Catalogue


Liberal intellectuals and public culture in modern Britain, 1815-1914 : making words flesh /
William C. Lubenow.
imprint
Woodbridge : Boydell, c2010.
description
viii, 252 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1843835592 (hbk.), 9781843835592 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Woodbridge : Boydell, c2010.
isbn
1843835592 (hbk.)
9781843835592 (hbk.)
catalogue key
7319759
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 223-245) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
William C. Lubenow is Professor of History at Stockton College, New Jersey. He is the author of The Politics of Government Growth, Parliamentary Politics and the Home Rule Crisis, and The Cambridge Apostles, 1820-1914.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2011-04-01:
Public life in Great Britain underwent a major transformation after the repeal of the Test and Corporation Acts in 1828 and the passage of the Catholic Relief Act of 1829, which eliminated the requirement that men in public positions swear to uphold the doctrines of the Anglican Church. According to Lubenow (Stockton College), these legislative changes initiated a fundamental reallocation of power, opening many careers to men of talent and educational qualifications, including those whose perspectives and intellectual dispositions led them to question the validity of uniform religious dogma. Lubenow identifies members of the Benson, Strachey, Balfour, Lyttelton, and Sitwell families among the "Men of Letters" who epitomized the 19th century's new secular meritocracy, noting that when religious uniformity was removed as a requirement for positions in the public sphere, religion became more important, if more fluid, in the lives of such Britons. Thus, men of intellectual merit, rather than only those from the more conservative landowning or military traditions, were able to rise in politics, civil service, the clergy, the professions, and the universities, taking their liberal values regarding liberty, moral cultivation, and philosophy into the wider public sphere. Summing Up; Recommended. Graduate students, faculty. E. J. Jenkins Arkansas Tech University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, April 2011
Reference & Research Book News, December 2011
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This is a study of 19th-century liberalism, understood as a process rather than a philosophy, policy or ideology. It shows how liberal values reconstructed public space in Britain after the repeal of the Test and Corporations Acts (1828) and the passage of Catholic emancipation (1829).
Main Description
Liberal Intellectuals and Public Culture in Modern Britain shows how liberal values reconstructed public space in Britain after the repeal of the Test and Corporations Acts(1828) and the passage of Catholic emancipation (1829).
Main Description
Liberal Intellectuals and Public Culture in Modern Britain shows how liberal values reconstructed public space in Britain after the repeal of the Test and Corporations Acts (1828) and the passage of Catholic emancipation (1829). It traces the century-long process against subscription to the Thirty-Nine Articles. It examines the emergence of the intellectual authority of the universities and the social authority of the professions. It shows how these changes gave different political and social opportunities for new families such as the Bensons, the Venns, the Stracheys and the Trevelyans. When the social moorings of the confessional state diminished new forms of association emerged to devise and promote liberal values as a distinctive form of cultural capital. This cultural capital - antique and modern letters, mathematics - filled the public sphere and provided the materials for intellectual change. The final chapters on Roman Catholicism and nationalism reveal the fragilities of this public culture. WILLIAM C. LUBENOW is Professor of History at Stockton College, New Jersey. He is the author of The Politics of Government Growth, Parliamentary Politics and the Home Rule Crisis, and the Cambridge Apostles, 1820-1914.
Unpaid Annotation
This book is a study of nineteenth-century liberalism, understood as a process rather than a philosophy, policy or ideology.
Unpaid Annotation
This book is a study of liberalism, understood as a process rather than a philosophy, policy or ideology.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. vii
Abbreviationsp. viii
Introductionp. 1
From Confessional Values to Liberal Valuesp. 9
The Fashioning of Liberal Values in the Universities and the Professionsp. 29
A Different Regime of Social Worthp. 57
Making Cultural Capital: Clubs, Societies, and New Forms of Binding Tiesp. 91
Cultural Capital: From Literalism to the Edge of Certaintyp. 127
Limitations: Roman Catholicismp. 155
Limitations: Nationalismp. 185
Conclusionp. 217
Bibliographyp. 223
Indexp. 247
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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