Catalogue


Swift and Pope : satirists in dialogue /
Dustin Griffin.
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2010.
description
xiv, 260 p. : ill.
ISBN
9780521761239 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2010.
isbn
9780521761239 (hardback)
contents note
Introduction: Conversing interchangeably -- The four last years of Queen Anne -- "Drive the world before them" -- Satyrist and philosopher -- In the manner of Dr Swift -- Last things.
abstract
"Swift and Pope were lifelong friends and fellow satirists with shared literary sensibilities. But there were significant differences - demographic, psychological, and literary - between them: an Anglican and a Roman Catholic, an Irishman and an Englishman, one deeply committed to politically engaged poetry, and the other reluctant to engage in partisanship and inclined to distinguish poetry from politics. Dustin Griffin argues that we need to pay more attention to those differences, which both authors recognised and discussed. Their letters, poems, and satires can be read as stages in an ongoing conversation or satiric dialogue: each often wrote for the other, sometimes addressing him directly, sometimes emulating or imitating. In some sense, each was constantly replying to the other. From their lifelong dialogue emerges not only the extraordinary affection and admiration they felt for each other, but also the occasional irritation and resentment that kept them both together and apart"--
catalogue key
7318481
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2011-09-01:
Griffin (emer., NYU) offers five lengthy essays, each focusing on a particular period of dialogue between Jonathan Swift (1667-1745) and Alexander Pope (1688-1744), starting in 1710 ("The Four Last Years of Queen Anne") and continuing until Pope's death. The book as a whole examines the effect that this lifelong dialogue had on each satirist. Whereas earlier studies explored either the writers' shared sensibility or their divergences, Griffin looks at how, as "satirists in dialogue" with one another, they defined their self-perception, and he argues that "to read them in isolation is in part to misread them." He explores crucial areas of conversation and correspondence along with obvious poems-as-response and collaborative authorship and editorship; he also makes brief forays into other subjects, for example, book history. Griffin draws loosely on theories of dialogic writing without much explicit theorizing. He also mentions various critical consensuses and trends, but though he does this with general accuracy he does not substantiate and document these claims in footnotes or bibliography--a significant weakness of the book. Nevertheless, by exploring the tendency of 18th-century texts to have multiple, even anonymous authors and to inhabit explicitly responsive contexts, Griffin offers crucial pre-Romantic contexts for both authors. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. C. S. Vilmar Salisbury University
Reviews
Review Quotes
'Griffin's [Swift and Pope] is a rewarding read; a detailed and often moving portrait of one of the great literary friendships.' Louise Curran, English Studies
'... one of the most useful and lucid critical monographs I have encountered in the last half-decade ...' Eighteenth-Century Studies
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 2011
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Dustin Griffin explores the lifelong conversation between two great 18th-century English writers. Reading the writings of Swift and Pope in tandem, he clarifies what drew together these two famed satirists, and also uncovers an under-recognized current of irritation and resentment in their relationship.
Description for Bookstore
Dustin Griffin explores the lifelong conversation between two great eighteenth-century English writers. Reading the writings of Swift and Pope in tandem, he clarifies what drew together these two famed satirists, and also uncovers an under-recognized current of irritation and resentment in their relationship.
Description for Bookstore
In this 2010 book, Dustin Griffin explores the lifelong conversation between two great eighteenth-century English writers. Reading the writings of Swift and Pope in tandem, he clarifies what drew together these two famed satirists, and also uncovers an under-recognized current of irritation and resentment in their relationship.
Description for Bookstore
In this book, Dustin Griffin explores the lifelong conversation between two great eighteenth-century English writers. Reading the writings of Swift and Pope in tandem, he clarifies what drew together these two famed satirists, and also uncovers an under-recognized current of irritation and resentment in their relationship.
Main Description
Swift and Pope were lifelong friends and fellow satirists with shared literary sensibilities. But there were significant differences - demographic, psychological, and literary - between them: an Anglican and a Roman Catholic, an Irishman and an Englishman, one deeply committed to politically engaged poetry, and the other reluctant to engage in partisanship and inclined to distinguish poetry from politics. Dustin Griffin argues that we need to pay more attention to those differences, which both authors recognised and discussed. Their letters, poems, and satires can be read as stages in an ongoing conversation or satiric dialogue: each often wrote for the other, sometimes addressing him directly, sometimes emulating or imitating. In some sense, each was constantly replying to the other. From their lifelong dialogue emerges not only the extraordinary affection and admiration they felt for each other, but also the occasional irritation and resentment that kept them both together and apart.
Main Description
Swift and Pope were lifelong friends and fellow satirists with shared literary sensibilities. But there were significant differences - demographic, psychological, and literary - between them: an Anglican and a Roman Catholic, an Irishman and an Englishman, one deeply committed to politically engaged poetry, and the other reluctant to engage in partisanship and inclined to distinguish poetry from politics. In this 2010 book, Dustin Griffin argues that we need to pay more attention to those differences, which both authors recognised and discussed. Their letters, poems, and satires can be read as stages in an ongoing conversation or satiric dialogue: each often wrote for the other, sometimes addressing him directly, sometimes emulating or imitating. In some sense, each was constantly replying to the other. From their lifelong dialogue emerges not only the extraordinary affection and admiration they felt for each other, but also the occasional irritation and resentment that kept them both together and apart.
Table of Contents
A SwiftâÇôPope chronology
Introduction: conversing interchangeably
The four last years of Queen Anne
Drive the world before them
Satyrist and philosopher
In the manner of Dr Swift
Last things
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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