Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

Common sense /
Thomas Paine ; introduction by Alan Taylor.
imprint
Cambridge, MA : Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2010.
description
xxix, 68 p. ; 21 cm.
ISBN
0674051165 (pbk.), 9780674051164 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
Cambridge, MA : Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2010.
isbn
0674051165 (pbk.)
9780674051164 (pbk.)
catalogue key
7306843
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 67-68).
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2005-10-01:
Penguin strikes again with a wonderful new series called "Great Ideas" featuring 12 books by great thinkers dating back to the first millennium B.C.E. through the mid-20th century, covering art, politics, literature, philosophy, science, history, and more. Each slim paperback is individually designed, and all are affordable at $8.95. A great idea indeed. Snap 'em up! (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Summaries
Main Description
"In Common Sense a writer found his moment to change the world," Alan Taylor writes in his introduction. When Paine's attack on the British mixed constitution of kings, lords, and commons was published in January 1776, fighting had already erupted between British troops and American Patriots, but many Patriots still balked at seeking independence. "By discrediting the sovereign king," Taylor argues, "Paine made independence thinkable-as he relocated sovereignty from a royal family to the collective people of a republic." Paine's American readers could conclude that they stood at "the center of a new and coming world of utopian potential." The John Harvard Library edition follows the text of the expanded edition printed by the shop of Benjamin Towne for W. and T. Bradford of Philadelphia.
Main Description
“In Common Sense a writer found his moment to change the world,” Alan Taylor writes in his introduction. When Paine’s attack on the British mixed constitution of kings, lords, and commons was published in January 1776, fighting had already erupted between British troops and American Patriots, but many Patriots still balked at seeking independence. “By discrediting the sovereign king,” Taylor argues, “Paine made independence thinkable-as he relocated sovereignty from a royal family to the collective people of a republic.” Paine’s American readers could conclude that they stood at “the center of a new and coming world of utopian potential.” The John Harvard Library edition follows the text of the expanded edition printed by the shop of Benjamin Towne for W. and T. Bradford of Philadelphia.
Main Description
In Common Sense a writer found his moment to change the world, Alan Taylor writes in his introduction. When Paines attack on the British mixed constitution of kings, lords, and commons was published in January 1776, fighting had already erupted between British troops and American Patriots, but many Patriots still balked at seeking independence. By discrediting the sovereign king, Taylor argues, Paine made independence thinkable-as he relocated sovereignty from a royal family to the collective people of a republic. Paines American readers could conclude that they stood at the center of a new and coming world of utopian potential. The John Harvard Library edition follows the text of the expanded edition printed by the shop of Benjamin Towne for W. and T. Bradford of Philadelphia.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem