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Going to windward : a Mosbacher family memoir /
Robert A. Mosbacher Sr. ; with James G. McGrath ; foreword by George H. W. Bush.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
College Station : Texas A&M University Press, c2010.
description
xii, 322 p.
ISBN
1603442219 (cloth : alk. paper), 9781603442213 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
College Station : Texas A&M University Press, c2010.
isbn
1603442219 (cloth : alk. paper)
9781603442213 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Foreword -- Prologue -- From less than nothing -- The boy plunger -- The breaks of a dozen men -- Guys and dolls -- "Paint it blue and sell it to Mosbacher" -- Luck in the breeze -- "From little acorns oak trees grow" "You don't have any acorns yet" -- Just get the crumbs -- Three cents in the ground -- Cover boys -- Stumbled into it -- No price on life or limb -- Blessed are the gatherers -- What do you win versus what do you lose? -- Do you suppose they'll believe I stayed? -- "Please, I don't like to beg" -- Mr. Secretary -- Don't screw it up -- Actions, not just words -- Don't let them put you out front -- When all is said and done, there's nothing left but family -- Epilogue.
general note
Includes index.
catalogue key
7302859
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"...an easy and interesting read, offering a fascinating behind-the-curtains view of how political economy and personality come together into power blocs"--Gary A. Keith, Southwestern Historical Quarterly
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
In a lifetime filled with exhilarating successes, heartbreaking failures, and tragic personal loss, Robert A. Mosbacher Sr. proved himself adept at navigating in calm seas and high winds alike. Whether besting the stiffest of national and international competition in a diverse array of amateur sailing championships over the course of a half century, or helping to chart his candidate's course across the American political landscape on the way to the White House in 1989, Mosbacher was never one to turn his back on any goal to which he had dedicated himself. Now, in this informative, entertaining, and deftly written memoir composed with the assistance of writer and trusted friend James G. McGrath, Mosbacher chronicles, in his own words, a life well spent. His perspective informed by everything from his father's meager childhood and remarkable successes as a trader on the New York Curb Exchange to his own three years of service as Secretary of Commerce in George H. W. Bush's administration, Mosbacher, the grandson of immigrants, possessed a distinctive vantage point on U.S. business and politics. In this volume of tightly woven, lively memories, he takes readers on an unforgettable ride with his father through the New York City of the 1930s, narrates his discovery of a huge natural gas field in the 1950s, and tells of his deepening involvement with the business and political power structures of Texas and the nation, beginning in the 1970s. Along the way, Mosbacher offers insights from family, business, and public life, with stories that engage, charm, and instruct. A must-read for Texas, political, business, and energy historians as well as general readers everywhere, Going to Windwardis an American success story that will warm the heart and capture the imagination.
Main Description
In a lifetime filled with exhilarating successes, heartbreaking failures, and tragic personal loss, Robert A. Mosbacher Sr. proved himself adept at navigating in calm seas and high winds alike. Whether besting the stiffest of national and international competition in a diverse array of amateur sailing championships over the course of a half century, or helping to chart his candidate's course across the American political landscape on the way to the White House in 1989, Mosbacher was never one to turn his back on any goal to which he had dedicated himself. Now, in this informative, entertaining, and deftly written memoir composed with the assistance of writer and trusted friend James G. McGrath, Mosbacher chronicles, in his own words, a life well spent. His perspective informed by everything from his father's meager childhood and remarkable successes as a trader on the New York Curb Exchange to his own three years of service as Secretary of Commerce in George H. W. Bush's administration, Mosbacher, the grandson of immigrants, possessed a distinctive vantage point on U.S. business and politics. In this volume of tightly woven, lively memories, he takes readers on an unforgettable ride with his father through the New York City of the 1930s, narrates his discovery of a huge natural gas field in the 1950s, and tells of his deepening involvement with the business and political power structures of Texas and the nation, beginning in the 1970s. Along the way, Mosbacher offers insights from family, business, and public life, with stories that engage, charm, and instruct. A must-read for Texas, political, business, and energy historians as well as general readers everywhere,Going to Windwardis an American success story that will warm the heart and capture the imagination.
Main Description
In a lifetime filled with exhilarating successes, heartbreaking failures, and tragic personal loss, Robert A. Mosbacher Sr. proved himself adept at navigating in calm seas and high winds alike. Whether besting the stiffest of national and international competition in a diverse array of amateur sailing championships over the course of a half century, or helping to chart his candidate’s course across the American political landscape on the way to the White House in 1989, Mosbacher was never one to turn his back on any goal to which he had dedicated himself. Now, in this informative, entertaining, and deftly written memoir composed with the assistance of writer and trusted friend James G. McGrath, Mosbacher chronicles, in his own words, a life well spent. His perspective informed by everything from his father’s meager childhood and remarkable successes as a trader on the New York Curb Exchange to his own three years of service as Secretary of Commerce in George H. W. Bush’s administration, Mosbacher, the grandson of immigrants, possessed a distinctive vantage point on U.S. business and politics. In this volume of tightly woven, lively memories, he takes readers on an unforgettable ride with his father through the New York City of the 1930s, narrates his discovery of a huge natural gas field in the 1950s, and tells of his deepening involvement with the business and political power structures of Texas and the nation, beginning in the 1970s. Along the way, Mosbacher offers insights from family, business, and public life, with stories that engage, charm, and instruct. A must-read for Texas, political, business, and energy historians as well as general readers everywhere, Going to Windwardis an American success story that will warm the heart and capture the imagination.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Forewordp. xi
Prologuep. 1
From Less Than Nothingp. 9
The Boy Plungerp. 20
The Breaks of a Dozen Menp. 27
Guys and Dollsp. 35
ôPaint It Blue and Sell It to Mosbacheröp. 46
Luck in the Breezep. 56
ôFrom Little Acorns Oak Trees Grow…You Don't Have Any Acorns Yetöp. 65
Just Get the Crumbsp. 78
Three Cents in the Groundp. 92
Cover Boysp. 101
Stumbled into Itp. 114
No Price on Life or Limbp. 126
Blessed Are the Gatherersp. 143
What Do You Win Versus What Do You Lose?p. 158
Do You Suppose They'll Believe I Stayed?p. 174
ôPlease, I Don't Like to Begöp. 187
Mr. Secretaryp. 198
Don't Screw It Upp. 224
Actions, Not Just Wordsp. 246
Don't Let Them Put You Out Frontp. 260
When All Is Said and Done, There's Nothing Left But Familyp. 277
Epiloguep. 305
Indexp. 313
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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