Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

Doing the continental : a new Canadian-American relationship /
David Dyment ; foreword by Bob Rae.
imprint
Toronto : Dundurn Press, c2010.
description
171 p.
ISBN
1554887585, 9781554887583
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Toronto : Dundurn Press, c2010.
isbn
1554887585
9781554887583
catalogue key
7336081
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Issued also in electronic format.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
David Dyment teaches political science at the University of Ottawa and at Carleton University, where he is senior research associate in the Centre on North American Politics and Society. He has served on the staff of the governor general of Canada and was a senior policy adviser in the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade. As a media commentator, he has been heard on CTV, CBC Television and Radio, Radio-Canada (in French), and BBC. He received his doctorate from the Universit de Montral.
Reviews
Review Quotes
" Doing the Continentalis a timely look at our most important relationship, a foreign policy primer that examines our major touch points with the US: energy, water, Quebec, Afghanistan, Mexico and the Arctic." -- Gretta Bradley, M.A., iHigh School Curriculum Coordinator at Elmwood School, Ottawa
"Dr. Dyment deserves great credit, as a professed centre-left Canadian of a pretty conventional hue, for seeing that the United States is not an evil country foaming and heaving with covetousness for the pure snow maiden of the North."
"Dr. Dyment deserves great credit, as a professed centre-left Canadian of a pretty conventional hue,for seeing that the United States is not an evil country foaming and heaving with covetousness for the pure snow maiden of the North." - Literary Review of Canada, book review by Conrad Black, May issue, 2011
"Doing the Continentalis a timely look at our most important relationship, a foreign policy primer that examines our major touch points with the US: energy, water, Quebec, Afghanistan, Mexico and the Arctic." -- Gretta Bradley, M.A., iHigh School Curriculum Coordinator at Elmwood School, Ottawa
'œDoing the Continental is timely, well written and accessible to a broad audience. It covers the major issues in Canada-US relations today, and provides a valuable historical example/perspective. Most importantly, the book is pragmatic and realistic and is thus of value to policy makers, whereas most books that cover this subject tend toward the strident and ideological.' -- Eugene Lang, co-author of the best selling, award winning book The Unexpected War: Canada in Kandahar, Toronto: Viking, 2007.
"Doing the Continental is timely, well written and accessible to a broad audience. It covers the major issues in Canada-US relations today, and provides a valuable historical example/perspective. Most importantly, the book is pragmatic and realistic and is thus of value to policy makers, whereas most books that cover this subject tend toward the strident and ideological." -- Eugene Lang, co-author of the best selling, award winning book The Unexpected War: Canada in Kandahar, Toronto: Viking, 2007.
Doing the Continental is timely, well written and accessible to a broad audience. It covers the major issues in Canada-US relations today, and provides a valuable historical example/perspective. Most importantly, the book is pragmatic and realistic and is thus of value to policy makers, whereas most books that cover this subject tend toward the strident and ideological.” -- Eugene Lang, co-author of the best selling, award winning book The Unexpected War: Canada in Kandahar, Toronto: Viking, 2007.
" Doing the Continentalis very good, wise on all fronts. The chapter on our lack of an energy policy is very convincing." -- Lawrence Martin, columnist and former Washington bureau chief, with the Globe and Mail
"Doing the Continentalis very good, wise on all fronts. The chapter on our lack of an energy policy is very convincing." -- Lawrence Martin, columnist and former Washington bureau chief, with the Globe and Mail
"Doing the Continentalis very good, wise on all fronts. The chapter on our lack of an energy policy is very convincing." -- Lawrence Martin, columnist and former Washington bureau chief, with theGlobe and Mail
'œDyment's book provides a provocative assessment of where Canada goes from here in the development of its relationship with the United States. For Dyment, the new 'continental dance' should result in Canada being a more assertive and sophisticated partner ... His book will generate a much-needed debate on Canada's future policy priorities toward the superpower to its south.' -- Earl Fry Ph.D., Professor, David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies of Brigham Young University.
"Dyment's book provides a provocative assessment of where Canada goes from here in the development of its relationship with the United States. For Dyment, the new 'continental dance' should result in Canada being a more assertive and sophisticated partner ... His book will generate a much-needed debate on Canada's future policy priorities toward the superpower to its south." -- Earl Fry Ph.D., Professor, David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies of Brigham Young University.
"Dyment's book provides a provocative assessment of where Canada goes from here in the development of its relationship with the United States. For Dyment, the new "continental dance" should result in Canada being a more assertive and sophisticated partner ... His book will generate a much-needed debate on Canada's future policy priorities toward the superpower to its south." -- Earl Fry Ph.D., Professor, David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies of Brigham Young University.
Dyment’s book provides a provocative assessment of where Canada goes from here in the development of its relationship with the United States. For Dyment, the new ‘continental dance’ should result in Canada being a more assertive and sophisticated partner ... His book will generate a much-needed debate on Canada’s future policy priorities toward the superpower to its south.” -- Earl Fry Ph.D., Professor, David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies of Brigham Young University.
""Everyone has opinions about the state of Canada-US relations, but few have the knowledge to provide informed judgments. Professor Dyment happily falls into the latter category. While some of the prescriptions are controversial, this concise book has been carefully thought out and provides excellent grist for the Canadian policy mill. Doing the Continentalis a must read for those interested in Canadian-American relations." -- Michael Kergin, Canada's Ambassador to the United States from 2000-2005.
""Everyone has opinions about the state of Canada-US relations, but few have the knowledge to provide informed judgments. Professor Dyment happily falls into the latter category. While some of the prescriptions are controversial, this concise book has been carefully thought out and provides excellent grist for the Canadian policy mill. Doing the Continentalis a must read for those interested in Canadian-American relations."-- Michael Kergin, Canada's Ambassador to the United States from 2000-2005.
""Everyone has opinions about the state of Canada-US relations, but few have the knowledge to provide informed judgments. Professor Dyment happily falls into the latter category. While some of the prescriptions are controversial, this concise book has been carefully thought out and provides excellent grist for the Canadian policy mill.Doing the Continentalis a must read for those interested in Canadian-American relations." -- Michael Kergin, Canada's Ambassador to the United States from 2000-2005.
"In this refreshingly accessible book, David Dyment argues that Canadian discussions of Canada-US relations are so heavily dominated by extreme views that they frequently do more harm than good. His purpose, therefore, is to bring a more balanced perspective to bear. Some may disagree with his positions on specific issues, but much can be learned from the calm display of reason and sanity that he applies to a subject that so often generates more heat than light. His analysis deserves a very wide readership among those interested in Canadian politics and foreign policy." -- Denis Stairs, Ph.D. Professor Emeritus of Political Science, Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and former VP (Academic), Dalhousie Univeristy; former Rhodes Scholar; and past-president of the Canadian Political Science Association.
"In this refreshingly accessible book, David Dyment argues that Canadian discussions of Canada-US relations are so heavily dominated by extreme views that they frequently do more harm than good. His purpose, therefore, is to bring a more balanced perspective to bear. Some may disagree with his positions on specific issues, but much can be learned from the calm display of reason and sanity that he applies to a subject that so often generates more heat than light. His analysis deserves a very wide readership among those interested in Canadian politics and foreign policy."-- Denis Stairs, Ph.D. Professor Emeritus of Political Science, Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and former VP (Academic), Dalhousie Univeristy; former Rhodes Scholar; and past-president of the Canadian Political Science Association.
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Canada's relations with the US are broad & deep, & with Obama in the White House, the two countries have entered a new era of hope & renewal. From water & energy policy to defence, environmental strategy, & Arctic sovereignty, David Dyment provides an analysis of the past, present & future relations between the two countries.
Description for Reader
Advance Praise for Doing the Continental:'œEveryone has opinions about the state of Canada-U.S. relations, but few havethe knowledge to provide informed judgments. Professor Dyment happily fallsinto the latter category. While some of the prescriptions are controversial, thisconcise book has been carefully thought out and provides excellent grist for theCanadian policy mill. Doing the Continental is a must read for those interested inCanadian-American relations.''” Michael Kergin, Canada's Ambassador to the United States, 2000'2005When President Barack Obama sat at his desk for the first time in the Oval Office inJanuary 2009, one of the farthest things from his mind was Canada. On Capitol Hillthe whirling pursuit of interests was intense. In Ottawa, Canada's senior officialswere too preoccupied to appreciate that the nation's neighbours to the south weren'tpaying attention to the affairs and concerns of the Great White North.Canada's relations with the United States are broad and deep, and with Obamain the White House, the two countries are about to enter what could be a newera of hope and renewal. From water and energy policy to defence, environmentalstrategy, and Arctic sovereignty, David Dyment provides an astute, pithy analysis ofthe past, present, and future continental dance between two countries that havemuch in common, yet often step on each other's feet.
Description for Reader
Advance Praise for Doing the Continental:"Everyone has opinions about the state of Canada-U.S. relations, but few havethe knowledge to provide informed judgments. Professor Dyment happily fallsinto the latter category. While some of the prescriptions are controversial, thisconcise book has been carefully thought out and provides excellent grist for theCanadian policy mill. Doing the Continental is a must read for those interested inCanadian-American relations." Michael Kergin, Canada's Ambassador to the United States, 2000-2005When President Barack Obama sat at his desk for the first time in the Oval Office in January 2009, one of the farthest things from his mind was Canada. On Capitol Hillthe whirling pursuit of interests was intense. In Ottawa, Canada's senior officialswere too preoccupied to appreciate that the nation's neighbours to the south weren'tpaying attention to the affairs and concerns of the Great White North.Canada's relations with the United States are broad and deep, and with Obamain the White House, the two countries are about to enter what could be a newera of hope and renewal. From water and energy policy to defence, environmentalstrategy, and Arctic sovereignty, David Dyment provides an astute, pithy analysis ofthe past, present, and future continental dance between two countries that havemuch in common, yet often step on each other's feet.
Description for Reader
Advance Praise for Doing the Continental:Everyone has opinions about the state of Canada-U.S. relations, but few have the knowledge to provide informed judgments. Professor Dyment happily falls into the latter category. While some of the prescriptions are controversial, this concise book has been carefully thought out and provides excellent grist for the Canadian policy mill. Doing the Continental is a must read for those interested in Canadian-American relations.”— Michael Kergin, Canada’s Ambassador to the United States, 2000–2005When President Barack Obama sat at his desk for the first time in the Oval Office in January 2009, one of the farthest things from his mind was Canada. On Capitol Hill the whirling pursuit of interests was intense. In Ottawa, Canada’s senior officials were too preoccupied to appreciate that the nation’s neighbours to the south weren’t paying attention to the affairs and concerns of the Great White North.Canada’s relations with the United States are broad and deep, and with Obama in the White House, the two countries are about to enter what could be a new era of hope and renewal. From water and energy policy to defence, environmental strategy, and Arctic sovereignty, David Dyment provides an astute, pithy analysis of the past, present, and future continental dance between two countries that have much in common, yet often step on each other’s feet.
Description for Reader
When President Barack Obama sat at his desk for the first time in the Oval Office in January 2009, one of the farthest things from his mind was Canada. On Capitol Hill the whirling pursuit of interests was intense. In Ottawa, Canada's senior officials were too preoccupied to appreciate that the nation's neighbours to the south weren't paying attention to the affairs and concerns of the Great White North.Canada's relations with the United States are broad and deep, and with Obama in the White House, the two countries are about to enter what could be a new era of hope and renewal. From water and energy policy to defence, environmental strategy, and Arctic sovereignty, author David Dyment provides an astute, pithy analysis of the past, present, and future continental dance between two countries that have much in common yet often step on each other's feet.
Description for Reader
When President Barack Obama sat at his desk for the first time in the Oval Office in January 2009, one of the farthest things from his mind was Canada. On Capitol Hill the whirling pursuit of interests was intense. In Ottawa, Canada's senior officials were too preoccupied to appreciate that the nation's neighbours to the south weren't paying attention to the affairs and concerns of the Great White North. Canada's relations with the United States are broad and deep, and with Obama in the White House, the two countries are about to enter what could be a new era of hope and renewal. From water and energy policy to defence, environmental strategy, and Arctic sovereignty, David Dyment provides an astute, pithy analysis of the past, present, and future continental dance between two countries that have much in common, yet often step on each other's feet.
Description for Reader
When President Barack Obama sat at his desk for the first time in the Oval Office in January 2009, one of the farthest things from his mind was Canada. On Capitol Hill the whirling pursuit of interests was intense. In Ottawa, Canada's senior officials were too preoccupied to appreciate that the nation’s neighbours to the south weren’t paying attention to the affairs and concerns of the Great White North. Canada's relations with the United States are broad and deep, and with Obama in the White House, the two countries are about to enter what could be a new era of hope and renewal. From water and energy policy to defence, environmental strategy, and Arctic sovereignty, David Dyment provides an astute, pithy analysis of the past, present, and future continental dance between two countries that have much in common, yet often step on each other's feet.
Main Description
Advance Praise for Doing the Continental: "Everyone has opinions about the state of Canada-U.S. relations, but few have the knowledge to provide informed judgments. Professor Dyment happily falls into the latter category. While some of the prescriptions are controversial, this concise book has been carefully thought out and provides excellent grist for the Canadian policy mill. Doing the Continental is a must read for those interested in Canadian-American relations."- Michael Kergin, Canada's Ambassador to the United States, 2000-2005 When President Barack Obama sat at his desk for the first time in the Oval Office in January 2009, one of the farthest things from his mind was Canada. On Capitol Hill the whirling pursuit of interests was intense. In Ottawa, Canada's senior officials were too preoccupied to appreciate that the nation's neighbours to the south weren't paying attention to the affairs and concerns of the Great White North. Canada's relations with the United States are broad and deep, and with Obama in the White House, the two countries are about to enter what could be a new era of hope and renewal. From water and energy policy to defence, environmental strategy, and Arctic sovereignty, David Dyment provides an astute, pithy analysis of the past, present, and future continental dance between two countries that have much in common, yet often step on each other's feet.
Main Description
Advance Praise for Doing the Continental: "Everyone has opinions about the state of Canada-U.S. relations, but few have the knowledge to provide informed judgments. Professor Dyment happily falls into the latter category. While some of the prescriptions are controversial, this concise book has been carefully thought out and provides excellent grist for the Canadian policy mill. Doing the Continental is a must read for those interested in Canadian-American relations."-- Michael Kergin, Canada's Ambassador to the United States, 2000-2005 When President Barack Obama sat at his desk for the first time in the Oval Office in January 2009, one of the farthest things from his mind was Canada. On Capitol Hill the whirling pursuit of interests was intense. In Ottawa, Canada's senior officials were too preoccupied to appreciate that the nation's neighbours to the south weren't paying attention to the affairs and concerns of the Great White North. Canada's relations with the United States are broad and deep, and with Obama in the White House, the two countries are about to enter what could be a new era of hope and renewal. From water and energy policy to defence, environmental strategy, and Arctic sovereignty, David Dyment provides an astute, pithy analysis of the past, present, and future continental dance between two countries that have much in common, yet often step on each other's feet.
Main Description
When President Barack Obama sat at his desk for the first time in the Oval Office in January 2009, one of the farthest things from his mind was Canada. On Capitol Hill the whirling pursuit of interests was intense. In Ottawa, Canada's senior officials were too preoccupied to appreciate that the nation's neighbors to the south weren't paying attention to the affairs and concerns of the Great White North.Canada's relations with the United States are broad and deep, and with Obama in the White House, the two countries are about to enter what could be a new era of hope and renewal. From water and energy policy to defense, environmental strategy, and Arctic sovereignty, author David Dyment provides an astute, pithy analysis of the past, present, and future continental dance between two countries that have much in common yet often step on each other's feet.
Table of Contents
Forewordp. 9
Prefacep. 11
Introductionp. 13
Same Piece of Real Estate?p. 15
Avro Arrow: The World's Fastest Fighter Jet Runs Out of Fuelp. 19
Continental Dance: Managing the Relationshipp. 27
Basic Stepsp. 29
Engaging a Preoccupied Partnerp. 35
Our Segmented Neighbourp. 40
The Prime Minister and the Presidentp. 43
Canada is Not a Mouse!p. 47
Big Stepsp. 52
A Security and Prosperity Partnership?p. 52
Was Free Trade Free?p. 57
Rules for the Dancep. 63
Dance Venuesp. 69
What's Mexico Got to Do with It: Continental Counterweight or Deadweight?p. 71
An Energy Superpower Without an Energy Strategyp. 76
Not Watertightp. 87
Defrosting Arctic Sovereigntyp. 97
Manifest Destiny and Quebecp. 105
Conclusionp. 115
Beyond Our Shared Continent: Canada in the Worldp. 117
China Cardp. 120
Iraq, Ballistic Missile Defence, and Afghanistanp. 120
In the Groove: From Fear to Opportunityp. 123
Colonial Mentalityp. 126
Big Steps, No Thank Youp. 130
Two Essential Stepsp. 133
Final Refrainp. 135
Appendix: Twelve Steps for Doing the Continentalp. 137
Further Readingp. 139
Acknowledgementsp. 145
Notesp. 148
Indexp. 163
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem