Catalogue


Augustus : image and substance /
Barbara Levick.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
Harlow, England : Longman, 2010.
description
xxiv, 351 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
9780582894211 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Harlow, England : Longman, 2010.
isbn
9780582894211 (pbk.)
contents note
Octavian : heir of an autocrat -- Augustus : political evolution -- Techniques of management and the feel-good factor -- Opposition and discontent -- The self-presentation of a monarch -- Augustus in art and literature -- Unmasking a god.
catalogue key
7306786
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 324-338) and indexes.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Barbara Levick is Emeritus Fellow and Tutor in Literae Humaniores at St. Hilda's College, Oxford and is the author of numerous works on the history of Ancient Rome.
Summaries
Main Description
Augustus Caesar is arguably the most important figure in Roman history. Barbara Levick provides a brilliant new re-appraisal of the life and personality of one of Rome's greatest and best known emperors. Barbara Levick is an experienced author and expert on Roman history Fully illustrated Rare polemical interpretation of Augustian politics, with a clear focus on the techniques used to acquire and sustain power Examination of "Augustian Spin", draws parallels between ancient and modern politicians and autocrats
Main Description
Augustus Caesar is arguably the most important figure in Roman history. Barbara Levick provides a brilliant new re-appraisal of the life and personality of one of Rome's greatest and best known emperors. Barbara Levick is an experienced author and expert on Roman history Fully illustrated Rare polemical interpretation of Augustian politics, with a clear focus on the techniques used to acquire and sustain power Examination of "Augustian Spin", draws parallels between ancient and modern politicians and autocrats
Long Description
Augustus Caesar was a fascinating and controversial man - arguably the most important figure in Roman history. A shrewd politician, he was able to achieve ultimate power in Rome. His political life (44 BC - AD 14) was dedicated to convert the failing Republic to a successful Principate which lasted for centuries, and his political legacy lives on today.This biographical study of Augustus seeks to expose the calculating methods used throughout his political life, arguing that they disguised the ruthlessness of his climb to the top and his subsequent hold on it, while enhancing his successes. Focusing on Augustus as the first spin doctor”, Barbara Levick's polemic interpretation emphasises the methods of his acquisition and maintenance of power and gives central importance to the deviousness and manipulation at the heart of his success.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Augustus Caesar was a fascinating man - arguably the most important figure in Roman history. A shrewd politician, he was able to achieve ultimate power in Rome. His political life was dedicated to converting the failing Republic to a successful Principate which lasted for centuries, & his political legacy lives on today.
Back Cover Copy
Throughout a long and spectacularly successful political life, the Emperor Augustus (63BC-AD14) was a master of spin.  Barbara Levick exposes the techniques which he used to disguise the ruthlessness of his rise to power and to enhance his successes once power was achieved.   There was, she argues, less difference than might appear between the ambitious youth who overthrew Anthony and Cleopatra and the admired Emperor of later years.  However seemingly benevolent his autocracy and substantial his achievements, Augustus' overriding purpose was always to keep himself and his dynasty in power.  Similar techniques were practised against surviving and fresh opponents, but with increasing skill and duplicity, and in the end the exhausted members of the political classes were content to accept their new ruler.  This book charts the stages of Augustus' rise, the evolution of his power and his methods of sustaining it, and finally the ways in which he used artists and literary men to glorify his image for his own time and times to come.   This fascinating story of the realities of power in ancient Rome has inescapable contemporary resonance and will appeal equally to students of the Ancient World and to the general reader.   Barbara Levick is Emeritus Fellow and Tutor in Literae Humaniores at St. Hilda's College, Oxford and the author of numerous works on the history of Ancient Rome.  
Back Cover Copy
Throughout a long and spectacularly successful political life, the Emperor Augustus (63BC-AD14) was a master of spin. Barbara Levick exposes the techniques which he used to disguise the ruthlessness of his rise to power and to enhance his successes once power was achieved. There was, she argues, less difference than might appear between the ambitious youth who overthrew Anthony and Cleopatra and the admired Emperor of later years. However seemingly benevolent his autocracy and substantial his achievements, Augustus' overriding purpose was always to keep himself and his dynasty in power. Similar techniques were practised against surviving and fresh opponents, but with increasing skill and duplicity, and in the end the exhausted members of the political classes were content to accept their new ruler. This book charts the stages of Augustus' rise, the evolution of his power and his methods of sustaining it, and finally the ways in which he used artists and literary men to glorify his image for his own time and times to come. This fascinating story of the realities of power in ancient Rome has inescapable contemporary resonance and will appeal equally to students of the Ancient World and to the general reader. Barbara Levick is Emeritus Fellow and Tutor in Literae Humaniores at St. Hilda's College, Oxford and the author of numerous works on the history of Ancient Rome.
Table of Contents
List of Maps and Figuresp. viii
Aknowledgementsp. ix
Publisher's Acknowledgementsp. x
Abbreviationsp. xi
Chronologyp. xviii
Introduction: The Enigmap. 1
Octavian: Heir of an Autocratp. 23
Augustus: Political Evolutionp. 63
Techniques of Management and the Feel-Good Factorp. 115
Opposition and Discontentp. 164
The Self-Presentation of a Monarchp. 202
Augustus in Art and Literaturep. 251
Unmasking a Godp. 288
Glossary of Ancient Termsp. 319
Bibliographyp. 324
Peoples and Placesp. 339
Personsp. 342
Generalp. 348
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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