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Looking back : Canadian women's prairie memoirs and intersections of culture, history, and identity /
S. Leigh Matthews.
imprint
Calgary, Alta. : University of Calgary Press, c2010.
description
x, 418 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
1552380963 (pbk. : alk. paper), 9781552380963 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
series title
imprint
Calgary, Alta. : University of Calgary Press, c2010.
isbn
1552380963 (pbk. : alk. paper)
9781552380963 (pbk. : alk. paper)
catalogue key
7339995
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [391]-409) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
S. Leigh Matthews is a lecturer in the Department of English and Modern Languages at Thompson Rivers University in Kamloops, British Columbia. She specializes in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Canadian literature, children's literature, life writing, eco-criticism, and the literary treatment of animals.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Addressing both the limitations and possibilities of life writing, Matthews presents a sound, well-developed and well-written case for memoir as reconciling female experience to the dominant historiography of the prairie west. Reading for 'failures and incoherences', the memoirs considered here reveal women's voices that probe a community's most cherished values and beliefs, reveal its conflicts and contradictions, and call leaders to account." -- Catherine Cavanaugh, Athabasca University
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2011
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
In this ground-breaking study, Leigh Matthews shows how a critical approach to the life-writing of individual prairie women can broaden and deepen our understanding of the settlement era.
Main Description
When we think about women settlers on the Prairies, our notions tend to veer between the nostalgic image of the "cheerful helpmate" and the grim deprivation of the "reluctant immigrant". In this ground-breaking new study, Leigh Matthews shows how a critical approach to the life-writing of individual prairie women can broaden and deepen our understanding of the settlement era. Reopening for examination a substantial body of memoirs published after 1950 but now largely out of print, Matthews engages critical and feminist theory to close the gap between our polarised stereotypes and the actual lived experiences of rural prairie women.
Main Description
When we think about women settlers on the Prairies, our notions tend to veer between the nostalgic image of the "cheerful helpmate" and the grim deprivation of the "reluctant immigrant." In this ground-breaking new study, Leigh Matthews shows how a critical approach to the life-writing of individual prairie women can broaden and deepen our understanding of the settlement era. Reopening for examination a substantial body of memoirs published after 1950 but now largely out of print, Matthews engages critical and feminist theory to close the gap between our polarized stereotypes and the actual lived experiences of rural prairie women. "Addressing both the limitations and possibilities of life writing, Matthews presents a sound, well-developed and well-written case for memoir as reconciling female experience to the dominant historiography of the prairie west. Reading for "failures and incoherences," the memoirs considered here reveal women's voices that probe a community's most cherished values and beliefs, reveal its conflicts and contradictions, and call leaders to account." Catherine Cavanaugh, Athabasca University
Main Description
When we think about women settlers on the Prairies, our notions tend to veer between the nostalgic image of the "cheerful helpmate" and the grim deprivation of the "reluctant immigrant." In this ground-breaking new study, Leigh Matthews shows how a critical approach to the life-writing of individual prairie women can broaden and deepen our understanding of the settlement era. Reopening for examination a substantial body of memoirs published after 1950 but now largely out of print, Matthews engages critical and feminist theory to close the gap between our polarized stereotypes and the actual lived experiences of rural prairie women. Addressing both the limitations and possibilities of life writing, Matthews presents a sound, well-developed and well-written case for memoir as reconciling female experience to the dominant historiography of the prairie west. Reading for "failures and incoherences," the memoirs considered here reveal women's voices that probe a community's most cherished values and beliefs, reveal its conflicts and contradictions, and call leaders to account. - Catherine Cavanaugh, Athabasca University.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introduction: ôUntilled Fieldsöp. 1
ôSeemingly Trivialö: Re-Visioning Historical Narratives of Western Settlementp. 33
ôDauntless Optimismö/ôPerverse Enduranceö: Re-Visioning Literary Narratives of Settler Womenp. 123
The ôPrecarious Perchö of the ôDecent Womanö: Re-Visioning the Space(s) of Western Settlementp. 209
ôThe landscape behind itö: Re-Visioning Some ôOtherö Subjects of Agriculturep. 301
Conclusions: ôThe Ragged Garment of Memoryöp. 387
Bibliographyp. 395
Indexp. 413
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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