Catalogue


Publishing as a vocation : studies of an old occupation in a new technological era /
Irving Louis Horowitz.
imprint
New Brunswick, N.J. : Transaction Publishers, c2011.
description
ix, 178 p.
ISBN
1412811104 (alk. paper), 9781412811101 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New Brunswick, N.J. : Transaction Publishers, c2011.
isbn
1412811104 (alk. paper)
9781412811101 (alk. paper)
contents note
Publishing challenges in the new century -- Technological rabbits and communication turtles -- Tripartite nature of university presses -- Limits of standardization in scholarship -- Publishing, property, and information structures -- Specialization in the electronic world -- Social science and scholarly communication -- Open access and closed minds -- Professional ambitions and public interests -- Formatting ideology through tabloid politics -- Scholarly pornography -- Publishing programs and political dilemmas -- Political periodicals in policy formation -- Monopolization of publishing and crisis in education -- Publishing responses to economic crisis -- Publishing as a vocation: the necessity of independence.
catalogue key
7335304
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Publishing as a Vocation is engrossing. While each was written sui generis, together they constitute a set of snapshots of the revolutionary communication situation we face today." -Howard Schneiderman, (Anthropology & Sociology) Lafayette College "Publishing as a Vocation is Olympian, but at the same time a down and dirty view on publishing. The last chapter with its case studies was a brilliant way to bring it all to closure." -Ray C. Rist, (Knowledge & Evaluation) The World Bank "Publishing as a Vocation is illuminating and thorough in its details. It presents publishing matters like a mathematical theory, with hypothesis, thesis and demonstration." -Lalo Schifrin, (Composer and Conductor) Beverly Hills, California. "Publishing as Vocation is most impressive in bridging with incisive analysis the ancient craft of publishing and the modern world of digital production. It is a marvelous job of combining moral exhortation and the discipline of economic reality." -James E. Katz, School of Communication and Information, Rutgers University "[A] lucid and penetrating analysis of what is happening in the publishing world, especially in the United States of course, but aslso-by ricochet-in Europe." -John Taylor, author of the series Paths to Contemporary French Literature "I Feel compelled to write you to remark upon, first the extraordinary value I believe this book offers those entering and neophytes in t he modern publishing world. In this period of such radical technological change and very possibly modifications of editorial standards and content the words of an old and successful hand can only be of immense use as they seek to make t heir way in a sea of uncertainty." -Richard Abel
"Publishing as a Vocation is engrossing. While each was written sui generis, together they constitute a set of snapshots of the revolutionary communication situation we face today." --Howard Schneiderman, (Anthropology & Sociology) Lafayette College "Publishing as a Vocation is Olympian, but at the same time a down and dirty view on publishing. The last chapter with its case studies was a brilliant way to bring it all to closure." --Ray C. Rist, (Knowledge & Evaluation) The World Bank "Publishing as a Vocation is illuminating and thorough in its details. It presents publishing matters like a mathematical theory, with hypothesis, thesis and demonstration." --Lalo Schifrin, (Composer and Conductor) Beverly Hills, California. "Publishing as Vocation is most impressive in bridging with incisive analysis the ancient craft of publishing and the modern world of digital production. It is a marvelous job of combining moral exhortation and the discipline of economic reality." --James E. Katz, School of Communication and Information, Rutgers University "[A] lucid and penetrating analysis of what is happening in the publishing world, especially in the United States of course, but aslso--by ricochet--in Europe." --John Taylor, author of the series Paths to Contemporary French Literature "I Feel compelled to write you to remark upon, first the extraordinary value I believe this book offers those entering and neophytes in t he modern publishing world. In this period of such radical technological change - and very possibly modifications of editorial standards and content - the words of an old and successful hand can only be of immense use as they seek to make t heir way in a sea of uncertainty." --Richard Abel
This item was reviewed in:
The Times (London), February 2011
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
The linkage of politics and technology is now the driving momentum in communication. Publishers are now part of the astonishing transformation of the slow to the instant. From twitters to bloggers, the communication of ideas can now be accomplished in a matter of minutes, not weeks, months, or even years. Horowitz believes that at its best, information technology can be harnessed to facilitate the expression of democratic thought. In providing better access to production and technology, there is great hope to liberate humankind from ignorance and ideology-and imagination is what the purpose of publishing is and always will be about. If politics is the art of the possible, then technology can be harnessed to the higher art of transforming scientific principles into everyday practices. Publishing as a Vocation places publishing in America in its political and commercial setting. It addresses the political implications of scholarly communication in the era of new computerized technology. Horowitz examines problems of political theory in the context of property rights versus the presumed right to know, and the special strains involved in publishing as commerce versus information as a public trust. Offering a knowledgeable and insightful view of publishing in America and abroad, this book makes an important contribution to the study of mass culture in advanced societies.Irving Louis Horowitz is Hannah Arendt distinguished university professor emeritus of sociology and political science at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. He is chairman of the board and editorial director of Transaction Publishers at the University. David Riesman called him "simply a national treasure." William Form, former editor of the American Sociological Review, has lauded him for "making a larger contribution to fundamental theory in social development and political sociology than any individual in the profession." Carl Gershman, president of the National Endowment for Democracy, noted "that the empire of truth and information that Transaction has built is a tremendous accomplishment." Th e founder of Th e Free Press, Jeremiah Kaplan, identifi ed Horowitz as "one of the most eminent social science publishers of our time.
Main Description
The linkage of politics and technology is now the driving momentum in communication. Publishers are now part of the astonishing transformation of the slow to the instant. From twitters to bloggers, the communication of ideas can now be accomplished in a matter of minutes, not weeks, months, or even years. Horowitz believes that at its best, information technology can be harnessed to facilitate the expression of democratic thought. In providing better access to production and technology, there is great hope to liberate humankind from ignorance and ideology-and imagination is what the purpose of publishing is and always will be about. If politics is the art of the possible, then technology can be harnessed to the higher art of transforming scientific principles into everyday practices. Publishing as a Vocation places publishing in America in its political and commercial setting. It addresses the political implications of scholarly communication in the era of new computerized technology. Horowitz examines problems of political theory in the context of property rights versus the presumed right to know, and the special strains involved in publishing as commerce versus information as a public trust. Offering a knowledgeable and insightful view of publishing in America and abroad, this book makes an important contribution to the study of mass culture in advanced societies.
Main Description
Publishing as a Vocation places publishing in its politicaland commercial setting. It addresses the political implications ofscholarly communication in an era of new computerized technology.Horowitz examines problems of political theory within the context ofproperty rights versus the presumed right to know and he explores thespecial strains involved in publishing as commerce versus informationas a public trust. This book offers a knowledgeable and insightful viewof publishing and makes an important contribution to the study ofmass culture in Western societies.
Main Description
The linkage of politics and technology is now the driving momentum in communication. Publishers are now part of the astonishing transformation of the slow to the instant. From twitters to bloggers, the communication of ideas can now be accomplished in a matter of minutes, not weeks, months, or even years. Horowit believes that at its best, information technology can be harnessed to facilitate the expression of democratic thought. In providing better access to production and technology, there is great hope to liberate humankind from ignorance and ideology-and imagination is what the purpose of publishing is and always will be about. If politics is the art of the possible, then technology can be harnessed to the higher art of transforming scientific principles into everyday practices. Publishing as a Vocation places publishing in America in its political and commercial setting. It addresses the political implications of scholarly communication in the era of new computeried technology. Horowit examines problems of political theory in the context of property rights versus the presumed right to know, and the special strains involved in publishing as commerce versus information as a public trust. Offering a knowledgeable and insightful view of publishing in America and abroad, this book makes an important contribution to the study of mass culture in advanced societies. Irving Louis Horowit is Hannah Arendt distinguished university professor emeritus of sociology and political science at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. He is chairman of the board and editorial director of Transaction Publishers at the University. David Riesman called him “simply a national treasure.” William Form, former editor of the American Sociological Review, has lauded him for “making a larger contribution to fundamental theory in social development and political sociology than any individual in the profession.” Carl Gershman, president of the National Endowment for Democracy, noted “that the empire of truth and information that Transaction has built is a tremendous accomplishment.” Th e founder of Th e Free Press, Jeremiah Kaplan, identifi ed Horowit as “one of the most eminent social science publishers of our time.
Long Description
Publishing as a Vocation places publishing in America in itspolitical and commercial setting. It addresses the politicalimplications of scholarly communication in the era of new computerizedtechnology. Horowitz examines problems of political theory in thecontext of property rights versus the presumed right to know, and thespecial strains involved in publishing as commerce versus informationas a public trust. Offering a knowledgeable and insightful view ofpublishing in America and abroad, this book makes an importantcontribution to the study of mass culture in advanced societies.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Introductionp. 1
Technology and Morality in Publishing
Publishing Challenges in the New Centuryp. 7
Technological Rabbits and Communication Turtlesp. 23
Tripartite Nature of University Pressesp. 37
Limits of Standardization in Scholarshipp. 47
Publishing, Property, and Information Structuresp. 55
Specialization in the Electronic Worldp. 65
Social Science and Scholarly Communicationp. 73
Open Access and Closed Mindsp. 81
The Political Economy of Publishing
Professional Ambitions and Public Interestsp. 91
Formatting Ideology through Tabloid Politicsp. 99
Scholarly Pornographyp. 115
Publishing Programs and Political Dilemmasp. 121
Political Periodicals in Policy Formationp. 131
Monopolization of Publishing and Crisis in Educationp. 143
Publishing Responses to Economic Crisisp. 149
Publishing as a Vocation: The Necessity of Independencep. 163
Indexp. 177
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem