Catalogue


When the luck of the Irish ran out : the world's most resilient country and its struggle to rise again /
by David Lynch.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
description
248 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
9780230102736 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
isbn
9780230102736 (hbk.)
contents note
Introduction: "The boom times are getting more boomer" -- Frugal comfort -- The most important pub in Ireland -- Liftoff -- A different country -- Famine to feast -- Having it all -- People lost the run of themselves -- Money is just evidence -- Epilogue: The Ireland that we dreamed of.
abstract
"Few countries have been as dramatically transformed in recent years as Ireland. Once a culturally repressed land shadowed by terrorism and on the brink of economic collapse, Ireland finally emerged in the late 1990s as the fastest-growing country in Europe, with the typical citizen enjoying a higher standard of living than the average Brit. Just a few years after celebrating their newly-won status among the world's richest societies, the Irish are now saddled with a wounded, shrinking economy, soaring unemployment, and ruined public finances. After so many centuries of impoverishment, how did the Irish finally get rich, and how did they then fritter away so much so quickly? Veteran journalist David J. Lynch offers an insightful, character-driven narrative of how the Irish boom came to be and how it went bust. He opens our eyes to a nation's downfall through the lived experience of individual citizens: the people responsible for the current crisis as well as the ordinary men and women enduring it"--Provided by publisher.
catalogue key
7337290
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [223]-242) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"In this solid debut,USA Todayglobal affairs reporter Lynch tells the story of a small nation that has changed profoundly in recent decades...Incisive and well-reported."--Kirkus"When the luck of the Irish ran in, morality ran out. David Lynch's book is an amazing story of rampaging greed, dirty doings, even adulterous sex. Old Mother Ireland doffs her peasant's garb and emerges as a svelte, sexy, provocative siren infecting the willing Irish with diseased materialism. Holy Mother church affects a total hypocrite and politics is just another word for corruption. Along with a simple, concise history of Ireland Lynch even makes economics funny and fascinating. The artists of IrelandBono, Seamus Heaney, Roddy Dolye, Bill Whalen of Riverdanceemerge nobly from this cesspool."Malachy McCourt, author ofMalachy McCourt's History of IrelandandDanny Boy"A brilliant set of insights into the true and completely general nature of 'crony capitalism'. Close connections between politicians, bankers, and property developers brought Ireland great apparent prosperity while really creating the conditions for a huge and horrible crash. Lynch is optimistic that Ireland can rise again and find a more robust model for growth. Let's hope he is right."Simon Johnson, author of13 Bankers: The Wall Street Takeover and the Next Financial Meltdown"A tour de force of reportage and analysis. As much social anthropology as economic forensics, it is a cautionary tale of post-colonial success and excess. As cold as the eye he casts upon the land of his forebears is, Lynch retains an unmistakable affection for Ireland and a confidence that it can change, change utterly, for the better."--Kevin Cullen, columnist and former Dublin bureau chief of The Boston Globe"David Lynch has produced a terrific read a hair-raising gallop through the hills and valleys of modern day finance. After reading this book, you'll never think about Ireland or global financial markets -- in quite the same way."--David M. Smick, author ofThe World Is Curved: Hidden Dangers to the Global Economy"Lynch marvelously weaves together politics, history, and religion to explain the incredible economic and social transformation that has swept Ireland over the past three decades and the deep financial crisis that Ireland is grappling with today."Kenneth S. Rogoff, coauthor ofThis Time is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly"David Lynch's book will enrage, enlighten, and sadden you. His superbly written account of what really happened in Ireland during the boom of the Celtic Tiger and the ensuing bust is, to be sure, a story about Ireland. But it is a cautionary tale for all of us. The next time somebody tells you that the market can only go up, run away and re-read this book!"--Terry Golway, columnist forThe Irish Echoand history professor at Kean University
"In this solid debut, USA Today global affairs reporter Lynch tells the story of a small nation that has changed profoundly in recent decades...Incisive and well-reported."-- Kirkus "When the luck of the Irish ran in, morality ran out. David Lynch's book is an amazing story of rampaging greed, dirty doings, even adulterous sex. Old Mother Ireland doffs her peasant's garb and emerges as a svelte, sexy, provocative siren infecting the willing Irish with diseased materialism. Holy Mother church affects a total hypocrite and politics is just another word for corruption. Along with a simple, concise history of Ireland Lynch even makes economics funny and fascinating. The artists of IrelandBono, Seamus Heaney, Roddy Dolye, Bill Whalen of Riverdanceemerge nobly from this cesspool."Malachy McCourt, author of Malachy McCourt's History of Ireland and Danny Boy "A brilliant set of insights into the true and completely general nature of 'crony capitalism'. Close connections between politicians, bankers, and property developers brought Ireland great apparent prosperity while really creating the conditions for a huge and horrible crash. Lynch is optimistic that Ireland can rise again and find a more robust model for growth. Let's hope he is right."Simon Johnson, author of 13 Bankers: The Wall Street Takeover and the Next Financial Meltdown "A tour de force of reportage and analysis. As much social anthropology as economic forensics, it is a cautionary tale of post-colonial success and excess. As cold as the eye he casts upon the land of his forebears is, Lynch retains an unmistakable affection for Ireland and a confidence that it can change, change utterly, for the better."--Kevin Cullen, columnist and former Dublin bureau chief of The Boston Globe "David Lynch has produced a terrific read a hair-raising gallop through the hills and valleys of modern day finance. After reading this book, you'll never think about Ireland or global financial markets -- in quite the same way."--David M. Smick, author of The World Is Curved: Hidden Dangers to the Global Economy "Lynch marvelously weaves together politics, history, and religion to explain the incredible economic and social transformation that has swept Ireland over the past three decades and the deep financial crisis that Ireland is grappling with today."Kenneth S. Rogoff, coauthor of This Time is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly "David Lynch's book will enrage, enlighten, and sadden you. His superbly written account of what really happened in Ireland during the boom of the Celtic Tiger and the ensuing bust is, to be sure, a story about Ireland. But it is a cautionary tale for all of us. The next time somebody tells you that the market can only go up, run away and re-read this book!"--Terry Golway, columnist for The Irish Echo and history professor at Kean University
"In this solid debut, USA Today global affairs reporter Lynch tells the story of a small nation that has changed profoundly in recent decades...Incisive and well-reported."-- Kirkus "A sturdy and unsentimental tale of how Ireland reached its current predicament." The New Republic "When the luck of the Irish ran in, morality ran out. David Lynch's book is an amazing story of rampaging greed, dirty doings, even adulterous sex. Old Mother Ireland doffs her peasant's garb and emerges as a svelte, sexy, provocative siren infecting the willing Irish with diseased materialism. Holy Mother church affects a total hypocrite and politics is just another word for corruption. Along with a simple, concise history of Ireland Lynch even makes economics funny and fascinating. The artists of IrelandBono, Seamus Heaney, Roddy Dolye, Bill Whalen of Riverdanceemerge nobly from this cesspool."Malachy McCourt, author of Malachy McCourt's History of Ireland and Danny Boy "A brilliant set of insights into the true and completely general nature of 'crony capitalism'. Close connections between politicians, bankers, and property developers brought Ireland great apparent prosperity while really creating the conditions for a huge and horrible crash. Lynch is optimistic that Ireland can rise again and find a more robust model for growth. Let's hope he is right."Simon Johnson, author of 13 Bankers: The Wall Street Takeover and the Next Financial Meltdown "A tour de force of reportage and analysis. As much social anthropology as economic forensics, it is a cautionary tale of post-colonial success and excess. As cold as the eye he casts upon the land of his forebears is, Lynch retains an unmistakable affection for Ireland and a confidence that it can change, change utterly, for the better."--Kevin Cullen, columnist and former Dublin bureau chief of The Boston Globe "David Lynch has produced a terrific read a hair-raising gallop through the hills and valleys of modern day finance. After reading this book, you'll never think about Ireland or global financial markets -- in quite the same way."--David M. Smick, author of The World Is Curved: Hidden Dangers to the Global Economy "Lynch marvelously weaves together politics, history, and religion to explain the incredible economic and social transformation that has swept Ireland over the past three decades and the deep financial crisis that Ireland is grappling with today."Kenneth S. Rogoff, coauthor of This Time is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly "David Lynch's book will enrage, enlighten, and sadden you. His superbly written account of what really happened in Ireland during the boom of the Celtic Tiger and the ensuing bust is, to be sure, a story about Ireland. But it is a cautionary tale for all of us. The next time somebody tells you that the market can only go up, run away and re-read this book!"--Terry Golway, columnist for The Irish Echo and history professor at Kean University "Lynch's book is that rare thing, an economic study that's also a captivating snapshot of the society it's exploring. Written in lucid prose that will appeal to both the general reader and the economist, Lynch (a former Nieman fellow at Harvard University) understands that there's a lot more to a nation's story than the performance of its markets...he has appraised Ireland's particular strengths and weaknesses with a gimlet eye of an outsider who can see through all the palaver." Irish Central
"David Lynch's book is an amazing story of rampaging greed, dirty doings and even adulterous sex'¦Old Mother Ireland doffs her peasant's garb and emerges as a provocative siren, infecting the Irish with diseased materialism. Along with a concise history of Ireland, Lynch makes even economics funny and fascinating." - Malachy McCourt "A brilliant set of insights into the true and completely general nature of 'crony capitalism'. Close connections between politicians, bankers, and property developers brought Ireland great apparent prosperity ' while really creating the conditions for a huge and horrible crash. Lynch is optimistic that Ireland can rise again and find a more robust model for growth. Let's hope he is right." - Simon Johnson, Professor, MIT Sloan School of Management and author of 13 Bankers: The Wall Street Takeover and the Next Financial Meltdown "David Lynch's book will enrage, enlighten, and sadden you. His superbly written account of what really happened in Ireland during the boom of the Celtic Tiger and the ensuing bust is, to be sure, a story about Ireland. But it is also a cautionary tale for all of us. The next time somebody tells you that the market can only go up, run away and re-read this book!" - Terry Golway, columnist, The Irish Echo and author of So Others Might Live "Lynch marvelously weaves together politics, history, and religion to explain the incredible economic and social transformation that has swept Ireland over the past three decades and the deep financial crisis that Ireland is grappling with today." - Kenneth S. Rogoff, Professor of Economics, Harvard University and coauthor of This Time is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly "David Lynch has produced a terrific read ' a hair-raising gallop through the hills and valleys of modern day finance. After reading this book, you'll never think about Ireland ' or global financial markets - in quite the same way." - David M. Smick, author of The World Is Curved: Hidden Dangers to the Global Economy "A tour de force of reportage and analysis. As much social anthropology as economic forensics, it is a cautionary tale of post-colonial success and excess. As cold as the eye he casts upon the land of his forebears is, Lynch retains an unmistakable affection for Ireland and a confidence that it can change, change utterly, for the better." - Kevin Cullen, columnist and former Dublin bureau chief, The Boston Globe
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
The first exploration of modern Ireland's extraordinary journey from economic success story to a country in crisis
Long Description
Few countries have been as dramatically transformed in recent years as Ireland. Ireland finally emerged in the late 1990s as the fastest-growing country in Europe, with the typical Irishman enjoying a higher standard of living than the average Brit. Just a few years after celebrating their newly-won status among the world's richest societies, the Irish are now saddled with a wounded, shrinking economy, soaring unemployment, and ruined public finances. After so many centuries of impoverishment, how did the Irish finally get rich, and how did they then fritter away so much so quickly? Here, veteran journalist David J. Lynch offers an insightful, character-driven narrative of how the Irish boom came to be and how it went bust. He opens our eyes to a nation's downfall through the lived experience of individual citizens: the people responsible for the current crisis as well as the ordinary men and women enduring it.
Main Description
Few countries have been as dramatically transformed in recent years as Ireland. Once a culturally repressed land shadowed by terrorism and on the brink economic collapse, Ireland finally emerged in the late 1990s as the fastest-growing country in Europe, with the typical Irishman enjoying a higher standard of living than the average Brit. Just a few years after celebrating their newly-won status among the world's richest societies, the Irish are now saddled with a wounded, shrinking economy, soaring unemployment, and ruined public finances. After so many centuries of impoverishment, how did the Irish finally get rich, and how did they then fritter away so much so quickly? Here, veteran journalist David J. Lynch offers an insightful, character-driven narrative of how the Irish boom came to be and how it went bust. He opens our eyes to a nation's downfall through the lived experience of individual citizens: the people responsible for the current crisis as well as the ordinary men and women enduring it.
Main Description
Few countries have been as dramatically transformed in recent years as Ireland. Once a culturally repressed land shadowed by terrorism and on the brink of economic collapse, Ireland finally emerged in the late 1990s as the fastest-growing country in Europe, with the typical citizen enjoying a higher standard of living than the average Brit. Just a few years after celebrating their newly-won status among the world’s richest societies, the Irish are now saddled with a wounded, shrinking economy, soaring unemployment, and ruined public finances. After so many centuries of impoverishment, how did the Irish finally get rich, and how did they then fritter away so much so quickly? Veteran journalist David J. Lynch offers an insightful, character-driven narrative of how the Irish boom came to be and how it went bust. He opens our eyes to a nation’s downfall through the lived experience of individual citizens: the people responsible for the current crisis as well as the ordinary men and women enduring it.
Main Description
Few countries have been as dramatically transformed in recent years as Ireland. Once a culturally repressed land shadowed by terrorism and on the brink of economic collapse, Ireland finally emerged in the late 1990s as the fastest-growing country in Europe, with the typical citizen enjoying a higher standard of living than the average Brit. Just a few years after celebrating their newly-won status among the world's richest societies, the Irish are now saddled with a wounded, shrinking economy, soaring unemployment, and ruined public finances. After so many centuries of impoverishment, how did the Irish finally get rich, and how did they then fritter away so much so quickly? Veteran journalist David J. Lynch offers an insightful, character-driven narrative of how the Irish boom came to be and how it went bust. He opens our eyes to a nation's downfall through the lived experience of individual citizens: the people responsible for the current crisis as well as the ordinary men and women enduring it.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Once a culturally repressed land shadowed by terrorism and on the brink of economic collapse, Ireland finally emerged in the late 1990s as the fastest-growing country in Europe. Lynch offers a character-driven narrative of how the Irish boom came to be and how it went bust.
Table of Contents
Introduction: ôThe Boom Times Are Getting More Boomeröp. 1
Frugal Comfortp. 5
The Most Important Pub in Irelandp. 33
Liftoffp. 57
A Different Countryp. 81
Famine to Feastp. 103
Having It Allp. 127
People Lost the Run of Themselvesp. 151
Money Is Just Evidencep. 175
Epilogue: The Ireland that We Dreamed Ofp. 201
Acknowledgmentsp. 219
Notesp. 223
Bibliographyp. 241
Indexp. 243
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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