Catalogue


The anatomy of influence : literature as a way of life /
Harold Bloom.
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, 2011.
description
x, 357 p.
ISBN
9780300167603 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, 2011.
isbn
9780300167603 (alk. paper)
contents note
The point of view for my work as a critic: Literary love. Sublime strangeness. The influence of a mind on itself -- Shakespeare, the founder: Shakespeare's people. The rival poet: King Lear. Shakespeare's ellipsis: The tempest. Possession in many modes: The sonnets -- Hamlet and the art of knowing. Milton's Hamlet. Joyce ... Dante ... Shakespeare ... Milton. Dr. Johnson and critical influence -- The skeptical sublime: Anxieties of Epicurean influence: Dryden, Pater, Milton, Shelley, Tennyson, Whitman, Swinburne, Stevens. Leopardi's Lucretian swerve. Shelley's heirs: Browning and Yeats. Whose condition of fire? Merrill and Yeats -- Whitman and the death of Europe in the evening land: Emerson and a poetry yet to be written. Whitman's tally. Death and the poet: Whitmanian ebbings. Notes toward a supreme fiction of the romantic self. Near the quick: Lawrence and Whitman. Hand of fire: Hart Crane's magnificence. Whitman's prodigals: Ashbery, Ammons, Merwin, Strand, Charles Wright.
catalogue key
7338972
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2011-09-01:
This finale to his illustrious career in literary criticism will not disappoint fans of Bloom (Yale). Building on the works for which he is best known--The Anxiety of Influence (CH, Sep'73) and Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human (1998), Bloom imbues this volume with his distinctive voice--it is full of personal references and extreme assertions. In the first section, "The Point of View for My Work as a Critic," the author clarifies his views--and focus--on the sublime, intertextuality, and inspiration, which are in opposition to the socioeconomic approach of scholars Blooms labels "the new cynics." In the remaining two sections, Bloom elaborates on his love of Shakespeare and Whitman and discusses other canonical writers--Joyce, Milton, Shelley, Browning, Yeats, Crane, and so forth--in conjunction with his two exemplars. Bloom's intimate connection to poets and critics of the past is apparent in the breadth and depth of knowledge he presents. He does not pretend to objectivity--some readers may be disappointed with his lack of attention to women writers and writers of color--but instead marks each page with his passion. Summing Up: Essential. All readers. L. McMillan Marywood University
Appeared in Library Journal on 2011-05-01:
As defender of the Western canon, the controversial Bloom (Sterling Professor of the Humanities, Yale Univ.; How To Read and Why) has no equal. Here he continues his investigation into literary interconnectedness by revealing how writers struggle with the works of those who came before. He cites Shakespeare as the greatest writer in the English language. Moving forward chronologically from the 16th through the 20th centuries, Bloom analyzes the works of such giants as John Milton, Samuel Johnson, Percy Bysshe Shelley, and Alfred, Lord Tennyson, illustrating their connections to Shakespeare. Bloom examines Walt Whitman's poetry in depth then considers James Joyce, D.H. Lawrence, Stephen Crane, and Wallace Stevens, as well as contemporary poets, e.g., A.R. Ammons, John Ashbery, and Mark Strand. VERDICT Unfortunately, the book lacks much serious consideration of nonwhite and women poets. Bloom acknowledges Emily Dickinson, yet never accords her the status she deserves, although Amy Clampitt's "Beach Glass" rates a short analysis. Yet his commentaries penetrate the mysteries of influence and provide enough evidence to convince those skeptical of the "Western canon" approach. Bloom's elegant and accessible writing, punctuated here with his discussions of his own experiences with these works over time, will be welcomed by serious readers who don't mind his bias.-Nancy R. Ives, SUNY at Geneseo (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
Selected as a Choice Outstanding Academic Title for 2011 in the Language and Literature category.
"This finale to his illustrious career in literary criticism will not disappoint fans of Bloom . . . Essential."L. McMillan, Choice
"Ah, then there's Harold Bloom, America's giant of a literary critic....In The Anatomy of Influence: Literature as a Way of Life, Bloom pulls off a masterly connecting of the dots through the literary canon and his own life with his usual breathtaking eloquence." Publishers Weekly
"Bloom...has many arresting things to say and says them, often, with exquisite precision. He is, by any reckoning, one of the most stimulating literary presences of the last half-centuryand one of the most protean, a singular breed of scholar-teacher-critic-prose-poet-pamphleteer...."Sam Tanenhaus, The New York Times Book Review
"Bloom pulls off a masterly connecting of the dots through the literary canon and his own life with his usual breathtaking eloquence." Publishers Weekly
"Bloom thinks in the sweep of millennia, of intellectual patterns that unfold over centuries, of a vast and intricate labyrinth of interconnections between artists from Plato to Pater."Michael Lindgren, Washington Post
"If Bloom is rightand I believe he isthat 'literary criticism . . . ought to consist in acts of appreciation,' he has fulfilled that mandate once again in The Anatomy of Influence ."Robert Pogue Harrison, New York Review of Books
Praise for Harold Bloom: "Arguably the most influential critic of the last quarter century. He elevates critical writing to the level of literature itself." New York Times Book Review
Praise for Harold Bloom: "Bloom is fighting the good fight for literature." The Observer (U.K.)
Praise for Harold Bloom: "[Bloom] is the reader as human medium, an instrument through whom inspiration strikes: in turn he renders visible the lineament of other writers' imaginations while articulating the generally inchoate and undeveloped responses of the average reader. . . . Magnificent. . . . He is never less than memorable."Peter Ackroyd, The Times (London)
Praise for Harold Bloom: "Harold Bloom is one of the greatest literary critics of his time . . . a man who like Tennyson's Ulysses is a part of all that he has read." Washington Post
Praise for Harold Bloom: "Harold Bloom reminds us what matters. He is our most valuable critic." Boston Globe
"Reading Bloom read the great writers of the canon is an immense pleasure; reading Bloom read Bloom is a revelation. Like his ideal poets, Bloom brings us fire and light, apt tools for reading in the dark."James Angelos, Ugarte
"Bloom...has many arresting things to say and says them, often, with exquisite precision. He is, by any reckoning, one of the most stimulating literary presences of the last half-centuryand one of the most protean, a singular breed of scholar-teacher-critic-prose poet-pamphleteer." Sam Tanenhaus, New York Times Book Review
"An autumnal summing-up, winding through 'the labyrinth of literary influence' to conclude, '[t]hat labyrinth is life itself.' " Kirkus Reviews
"As defender of the Western canon, the controversial Bloom has no equal. . . . Bloom''s elegant and accessible writing will be welcomed by serious readers."Nancy R. Ives, Library Journal
Bloom "has been one of America''s most fascinating literary critics for nearly half a century. In his newest book, The Anatomy of Influence: Literature as a Way of Life, Bloom revisits the ideas that made him a starand explains, in a straightforward way, why he''s spent his career trying 'to build a hedge around the secular Western canon.' "Josh Rothman, Brainiac Blog, Boston Globe
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, May 2011
New York Times Book Review, May 2011
New York Times Full Text Review, May 2011
Guardian UK, June 2011
Kirkus Reviews, July 2011
The Australian, July 2011
Choice, September 2011
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Featuring extended analyses of Bloom's most cherished poets - Shakespeare, Whitman and Crane - as well as inspired appreciations of Emerson, Tennyson, Browning, Yeats, Ashbery, and others, this text adapts Bloom's classic work 'The Anxiety of Influence' shows us what great literature is, how it comes to be, and why it matters.
Main Description
In this, his most comprehensive and accessible study of influence, Bloom leads readers through the labyrinthine paths which link the writers and critics who have informed and inspired him for so many years.
Main Description
"Literary criticism, as I attempt to practice it," writes Harold Bloom in The Anatomy of Influence , "is in the first place literary, that is to say, personal and passionate." For more than half a century, Bloom has shared his profound knowledge of the written word with students and readers. In this, his most comprehensive and accessible study of influence, Bloom leads us through the labyrinthine paths which link the writers and critics who have informed and inspired him for so many years. The result is "a critical self-portrait," a sustained meditation on a life lived with and through the great works of the Western canon: Why has influence been my lifelong obsessive concern? Why have certain writers found me and not others? What is the end of a literary life? Featuring extended analyses of Bloom's most cherished poetsShakespeare, Whitman, and Craneas well as inspired appreciations of Emerson, Tennyson, Browning, Yeats, Ashbery, and others, The Anatomy of Influence adapts Bloom's classic work The Anxiety of Influence to show us what great literature is, how it comes to be, and why it matters. Each chapter maps startling new literary connections that suddenly seem inevitable once Bloom has shown us how to listen and to read. A fierce and intimate appreciation of the art of literature on a scale that the author will not again attempt, The Anatomy of Influence follows the sublime works it studies, inspiring the reader with a sense of something ever more about to be.
Main Description
"Literary criticism, as I attempt to practice it," writes Harold Bloom inThe Anatomy of Influence, "is in the first place literary, that is to say, personal and passionate." For more than half a century, Bloom has shared his profound knowledge of the written word with students and readers. In this, his most comprehensive and accessible study of influence, Bloom leads us through the labyrinthine paths which link the writers and critics who have informed and inspired him for so many years. The result is "a critical self-portrait," a sustained meditation on a life lived with and through the great works of the Western canon:Why has influence been my lifelong obsessive concern? Why have certain writers found me and not others? What is the end of a literary life? Featuring extended analyses of Bloom's most cherished poetsShakespeare, Whitman, and Craneas well as inspired appreciations of Emerson, Tennyson, Browning, Yeats, Ashbery, and others,The Anatomy of Influenceadapts Bloom's classic workThe Anxiety of Influenceto show us what great literature is, how it comes to be, and why it matters. Each chapter maps startling new literary connections that suddenly seem inevitable once Bloom has shown us how to listen and to read. A fierce and intimate appreciation of the art of literature on a scale that the author will not again attempt,TheAnatomy of Influencefollows the sublime works it studies, inspiring the reader with a sense of something ever more about to be.
Unpaid Annotation
Bloom leads readers through the labyrinthine paths which link the writers and critics who have informed and inspired him for so many years.
Table of Contents
Praeludiump. ix
The Point of view for My Work as a Critic
Literary Lovep. 3
Sublime Strangenessp. 16
The Influence of a Mind on Itselfp. 25
Shakespeare, the Founder
Shakespeare's Peoplep. 35
The Rival Poet: King Learp. 48
Shakespeare's Ellipsis: The Tempestp. 62
Possession in Many Modes: The Sonnetsp. 78
Hamlet and the Art of Knowingp. 87
Milton's Hamletp. 94
Joyce…Dante…Shakespeare…Miltonp. 109
Dr. Johnson and Critical Influencep. 126
The Skeptical Sublime
Anxieties of Epicurean Influence: Dryden, Pater, Milton, Shelley, Tennyson, Whitman, Swinburne, Stevensp. 133
Leopardi's Lucretian Swervep. 162
Shelley's Heirs: Browning and Yeatsp. 172
Whose Condition of Fire? Merrill and Yeatsp. 194
Whitman and the Death of Europe in the Evening Land
Emerson and a Poetry Yet to Be Writtenp. 209
Whitman's Tallyp. 218
Death and the Poet: Whitmanian Ebbingsp. 235
Notes Toward a Supreme Fiction of the Romantic Selfp. 248
Near the Quick: Lawrence and Whitmanp. 255
Hand of Fire: Hart Crane's Magnificencep. 266
Whitman's Prodigals: Ashbery, Ammons, Merwin, Strand, Charles Wrightp. 294
Codap. 334
Acknowledgmentsp. 337
Creditsp. 338
Indexp. 341
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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