Catalogue


The ruling class : management and politics in modern Italy /
edited by Tito Boeri, Antonio Merlo, and Andrea Prat ; with Giuliano Amato ... [et al.].
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2010.
description
xv, 211 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0199588287 (Cloth), 9780199588282 (Cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2010.
isbn
0199588287 (Cloth)
9780199588282 (Cloth)
general note
"The two studies that make up this volume were originally prepared for the tenth European conference of the Fondazione Rodolfo DeBenedetti, which was held in Gaeta in May 2008"--Acknowledgements.
catalogue key
7322288
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Long Description
The ruling class plays a major role in society. It makes possible what would otherwise be infeasible, by removing constraints that may stand in the way of long-term growth. Historically, economists devoted far less attention than sociologists to the study of ruling classes. Using the theoretical tools of economists, this volume provides an understanding of what drives the formation of a ruling class, and the relationship between politics and business firms. Focusing on Italy, ituses labour economics to analyse the selection of the ruling class, the labour market of politicians, the allocation of managers' time, and their incentives, remunerations, and career paths. It draws on contributions from two teams of leading scholars and on research undertaken by the Fondazione RodolfoDeBenedetti. Part I focuses on the labour market of politicians. It uses detailed information on personal characteristics, incomes, performance in office, and career paths (both before and after the Parliamentary mandate) of all the politicians elected to the Italian Lower Chamber (Camera) between 1948 and 2008. This is the first time that this information has been gathered and summarized in key indicators. Part II is devoted to the managerial class. It includes cross-country surveys of managers across asample of European countries, surveys carried out in cooperation with the largest union of managers in the service sector, social security records, and, for the first time, surveys on the allocation of time for top executives.
Main Description
The ruling class plays a major role in society. It makes possible what would otherwise be infeasible, by removing constraints that may stand in the way of long-term growth. Historically, economists devoted far less attention than sociologists to the study of ruling classes. Using thetheoretical tools of economists, this volume provides an understanding of what drives the formation of a ruling class, and the relationship between politics and business firms. Focusing on Italy, it uses labour economics to analyse the selection of the ruling class, the labour market of politicians,the allocation of managers' time, and their incentives, remunerations, and career paths. It draws on contributions from two teams of leading scholars and on research undertaken by the Fondazione Rodolfo DeBenedetti. Part I focuses on the labour market of politicians. It uses detailed information on personal characteristics, incomes, performance in office, and career paths (both before and after the Parliamentary mandate) of all the politicians elected to the Italian Lower Chamber (Camera) between 1948 and 2008.This is the first time that this information has been gathered and summarized in key indicators. Part II is devoted to the managerial class. It includes cross-country surveys of managers across a sample of European countries, surveys carried out in cooperation with the largest union of managers inthe service sector, social security records, and, for the first time, surveys on the allocation of time for top executives.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. x
List of Tablesp. xiii
List of Contributorsp. xv
Introductionp. 1
The Labour Market of Italian Politicians
Introductionp. 9
Institutional Backgroundp. 14
The Italian Parliamentp. 14
The electoral lawp. 17
A tale of two Republicsp. 22
The political parties of the First Republicp. 23
The political parties of the Second Republicp. 28
The role of trade unionsp. 35
Stylized Factsp. 38
Career profilesp. 38
Incomesp. 49
Outcomesp. 60
Partiesp. 63
Analysis and Conclusionsp. 74
Private returns to legislative experience and the quality of politiciansp. 74
Some closing remarks on the Italian electoral lawp. 87
Appendixp. 91
Referencesp. 93
Commentsp. 96
Italian Managers: Fidelity or Performance?
Introductionp. 107
Overviewp. 111
Incentives, management practices, and family firmsp. 111
Incentivesp. 111
Management practicesp. 113
Family firmsp. 115
CEOs' characteristics and activityp. 116
Data Sourcesp. 118
Survey of ManagerItalia membersp. 118
CEOs' time-use surveyp. 120
INPS databasep. 121
CEP Management Surveyp. 122
Managers' Characteristicsp. 125
Demographicsp. 125
Agep. 125
Genderp. 129
National originp. 130
Managers' backgroundp. 132
Educationp. 132
Family and originp. 134
Attitude towards riskp. 138
Firms' Managerial Policiesp. 139
International comparisonp. 139
Analysing people management with the ManagerItalia surveyp. 141
Recruitmentp. 141
Appraisalsp. 142
Bonusesp. 146
Promotions and dismissalsp. 147
The evolution of the incentive structure: evidence from INPSp. 154
Fidelity versus Performancep. 160
Selectionp. 162
Effortp. 162
Use of timep. 167
Data descriptionp. 167
Do CEOs of different age cohorts use their time differently?p. 173
Do CEOs who work longer hours use their time differently?p. 174
What firm characteristics explain time use?p. 177
Compensation and job satisfactionp. 181
Managerial policies and firm performancep. 184
Conclusionsp. 191
Referencesp. 194
Commentsp. 197
Indexp. 203
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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