Catalogue

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Postcolonialism in the wake of the Nairobi revolution : Ngugi wa Thiong'o and the idea of African literature /
Apollo Obonyo Amoko.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
description
xi, 204 p.
ISBN
0230105467 (hbk.), 9780230105461 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
isbn
0230105467 (hbk.)
9780230105461 (hbk.)
contents note
Introduction: pitfalls of postcolonial intellectual consciousness: African literature in the wake of the Nairobi revolution -- Early fictions of school culture: The river between and Weep not, child -- Later fictions of school culture: Petals of blood and Devil on the cross -- Theaters of school culture: Festac, the Kenya national theater and the Kamiriithu theatre project, the trial of Dedan Kimathi, I will marry when I want and Kenneth Watene's Dedan Kimathi -- Conclusion: between irony and tragedy: Chiekh Hamidou Kane's ambiguous adventure in Ambiguous adventure.
catalogue key
7336308
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Apollo Obonyo Amoko is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Florida. His teaching and research interests are postcolonial theory and literatures (with specific emphasis on African literature), critical theory, cultural studies (race, gender, and sexuality studies), ethnic literatures of Canada and the United States, and modern drama. He has published essays in such journals as Modern Drama, Callaloo, Mosaic, and Research in African Literatures.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2011-05-01:
Examining the effects of colonialism on previously occupied countries has become the rage in the academy, in both the social sciences and the arts. Here Amoko (English, Univ. of Florida) joins the conversation, contending that the first printed African literature--fiction, poetry, drama--was created to voice nationalism, which accompanied the freedom process. The author considers the "Nairobi revolution"--a 1968 memo sent by three young African instructors in the University of Nairobi's expatriate-controlled English department to the dean of the arts faculty, asking that the English department be abolished--to be seminal in that process. The department was demolished and was replaced by an Afrocentric literature department and a revaluation of the teaching of African languages. One of the memo's senders was James Ngugi, now Ngugi Wa Thiong'o, a formidable literary voice and an exponent of the use of indigenous languages in creating new literature. An examination of Ngugi's literary pieces, both fiction and drama, takes up most of the book, as Amoko defines Ngugi's views of the colonial and postcolonial experience using his own words. Valuable if a bit controversial in some of its conclusions, this study should be welcomed by anyone interested in postcolonial theory or African studies. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. P. W. Stine retired, Gordon College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This study should be welcomed by anyone interested in postcolonial theory or African studies. Highly recommended." CHOICE
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 2011
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This work examines both the emergence of African literature & its institutionalization within nationalist African academies. Amoko analyzes the relationship between such institutions of literature & the processes of nationalist legitimization & between colonial & postcolonial school cultures & national cultures.
Description for Bookstore
This work examines both the emergence of African literature and its institutionalization within nationalist African academies
Main Description
This book examines the emergence of modern African literature both as a creative practice and an academic discipline.
Main Description
This book examines the emergence of modern African literature both as a creative practice and an academic discipline.
Main Description
This work examines both the emergence of African literature and its institutionalization within nationalist African academies. Amoko analyzes the relationship between such institutions of literature and the processes of nationalist legitimization and between colonial and postcolonial school cultures and national cultures. Of particular interest is Ngugi wa Thiong'o, a paradigmatic postcolonial intellectual who was instrumental in shaping both the African literary tradition and its place in the university. Amoko revises the critical consensus for a new age, suggesting that Ngugi's conflicted work belongs to an exclusionary school culture.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introduction: Pitfalls of Postcolonial Intellectual Consciousness: African Literature in the Wake of the Nairobi Revolutionp. 1
Early Fictions of School Culture: The River Between and Weep Not, Childp. 29
Later Fictions of School Culture: Petals of Blood and Devil on the Crossp. 67
The Theaters of School Culture: Imaging the Nation in Ngugi's Playsp. 109
Conclusion: Between Irony and Tragedy: Cheikh Hamidou Kane's Ambiguous Adventure in Ambiguous Adventurep. 159
Notesp. 179
Bibliographyp. 191
Indexp. 197
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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