Catalogue


Cupid in early modern literature and culture /
Jane Kingsley-Smith.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2010.
description
x, 264 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
9780521767613 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2010.
isbn
9780521767613 (hardback)
contents note
Machine generated contents note: Introduction; 1. Cupid, art and idolatry; 2. Cupid, death and tragedy; 3. Cupid, chastity and rebellious women; 4. Cupid and the boy: the pleasure and pain of boy-love; 5. 'Cupid and Psyche': the return of the sacred?.
abstract
"Cupid became a popular figure in the literary and visual culture of post-Reformation England. He served to articulate and debate the new Protestant theory of desire, inspiring a dark version of love tragedy in which Cupid kills. But he was also implicated in other controversies, as the object of idolatrous, Catholic worship and as an adversary to female rule: Elizabeth I's encounters with Cupid were a crucial feature of her image-construction and changed subtly throughout her reign. Covering a wide variety of material such as paintings, emblems and jewellery, but focusing mainly on poetry and drama, including works by Sidney, Shakespeare, Marlowe and Spenser, Kingsley-Smith illuminates the Protestant struggle to categorise and control desire and the ways in which Cupid disrupted this process. An original perspective on early modern desire, the book will appeal to anyone interested in the literature, drama, gender politics and art history of the English Renaissance"--
catalogue key
7340013
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 231-259) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"It is a pity that it could not be more fully illustrated, since its historical survey includes the fascinating conflation, in the visual arts, of Venus and Cupid with Mary and Jesus." -- Studies in English Literature
"In sure-footed, economical prose the author moves back and forth between poetry, painting, and drama with great but not (we are grateful) dizzying speed." -DAVID SCOTT WILSON-OKAMURA,East Carolina University
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Cupid became a popular figure in sixteenth-century England, appearing in drama, paintings and lyric poetry. This book argues that Cupid's rise to cultural prominence was a response to the Protestant Reformation, and the debates it provoked about the 'Catholic' sins of lust and idolatry and the legitimacy of female rule.
Main Description
Cupid became a popular figure in the literary and visual culture of post-Reformation England. He served to articulate and debate the new Protestant theory of desire, inspiring a dark version of love tragedy in which Cupid kills. But he was also implicated in other controversies, as the object of idolatrous, Catholic worship and as an adversary to female rule: Elizabeth I's encounters with Cupid were a crucial feature of her image-construction and changed subtly throughout her reign. Covering a wide variety of material such as paintings, emblems and jewellery, but focusing mainly on poetry and drama, including works by Sidney, Shakespeare, Marlowe and Spenser, Kingsley-Smith illuminates the Protestant struggle to categorise and control desire and the ways in which Cupid disrupted this process. An original perspective on early modern desire, the book will appeal to anyone interested in the literature, drama, gender politics and art history of the English Renaissance.
Table of Contents
List of illustrationsp. ix
Acknowledgementsp. x
Introductionp. 1
Cupid, art and idolatryp. 24
The Cupid-idol: medieval to Renaissancep. 26
Tottel's Miscellany and Cupid-worshipp. 32
Sidney and Cupid-artp. 35
Condemning iconoclasm: the Arcadia and Cupid's Revengep. 44
Cupid and iconoclasm in The Faerie Queenep. 50
Cupid and the art of Busiranep. 54
Cupid, death and tragedyp. 60
love and death come closer togetherp. 61
Here love dies: the putto and the skullp. 62
Cupid and Death: 'De Morte & Amore'p. 64
The Cupidean plague-angelp. 71
Cupidean tragedyp. 74
Cambyses, King of Persiap. 76
Gismond of Salerne and Tancred and Gismundp. 77
Cupid's Revengep. 84
Cupid, chastity and rebellious womenp. 94
Producing female desire: Cupid and Mary Stuartp. 96
Cupid, Chastity and Timep. 98
Succumbing to Cupidp. 103
Threatening female chastity: Cupid and Elizabeth Ip. 105
Churchyard's Shew of Chastityp. 106
Sappho and Phaop. 110
A Midsummer Nights Dreamp. 112
The Faerie Queene: Belphoebe and Amoretp. 116
Displacing male desire: Cupid and Lady Mary Wrothp. 121
Pamphilia to Amphilanthusp. 123
Love's Victoryp. 128
Cupid and the boy - the pleasure and pain of boy-lovep. 133
Cupid as beautiful boyp. 135
Desiring Cupid in Italian Renaissance art: Pontormo, Bronzino, Caravaggiop. 136
Dido, Queen of Carthage and Cupid as boy actorp. 142
Cupid and effeminacy: Middleton's The Nice Valourp. 146
Cupid, sodomy and castration: Soliman and Perseda and Cupid's Whirligigp. 149
The pleasures of infantilism: Sidney vs. Grevillep. 153
Cupid and maternal nurturance on the early modern stagep. 157
'Cupid and Psyche': the return of the sacred?p. 163
Cupid and Psyche: Apuleius, Fulgentius and Boccacciop. 163
Reading Adlington's Cupidp. 166
Heywood's Love's Mistressp. 170
Cupid in the Caroline masque: Love's Triumph Through Callipolis and the Temple of Lovep. 177
Conclusion: Cupid in the English Civil Warsp. 183
Notesp. 186
Bibliographyp. 231
Indexp. 260
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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