Catalogue


The adventures of Pinocchio /
by Carlo Collodi ; translated from the Italian by Walter S. Cramp with editorial revision by Sara E. H. Lockwood and many original drawings by Charles Copeland.
imprint
Toronto : Copp Clark Co., c1904
description
vi, 212 p. : ill.
ISBN
9781590172896
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Toronto : Copp Clark Co., c1904
isbn
9781590172896
local note
Fisher copy: Bound in original green cloth, blocked in gold.
catalogue key
7305239
 
Purchase; George Flie; 2010; RB284797.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2005-09-19:
Two illustrated volumes of Carlo Collodi's Pinocchio take the spotlight this fall. Robert Ingpen's edition starts on a note of humor, with inset illustrations showcasing his meticulous ink lines and cross-hatching. He depicts the newly emerging Marionette wearing Geppetto's wig, for instance, or a full-page image of Geppetto fitting the fellow with new feet after the puppet's burn in a fire. A wordless spread of the Assassins making off with Pinocchio, however, exudes an appropriate creepiness. Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Reviews
Review Quotes
The book has the manic energy of 'Candide', as it rushes from one extreme situation to another. The new translation by Geoffrey Brock is wonderfully faithful to Collodi's speed and vigour. Until now, the best-known modern translation has been Ann Lawson Lucas's... Judged purely as a translation, however, Brock's version is more natural and engaging with a better feeling for how to turn colloquial 19th Century Tuscan into colloquial modern English. Brock is better at the humour, and unlike Lucas doesn't use quaint idioms or over translate. Sentence by sentence, Brock's Pinocchio has better rhythms.
Disney's sentimental depiction of Pinocchio bears little resemblance to Collodi's unscrupulous puppet. This new translation revives the sardonic wit and black humour of the original.
"Geoffrey Brock's new English translation of the subversive parable revives Carlo Collodi's sardonic wit and pitch-black humor, while bringing to life the poverty, moral vacuity, and uncensored violence of late-19th-century Europe...Brock known for his award-winning translations of authors such as Umberto Eco and Cesare Pavese strips away the sentimental veneer to reveal the original haunting fairy tale. Readers will be familiar with many of the characters, as well as the story's major plot points, but this version thankfully bears little resemblance to most modern interpretations. Pinocchio may have cast off his own strings, but Brock beautifully restores the historical knot." --BoldType
"Disney's sentimental depiction of Pinocchio bears little resemblance to Collodi's unscrupulous puppet. This new translation revives the sardonic wit and black humour of the original." --London Times "Carlo Collodi'sPinocchio...is short on Disneyesque sentimentality (there is a talking cricket, but Pinocchio squashes him), long on satire and farce. Geoffrey Brock's superbly crafted translation and Umberto Eco's introduction bring to life this tale of gumption and greed." --O Magazine "Geoffrey Brock's new English translation of the subversive parable revives Carlo Collodi's sardonic wit and pitch-black humor, while bringing to life the poverty, moral vacuity, and uncensored violence of late-19th-century Europe...Brock known for his award-winning translations of authors such as Umberto Eco and Cesare Pavese strips away the sentimental veneer to reveal the original haunting fairy tale. Readers will be familiar with many of the characters, as well as the story's major plot points, but this version thankfully bears little resemblance to most modern interpretations. Pinocchio may have cast off his own strings, but Brock beautifully restores the historical knot." --BoldType
"Disney's sentimental depiction of Pinocchio bears little resemblance to Collodi's unscrupulous puppet. This new translation revives the sardonic wit and black humour of the original." -- London Times "Carlo Collodi's Pinocchio ...is short on Disneyesque sentimentality (there is a talking cricket, but Pinocchio squashes him), long on satire and farce. Geoffrey Brock's superbly crafted translation and Umberto Eco's introduction bring to life this tale of gumption and greed." -- O Magazine "Geoffrey Brock's new English translation of the subversive parable revives Carlo Collodi's sardonic wit and pitch-black humor, while bringing to life the poverty, moral vacuity, and uncensored violence of late-19th-century Europe...Brock known for his award-winning translations of authors such as Umberto Eco and Cesare Pavese strips away the sentimental veneer to reveal the original haunting fairy tale. Readers will be familiar with many of the characters, as well as the story's major plot points, but this version thankfully bears little resemblance to most modern interpretations. Pinocchio may have cast off his own strings, but Brock beautifully restores the historical knot." --BoldType
"Carlo Collodi'sPinocchio...is short on Disneyesque sentimentality (there is a talking cricket, but Pinocchio squashes him), long on satire and farce. Geoffrey Brock's superbly crafted translation and Umberto Eco's introduction bring to life this tale of gumption and greed." --O Magazine "Geoffrey Brock's new English translation of the subversive parable revives Carlo Collodi's sardonic wit and pitch-black humor, while bringing to life the poverty, moral vacuity, and uncensored violence of late-19th-century Europe...Brock known for his award-winning translations of authors such as Umberto Eco and Cesare Pavese strips away the sentimental veneer to reveal the original haunting fairy tale. Readers will be familiar with many of the characters, as well as the story's major plot points, but this version thankfully bears little resemblance to most modern interpretations. Pinocchio may have cast off his own strings, but Brock beautifully restores the historical knot." --BoldType
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Summaries
Main Description
Though one of the best-known books in the world, Pinocchio at the same time remains unknown-linked in many minds to the Walt Disney movie that bears little relation to Carlo Collodi's splendid original. Yet it is hardly a sentimental or morally improving tale. To the contrary, Pinocchio is one of the great subversives of the written page, a madcap genius hurtled along at the pleasure and mercy of his desires, a renegade who in many ways resembles his near contemporary Huck Finn. Pinocchio the novel, no less than Pinocchio the character, is one of the great inventions of modern literature. The book merges the traditions of the picaresque, of street theater, and of folk and fairy tales into a work that is at once adventure, satire, and a powerful enchantment. Thronged with memorable characters and composed with the fluid but inevitable logic of a dream, Pinocchio is an endlessly fascinating work that is essential equipment for life.
Main Description
Though one of the best-known books in the world, Pinocchio at the same time remains unknownlinked in many minds to the Walt Disney movie that bears little relation to Carlo Collodi's splendid original. That story is of course about a puppet who, after many trials, succeeds in becoming a "real boy." Yet it is hardly a sentimental or morally improving tale. To the contrary, Pinocchio is one of the great subversives of the written page, a madcap genius hurtled along at the pleasure and mercy of his desires, a renegade who in many ways resembles his near contemporary Huck Finn. Pinocchio the novel, no less than Pinocchio the character, is one of the great inventions of modern literature. A sublime anomaly, the book merges the traditions of the picaresque, of street theater, and of folk and fairy tales into a work that is at once adventure, satire, and a powerful enchantment that anticipates surrealism and magical realism. Thronged with memorable characters and composed with the fluid but inevitable logic of a dream, Pinocchio is an endlessly fascinating work that is essential equipment for life.
Main Description
Though one of the best-known books in the world,Pinocchioat the same time remains unknownlinked in many minds to the Walt Disney movie that bears little relation to Carlo Collodi's splendid original. That story is of course about a puppet who, after many trials, succeeds in becoming a "real boy." Yet it is hardly a sentimental or morally improving tale. To the contrary, Pinocchio is one of the great subversives of the written page, a madcap genius hurtled along at the pleasure and mercy of his desires, a renegade who in many ways resembles his near contemporary Huck Finn. Pinocchiothe novel, no less than Pinocchio the character, is one of the great inventions of modern literature. A sublime anomaly, the book merges the traditions of the picaresque, of street theater, and of folk and fairy tales into a work that is at once adventure, satire, and a powerful enchantment that anticipates surrealism and magical realism. Thronged with memorable characters and composed with the fluid but inevitable logic of a dream,Pinocchiois an endlessly fascinating work that is essential equipment for life.
Main Description
Though one of the best-known books in the world,Pinocchioat the same time remains unknowncertainly in America, where it is linked in many minds to the Walt Disney movie that bears little relation to Carlo Collodi's splendid original. That storyis about, of course, a puppet who succeeds after many trials and tribulations in becoming a "real" boy, and is hardly the sentimental and morally improving tale it has been taken for. To the contrary, Pinocchio is one of the great subversives of the written page (you might compare him to his close contemporary Huck Finn), a madcap genius, hurtled along at the pleasure and mercy of his desires. It is his unabashedness, his unwillingness to give up on anything he wants, that drives him on and delights us. AndPinocchiothe book, like Pinocchio the character, is one of the great inventions of world literature, a sublime anomaly, merging the traditions of the picaresque, of the commedia dell'arte, and of the fairy tale into a singular book that is at once adventure, comedy, and irreducible conundrum, one that anticipates surrealism and magical realism. Thronged with memorable characters and composed with the fluid but inevitable logic of a dream,Pinocchiois a masterpiece of satire, fantasy, and sheer wonder that is endlessly absorbing, amusing, and surprising: essential equipment for life. In this new translation by Geoffrey Brock, the prizewinning translator of Cesare Pavese and Umberto Eco,Pinocchiofinally has an English rendering worthy of the inspired original.
Main Description
Though one of the best-known books in the world,Pinocchioat the same time remains unknowncertainly in America, where it is linked in many minds to the Walt Disney movie that bears little relation to Carlo Collodi's splendid original. That storyimprovised on a weekly basis over the course of two years for publication in a newspaperis about, of course, a puppet who succeeds after many trials and tribulations in becoming a "real" boy, and is hardly the sentimental and morally improving tale it has been taken for. To the contrary, Pinocchio is one of the great subversives of the written page (you might compare him to his close contemporary Huck Finn), a madcap genius, hurtled along at the pleasure and mercy of his desires. It is his unabashedness, his unwillingness to give up on anything he wants, that drives him on and delights us. AndPinocchiothe book, like Pinocchio the character, is one of the great inventions of world literature, a sublime anomaly, merging the traditions of the picaresque, of the commedia dell'arte, and of the fairy tale into a singular book that is at once adventure, comedy, and irreducible conundrum, one that anticipates the surrealism and magical realism that when it was written still lay far in the future. Thronged with memorable charactersthe Blue Fairy, the Fox and the Dog, and Fire Eaterand composed with the fluid but inevitable logic of a dream,Pinocchiois a masterpiece of satire, fantasy, and sheer wonder that is endlessly absorbing, amusing, and surprising: essential equipment for life. In this new translation by Geoffrey Brock, the prizewinning translator of Cesare Pavese and Umberto Eco,Pinocchiofinally has an English rendering worthy of the inspired original.
Bowker Data Service Summary
One of the best known stories in the world, 'Pinocchio' tells of a puppet who succeeds after many trials and tribulations in becoming a 'real' boy.
Table of Contents
How it happened that Master Cherry, a carpenter, found a piece of wood that cried and laughed like a little boyp. 3
Master Cherry gives the piece of wood to his friend Geppetto, who wants to make it into an amazing puppet that can dance and fence and do flipsp. 6
Back home, Geppetto immediately begins work on his puppet, which he names Pinocchio. The puppet's first pranksp. 9
The story of Pinocchio and the Talking Cricket, which shows that naughty children can't stand to be corrected by those who know bestp. 13
Pinocchio gets hungry and finds an egg to make an omelet with, but at the last second the omelet flies away, out the windowp. 16
Pinocchio falls asleep with his feet propped on the brazier, and the next morning he finds that his feet have burnt offp. 19
Poor Geppetto comes home and gives the puppet the breakfast he had brought for himselfp. 21
Geppetto makes Pinocchio a new pair of feet and sells his own coat to buy him a spelling bookp. 24
Pinocchio sells his spelling book in order to go see the Great Puppet Showp. 27
The puppets recognize Pinocchio as their brother and welcome him raucously; but when the puppet master shows up, Pinocchio is in danger of meeting a tragic endp. 30
Fire-Eater sneezes and forgives Pinocchio, who then saves his friend Harlequin from deathp. 33
Fire-Eater gives Pinocchio five gold pieces to take to his father, Geppetto. But Pinocchio is duped by the Fox and the Cat and goes off with them insteadp. 36
The Red Crayfish Innp. 41
Because he ignored the Talking Cricket's good advice, Pinocchio runs into murderersp. 45
The murderers chase Pinocchio, and when they catch him they hang him from a branch of the Big Oakp. 49
The Beautiful Girl with Sky-Blue Hair has the puppet taken down. She puts him to bed, and calls in three doctors to learn if he's alive or deadp. 52
Pinocchio eats the sugar, but won't take the purgative until he sees the gravediggers coming to carry him away. Then he tells a lie and, as punishment, his nose grows longerp. 56
Pinocchio again encounters the Fox and the Cat and goes with them to plant his four coins in the Field of Miraclesp. 61
Pinocchio is robbed of his gold coins and, as punishment, gets four months in jailp. 66
Freed from jail, he tries to return to the Fairy's house, but along the way he encounters a terrible Serpent, and after that he gets caught in a snarep. 70
Pinocchio is seized by a farmer and made to serve as a watchdog outside a henhousep. 73
Pinocchio thwarts the thieves and as a reward for being faithful is granted his libertyp. 76
Pinocchio mourns the death of the Beautiful Girl with Sky-Blue Hair. Then he meets a Pigeon who carries him to the sea, where he dives into the water to try to rescue Geppettop. 79
Pinocchio reaches Busy-Bee Island and finds the Fairy with Sky-Blue Hair againp. 84
Pinocchio promises the Fairy that he'll be good and to study, because he's tired of being a puppet and wants to become a good boyp. 90
Pinocchio goes to the seashore with his schoolmates to see the terrible Sharkp. 93
A great fight between Pinocchio and his schoolmates; one gets wounded, and the police arrest Pinocchiop. 96
Pinocchio is in danger of being fried up in a skillet, like a fishp. 102
Pinocchio returns to the house of the Fairy, who promises him that the next day he will cease to be a puppet and become a boy, A big breakfast is planned to celebrate this great eventp. 107
Instead of becoming a boy, Pinocchio sneaks off with his friend Lampwick to Toylandp. 114
After five months of nonstop fun, Pinocchio wakes up one morning to a rather nasty surprisep. 119
Pinocchio is amazed to discover a fine pair of donkey ears sprouting from his head. He turns into a donkey, tail and all, and begins to brayp. 125
Now a real donkey, Pinocchio is taken to market and sold to the Ringmaster of a circus, who wants to teach him to dance and jump through hoops. But one evening he becomes lame and so is sold to another man who wants to make a drum out of his hidep. 131
Thrown into the sea, Pinocchio is eaten by fish and becomes a puppet again. But as he is swimming to safety, he is swallowed up by the terrible Sharkp. 139
Inside the Shark's belly, Pinocchio is reunited with - with whom? Read this chapter to find outp. 146
At last Pinocchio ceases to be a puppet and becomes a boyp. 151
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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