Catalogue


Medicine and politics in colonial Peru : population growth and the Bourbon reforms /
Adam Warren.
imprint
Pittsburgh : University of Pittsburgh Press, c2010.
description
xi, 290 p.
ISBN
0822961113 (pbk. : alk. paper), 9780822961116 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Pittsburgh : University of Pittsburgh Press, c2010.
isbn
0822961113 (pbk. : alk. paper)
9780822961116 (pbk. : alk. paper)
contents note
Cultures of healing in colonial Lima, 1535-1780 -- Professionalizing healers and the Bourbon politics of reform, 1760-1810 -- Creole medical authority and peninsular vaccination campaigns, 1802-1810 -- Conquering the Biblical curse, 1804-1815 -- Burial reforms, piety, and popular protest, 1808-1850 -- Medical education and the end of medical reforms, 1808-1840.
catalogue key
7332402
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Adam Warren is assistant professor of history at the University of Washington.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2011-07-01:
Scholars of Latin American history have long found the Bourbon Reforms of the late colonial period an inexhaustible topic of study and analysis. Warren's recent work is the latest example of this line of research. Building upon earlier pioneering works on medical practices in the colonial world by the late John Tate Lanning and others, Warren (Univ. of Washington) delves into a host of provocative topics. For example, it may well be that the major thrust of reform was more profound in science and medicine than in politics in colonial Latin America. In the case of Peru, there emerged early, successful efforts at vaccinating the viceregal population against smallpox. Serious policy reforms emerged in training medical personnel, finding possible cures for leprosy, reversing the population shrinkage of the early centuries of Spanish rule, and mandating healthy burial practices. Perhaps the most intriguing of Warren's findings is that the political reforms resulting in independence terminated or stunted the medical reforms encouraged by the colonial bureaucracy. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. J. A. Lewis Western Carolina University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Adam Warren uses debates over vaccinations and disease in late colonial Peru to shed light not only on ideas about the body and death but also on classic topics such as the Bourbon Reforms and trans-Atlantic ideas in the age of the Enlightenment. Moving as it does from the microbe to the macro, Medicine and Politics in Colonial Peruclears new paths about medicine and colonialism and deserves a broad audience." -Charles F. Walker, Director, Hemispheric Institute on the Americas, University of California, Davis
"Adam Warren uses debates over vaccinations and disease in late colonial Peru to shed light not only on ideas about the body and death but also on classic topics such as the Bourbon Reforms and trans-Atlantic ideas in the age of the Enlightenment. Moving as it does from the microbe to the macro,Medicine and Politics in Colonial Peruclears new paths about medicine and colonialism and deserves a broad audience." -Charles F. Walker, Director, Hemispheric Institute on the Americas, University of California, Davis
“Adam Warren uses debates over vaccinations and disease in late colonial Peru to shed light not only on ideas about the body and death but also on classic topics such as the Bourbon Reforms and trans-Atlantic ideas in the age of the Enlightenment. Moving as it does from the microbe to the macro, Medicine and Politics in Colonial Peruclears new paths about medicine and colonialism and deserves a broad audience.” -Charles F. Walker, Director, Hemispheric Institute on the Americas, University of California, Davis
"A welcome study . . . rich in detail and a valuable addition to the field for its insight into the practice of medicine as an outworking of, and response to, the social and political realities of colonial Peru, engaging a broad academic readership with an interest in social and medical history." -Social History of Medicine
"A well-written and valuable study of public health and medical practice that will be read and discussed widely." -Journal of Latin American Studies
"The book's clearly written narratives and engaging detail make it a good choice for both undergraduate and graduate courses in colonial Latin America and the history of medicine." -Hispanic American Historical Review
"Warren delves into a host of provocative topics . . . Perhaps the most intriguing of Warren's findings is that the political reforms resulting in independence terminated or stunted the medical reforms encouraged by the colonial bureaucracy." -Choice
“Warren delves into a host of provocative topics . . . Perhaps the most intriguing of Warren’s findings is that the political reforms resulting in independence terminated or stunted the medical reforms encouraged by the colonial bureaucracy.” -Choice
"Adam Warrenprovides a fresh look at the Bourbon period through the history of medicine, healing, and health policy in colonial Peru, and its goal of growing the colony during the eighteenth and first half of the nineteenth century. It is one of the few works that examines the colonial origins of modern medical systems in Latin America." -Martha Few, University of Arizona
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 2011
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
By the end of the eighteenth century, Peru had witnessed the decline of its once-thriving silver industry, and it had barely begun to recover from massive population losses due to smallpox and other diseases. At the time, it was widely believed that economic salvation was contingent upon increasing the labor force and maintaining as many healthy workers as possible. In Medicine and Politics in Colonial Peru,Adam Warrenpresents a groundbreaking study of the primacy placed on medical care to generate population growth during this era. The Bourbon reforms of the eighteenth century shaped many of the political, economic, and social interests of Spain and its colonies. In Peru, local elites saw the reforms as an opportunity to positively transform society and its conceptions of medicine and medical institutions in the name of the Crown. Creole physicians in particular, took advantage of Bourbon reforms to wrest control of medical treatment away from the Catholic Church, establish their own medical expertise, and create a new, secular medical culture. They asserted their new influence by treating smallpox and leprosy, by reforming medical education, and by introducing hygienic routines into local funeral rites, among other practices. Later, during the early years of independence, government officials began to usurp the power of physicians and shifted control of medical care back to the church. Creole doctors, without the support of the empire, lost much of their influence, and medical reforms ground to a halt. As Warren’s study reveals, despite falling in and out of political favor, Bourbon reforms and creole physicians were instrumental to the founding of modern medicine in Peru, and their influence can still be felt today.
Main Description
By the end of the eighteenth century, Peru had witnessed the decline of its once-thriving silver industry, and it had barely begun to recover from massive population losses due to smallpox and other diseases. At the time, it was widely believed that economic salvation was contingent upon increasing the labor force and maintaining as many healthy workers as possible. In Medicine and Politics in Colonial Peru,Adam Warrenpresents a groundbreaking study of the primacy placed on medical care to generate population growth during this era. The Bourbon reforms of the eighteenth century shaped many of the political, economic, and social interests of Spain and its colonies. In Peru, local elites saw the reforms as an opportunity to positively transform society and its conceptions of medicine and medical institutions in the name of the Crown. Creole physicians in particular, took advantage of Bourbon reforms to wrest control of medical treatment away from the Catholic Church, establish their own medical expertise, and create a new, secular medical culture. They asserted their new influence by treating smallpox and leprosy, by reforming medical education, and by introducing hygienic routines into local funeral rites, among other practices. Later, during the early years of independence, government officials began to usurp the power of physicians and shifted control of medical care back to the church. Creole doctors, without the support of the empire, lost much of their influence, and medical reforms ground to a halt. As Warren's study reveals, despite falling in and out of political favor, Bourbon reforms and creole physicians were instrumental to the founding of modern medicine in Peru, and their influence can still be felt today.
Main Description
By the eighteenth century, Peru had witnessed the decline of its silver industry and massive population losses due to smallpox and other diseases. It was widely believed toward the century's end that economic salvation was contingent upon increasing the labor force and maintaining as many healthy workers as possible. In Medicine and Politics in Colonial Peru, Adam Warren presents a groundbreaking study of the primacy placed on medical care to generate population growth during this period.
Main Description
By the end of the eighteenth century, Peru had witnessed the decline of its once-thriving silver industry, and it had barely begun to recover from massive population losses due to smallpox and other diseases. At the time, it was widely believed that economic salvation was contingent upon increasing the labor force and maintaining as many healthy workers as possible. InMedicine and Politics in Colonial Peru,Adam Warrenpresents a groundbreaking study of the primacy placed on medical care to generate population growth during this era. The Bourbon reforms of the eighteenth century shaped many of the political, economic, and social interests of Spain and its colonies. In Peru, local elites saw the reforms as an opportunity to positively transform society and its conceptions of medicine and medical institutions in the name of the Crown. Creole physicians in particular, took advantage of Bourbon reforms to wrest control of medical treatment away from the Catholic Church, establish their own medical expertise, and create a new, secular medical culture. They asserted their new influence by treating smallpox and leprosy, by reforming medical education, and by introducing hygienic routines into local funeral rites, among other practices. Later, during the early years of independence, government officials began to usurp the power of physicians and shifted control of medical care back to the church. Creole doctors, without the support of the empire, lost much of their influence, and medical reforms ground to a halt. As Warrenrs"s study reveals, despite falling in and out of political favor, Bourbon reforms and creole physicians were instrumental to the founding of modern medicine in Peru, and their influence can still be felt today.
Bowker Data Service Summary
By the end of the 18th century, Peru had witnessed the decline of its once-thriving silver industry, and it had barely begun to recover from massive population losses due to smallpox and other diseases. Here, Warren presents a groundbreaking study of the primacy placed on medical care to generate population growth during this era.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
Cultures of Healing in Colonial Lima, 1535-1780p. 15
Professionalizing Healers and the Bourbon Politics of Reform, 1760-1810p. 49
Creole Medical Authority and Peninsular Vaccination Campaigns, 1802-1810p. 78
Conquering the Biblical Curse, 1804-1815p. 118
Burial Reforms, Piety, and Popular Protest, 1808-1850p. 157
Medical Education and the End of Medical Reforms, 1808-1840p. 192
Conclusionp. 218
Notesp. 233
Bibliographyp. 263
Indexp. 275
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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