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The English republican tradition and eighteenth-century France : between the ancients and the moderns /
Rachel Hammersley.
imprint
Manchester ; New York : Manchester University Press ; New York : Distributed exclusively in the USA by Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
description
xi, 239 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0719079322 (hbk.), 9780719079320 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Manchester ; New York : Manchester University Press ; New York : Distributed exclusively in the USA by Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
isbn
0719079322 (hbk.)
9780719079320 (hbk.)
catalogue key
7313021
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [208]-229) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2011-06-01:
Hammersley (Newcastle Univ., UK) argues that historians have ignored a vital third strand in tracing the history of republican ideas in Revolutionary France. To the traditional ancient (classical) and modern (American Revolution) sources she has added a third: English Civil War writings, 1640-60, and their elaboration by 18th-century commonwealth men. First Huguenot writers and then a mixture of authors with Anglo-French connections such as Viscount Bolingbroke, John Wilkes, Chevalier d'Eon, Abbe de Mably, and Baron d'Holbach translated, discussed, and adapted these ideas. As a result, French revolutionaries such as Jean-Paul Marat, the marquis de Mirabeau, Camille Desmoulins, and figures in the Cordeliers Club were knowledgeable and drew parallels from the English revolutionary experience (Maximilien Robespierre is conspicuously absent). The author deftly teases out key republican ideas in a particularly clear and readable style. Abundantly documented, her work draws on collections throughout the UK, Netherlands, and even the US; curiously, no French manuscript collections are cited. Overall, Hammersley presents a convincing case that the English revolutionary experience played a significant role in the evolution of French republican ideas, and that historians need to study such cross-national transmission. Summing Up: Recommended. Academic libraries, graduate level and above. D. C. Baxter emeritus, Ohio University
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Choice, June 2011
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text offers an account of the role played by 17th- and 18th-century English Republican ideas in 18th-century France. Challenging some of the dominant accounts of the Republican tradition, it revises conventional understandings of what Republicanism meant in both Britain and France during the 18th century.
Main Description
*The English Republican Tradition and Eighteenth-Century France* offers the first full account of the role played by seventeenth and eighteenth-century English republican ideas in eighteenth-century France, and examines their impact on the development of French republicanism.Challenging some of the dominant accounts of the republican tradition, it revises conventional understandings of what republicanism meant in both Britain and France during the eighteenth-century, offering a distinctive trajectory as regards ancient and modern constructions and highlighting variety rather than homogeneity within the tradition. Hammersley thus offers a new and fascinating perspective on both the legacy of the English republican tradition and the origins and thought of the French Revolution. The book is focused around a series of case studies, which highlight key moments in the incorporation of English republican ideas into a French context. These case studies focus on a number of colourful and influential characters including John Toland, viscount Bolingbroke, John Wilkes, the chevalier d’Eon, the baron d’Holbach, Jean-Paul Marat and the comte de Mirabeau. Close readings of key texts are set against the historical and intellectual background so as to demonstrate the interrelationship between theory and practice, and the ways in which the ideas were adapted and developed over time. This book will thus be of value to all those interested in the fields of intellectual history and the history of political thought, seventeenth and eighteenth-century British history, eighteenth-century French history and French Revolution studies.
Main Description
*The English Republican Tradition and Eighteenth-Century France* offers the first full account of the role played by seventeenth and eighteenth-century English republican ideas in eighteenth-century France. Challenging some of the dominant accounts of the republican tradition, it revises conventional understandings of what republicanism meant in both Britain and France during the eighteenth-century, offering a distinctive trajectory as regards ancient and modern constructions and highlighting variety rather than homogeneity within the tradition. Hammersley thus offers a new and fascinating perspective on both the legacy of the English republican tradition and the origins and thought of the French Revolution. The book is focused around a series of case studies, which focus on a number of colourful and influential characters including John Toland, viscount Bolingbroke, John Wilkes, and the comte de Mirabeau. This book will thus be of value to all those interested in the fields of intellectual history and the history of political thought, seventeenth and eighteenth-century British history, eighteenth-century French history and French Revolution studies.
Main Description
*The English Republican Tradition and Eighteenth-Century France* offers the first full account of the role played by seventeenth and eighteenth-century English republican ideas in eighteenth-century France.Challenging some of the dominant accounts of the republican tradition, it revises conventional understandings of what republicanism meant in both Britain and France during the eighteenth-century, offering a distinctive trajectory as regards ancient and modern constructions and highlighting variety rather than homogeneity within the tradition. Hammersley thus offers a new and fascinating perspective on both the legacy of the English republican tradition and the origins and thought of the French Revolution. The book is focused around a series of case studies, which focus on a number of colourful and influential characters including John Toland, viscount Bolingbroke, John Wilkes, and the comte de Mirabeau. This book will thus be of value to all those interested in the fields of intellectual history and the history of political thought, seventeenth and eighteenth-century British history, eighteenth-century French history and French Revolution studies.
Main Description
The English Republican Tradition and Eighteenth-Century France offers the first full account of the role played by seventeenth and eighteenth-century English republican ideas in eighteenth-century France. Challenging some of the dominant accounts of the republican tradition, it revises conventional understandings of what republicanism meant in both Britain and France during the eighteenth-century, offering a distinctive trajectory as regards ancient and modern constructions and highlighting variety rather than homogeneity within the tradition. Hammersley thus offers a new and fascinating perspective on both the legacy of the English republican tradition and the origins and thought of the French Revolution. The book is focused around a series of case studies, which focus on a number of colourful and influential characters including John Toland, viscount Bolingbroke, John Wilkes, and the comte de Mirabeau. This book will thus be of value to all those interested in the fields of intellectual history and the history of political thought, seventeenth and eighteenth--entury British history, eighteenth-century French history and French Revolution studies.
Main Description
The English Republican Tradition and Eighteenth-Century Franceoffers the first full account of the role played by seventeenth and eighteenth-century English republican ideas in eighteenth-century France. Challenging some of the dominant accounts of the republican tradition, it revises conventional understandings of what republicanism meant in both Britain and France during the eighteenth-century, offering a distinctive trajectory as regards ancient and modern constructions and highlighting variety rather than homogeneity within the tradition. Hammersley thus offers a new and fascinating perspective on both the legacy of the English republican tradition and the origins and thought of the French Revolution. The book is focused around a series of case studies, which focus on a number of colourful and influential characters including John Toland, viscount Bolingbroke, John Wilkes, and the comte de Mirabeau. This book will thus be of value to all those interested in the fields of intellectual history and the history of political thought, seventeenth and eighteenth--entury British history, eighteenth-century French history and French Revolution studies.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
List of abbreviations
Introduction
Real Whigs and Huguenots
Bolingbroke and France
Commonwealthmen, Wilkites and France
English republicans and the French Revolution
Conclusion
Appendix: French translations of English republican works
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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