whether the policy and system changes resulted in a perpetuation of the cycle or represents real progress and reform. Analyzing the best and worst aspectsof these policies, as well as the state of the present system, this book will continue to provide a controversial and challenging look at the issues involved in juvenile justice.
Main Description
The Cycle of Juvenile Justice takes a historical look at juvenile justice policies in the United States. Tracing a pattern of policies over the past 200 years, the book reveals cycles of reforms advocating either lenient treatment or harsh punishments for juvenile delinquents. Bernard and Kurlychek see this cycle as driven by several unchanging ideas that force us to repeat, rather than learn from, our history. This timely new edition provides a substantial update from the original, incorporating the vast policy changes from the 1990s to the present, and placing these changes in their broader historical context and their place within the cycle of juvenile justice. The authors provide a provocative and honest assessment of juvenile justice in the 21st century, arguing that no policy can solve the problem of youth crime since it arises not from the juvenile justice system, but from deeper social conditions and inequalities. With this highly-anticipated new edition, The Cycle of Juvenile Justice will continue to provide a controversial, challenging, and enlightening perspective for a broad array of juvenile justice officials, scholars, and students alike.
Main Description
When juvenile violence and crime skyrocketed in the late 1980s and early 1990s, every state in the country responded by significantly altering the jurisdiction, purpose, process, sentencing, and services of their juvenile justice systems. Analyzing the history of juvenile justice over the lasttwo hundred years, The Cycle of Juvenile Justice is an illuminating examination of the patterns in which changes like these play out. This much-needed and timely new edition provides an account of changes in the American juvenile justice system from 1990 to the present, and, by building on andexpanding the ideas of the original edition, the authors refine their demonstration of how juvenile justice policy undergoes cycles of reform, alternating between offender-focused and offense-focused policies. All of the material from the previous edition has been revised and updated, and toincorporate recent key developments in juvenile justice, many new chapters have been added . Each of these provides historical context on each change, examining the rhetoric surrounding policies and their implementation, and assesses whether the policy and system changes resulted in a perpetuationof the cycle or represents real progress and reform. Analyzing the best and worst aspects of these policies, as well as the state of the present system, this book will continue to provide a controversial and challenging look at the issues involved in juvenile justice.
Table of Contents
Ideas and the Cycle of Juvenile Justicep. 3
What Stays the Same in History?p. 10
The Origin of Juvenile Delinquencyp. 33
The Origin of Juvenile Justice: Juvenile Institutionsp. 48
The Origin of Juvenile Justice: The Juvenile Courtp. 71
The Supreme Court and Due Processp. 95
Due Process and Adjudication Hearings: An Idea That Didn't Sellp. 122
Disposition Hearings Today: The "Get Tough" Movementp. 139
Youths in the Adult Systemp. 163
Juvenile Justice in the Twenty-first Centuryp. 187
The Lessons of History Applied Todayp. 206
The End of Juvenile Delinquency?p. 232
Indexp. 237
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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