Catalogue


Wives and husbands : gender and age in Southern Arapaho history /
Loretta Fowler.
imprint
Norman [Okla.] : University of Oklahoma Press, c2010.
description
xii, 382 p. : ill., maps, ports. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0806141166 (hardcover : alk. paper), 9780806141169 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Norman [Okla.] : University of Oklahoma Press, c2010.
isbn
0806141166 (hardcover : alk. paper)
9780806141169 (hardcover : alk. paper)
contents note
Rules of life : gender and age before the reservation, 1805-1869 -- Seeing signs and wonders : cohorts, civilization, and new religions, 1870-1901 -- Like a reed : coping with a cash economy, 1902-1936 -- Conclusion : Making gender, making history.
catalogue key
7310569
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 353-364) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2011-07-01:
This unique, engaging work explores gender relations and social structures from the early-19th through the mid-20th centuries using cohort analysis. Emerita anthropologist Fowler (Oklahoma) identifies five cohorts spanning over 100 years. Through archival, primary, and secondary sources, she reconstructs the ways in which Arapaho life changed as a result of colonialism, allotment, boarding schools, the introduction of a cash economy, and changing political structures. In each cohort, the author explores the intersecting roles of children, men, women, and elders, creating a rich sense of how the community works as a whole. At the same time, the use of cohort analysis builds not just a historical portrait of Arapaho life, but also a personal one. Readers are able to clearly see how generations of the same families reacted to, adapted to, and influenced colonial encounters. The men and women in each cohort come across as individuals, rather than as merely historical actors in the drama of American colonization. The writing is engaging and highly readable in this extraordinary look at "how gender systems are affected by and affect colonial encounters.. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. J. B. Edwards University of Montana
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 2011
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Summaries
Main Description
Offers new insight into how Arapaho gender roles changed over time In Wives and Husbands , distinguished anthropologist Loretta Fowler deepens readers' understanding of the gendered dimension of cultural encounters by exploring how the Arapaho gender system affected and was affected by the encounter with Americans as government officials, troops, missionaries, and settlers moved west into Arapaho country. Fowler examines Arapaho history from 1805 to 1936 through the lens of five cohorts, groups of women and men born during different year spans. Through the life stories of individual Arapahos, she vividly illustrates the experiences and actions of each cohort during a time when Americans tried to impose gender asymmetry and to undermine the Arapahos' hierarchical age relations. Fowler examines the Arapaho gender system and its transformations by considering the partnerships between, rather than focusing on comparisons of, women and men. She argues that in particular cohorts, partnerships between women and men -- both in households and in the community -- shaped Arapahos' social and cultural transformations while they struggled with American domination. Over time Arapahos both reinforced and challenged Arapaho hierarchies while accommodating and resisting American dominance. Fowler shows how, in the process of reconfiguring their world, Arapahos confronted Americans by uniting behind strategies of conciliation in the early nineteenth century, of civilization in the late nineteenth century, and of confrontation in the early twentieth century. At the same time, women and men in particular cohorts were revamping Arapaho politico-religious ideas and organizations. Gender played a part in these transformations, giving shape to new leadership traditions and other adaptations.
Main Description
In Wives and Husbands , distinguished anthropologist Loretta Fowler deepens readers’ understanding of the gendered dimension of cultural encounters by exploring how the Arapaho gender system affected and was affected by the encounter with Americans as government officials, troops, missionaries, and settlers moved west into Arapaho country. Fowler examines Arapaho history from 1805 to 1936 through the lens of five cohorts, groups of women and men born during different year spans. Through the life stories of individual Arapahos, she vividly illustrates the experiences and actions of each cohort during a time when Americans tried to impose gender asymmetry and to undermine the Arapahos’ hierarchical age relations. Fowler examines the Arapaho gender system and its transformations by considering the partnerships between, rather than focusing on comparisons of, women and men. She argues that in particular cohorts, partnerships between women and men - both in households and in the community - shaped Arapahos’ social and cultural transformations while they struggled with American domination. Over time Arapahos both reinforced and challenged Arapaho hierarchies while accommodating and resisting American dominance. Fowler shows how, in the process of reconfiguring their world, Arapahos confronted Americans by uniting behind strategies of conciliation in the early nineteenth century, of civilization in the late nineteenth century, and of confrontation in the early twentieth century. At the same time, women and men in particular cohorts were revamping Arapaho politico-religious ideas and organizations. Gender played a part in these transformations, giving shape to new leadership traditions and other adaptations.
Main Description
In Wives and Husbands , distinguished anthropologist Loretta Fowler deepens readers' understanding of the gendered dimension of cultural encounters by exploring how the Arapaho gender system affected and was affected by the encounter with Americans as government officials, troops, missionaries, and settlers moved west into Arapaho country. Fowler examines Arapaho history from 1805 to 1936 through the lens of five cohorts, groups of women and men born during different year spans. Through the life stories of individual Arapahos, she vividly illustrates the experiences and actions of each cohort during a time when Americans tried to impose gender asymmetry and to undermine the Arapahos' hierarchical age relations. Fowler examines the Arapaho gender system and its transformations by considering the partnerships between, rather than focusing on comparisons of, women and men. She argues that in particular cohorts, partnerships between women and men - both in households and in the community - shaped Arapahos' social and cultural transformations while they struggled with American domination. Over time Arapahos both reinforced and challenged Arapaho hierarchies while accommodating and resisting American dominance. Fowler shows how, in the process of reconfiguring their world, Arapahos confronted Americans by uniting behind strategies of conciliation in the early nineteenth century, of civilization in the late nineteenth century, and of confrontation in the early twentieth century. At the same time, women and men in particular cohorts were revamping Arapaho politico-religious ideas and organizations. Gender played a part in these transformations, giving shape to new leadership traditions and other adaptations.
Main Description
In Wives and Husbands, distinguished anthropologist Loretta Fowler deepens readers' understanding of the gendered dimension of cultural encounters by exploring how the Arapaho gender system affected and was affected by the encounter with Americans as government officials, troops, missionaries, and settlers moved west into Arapaho country. Fowler examines Arapaho history from 1805 to 1936 through the lens of five cohorts, groups of women and men born during different year spans. Through the life stories of individual Arapahos, she vividly illustrates the experiences and actions of each cohort during a time when Americans tried to impose gender asymmetry and to undermine the Arapahos' hierarchical age relations.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introductionp. 3
Rules of Life: Gender and Age before the Reservation, 1805-1869p. 13
Seeing Signs and Wonders: Cohorts, Civilization, and New Religions, 1870-1901p. 111
Like a Reed: Coping with a Cash Economy, 1902-1936p. 197
Conclusion: Making Gender, Making Historyp. 287
Abbreviationsp. 313
Notesp. 317
Bibliographyp. 353
Indexp. 365
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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