Catalogue


Caliph of Cairo : Al-Hakim bi-Amr Allah, 996-1021 /
Paul E. Walker.
imprint
Cairo ; New York : American University in Cairo Press, 2009.
description
viii, 325 p. : maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
9774163281 (hardcover), 9789774163289 (hardcover)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cairo ; New York : American University in Cairo Press, 2009.
isbn
9774163281 (hardcover)
9789774163289 (hardcover)
catalogue key
7301158
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [309]-316) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Walker's work is a well-researched, unbiased and engaging expos of a melodramatic subject. . . . A fascinating aspect of Walker's study is his attempt to position in proper historical context the precise role women played in the Fatimid period. This particular debate has never been more urgent. . . . The author's sources are multifarious and variegated. Al Ahram Weekly
"Walker's work is a well-researched, unbiased and engaging exposé of a melodramatic subject. . . . A fascinating aspect of Walker's study is his attempt to position in proper historical context the precise role women played in the Fatimid period. This particular debate has never been more urgent. . . . The author's sources are multifarious and variegated." --Al Ahram Weekly
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2010
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
One night in the year 411/1021, the powerful ruler of Fatimid Cairo, al-Hakim bi-Amr Allah, rode out of the southern gates of his city and was never seen again. Was the caliph murdered, or could he have decided to abandon his royal life, wandering off to live alone and anonymous? Whatever the truth, the fact was that al-Hakim had literally vanished into the desert. Yet al-Hakim, though shrouded in mystery, has never been forgotten. To the Druze, he was (and is) God, and his disappearance merely indicated his reversion to non-human form. For Ismailis, al-Hakim was the sixteenth imam, descended from the Prophet, and infallible. Jews and Christians, by contrast, long remembered him as their persecutor, who ordered the destruction of many of their synagogues and churches. Using all the tools of modern scholarship, Paul Walker offers the most balanced and engaging biography yet to be published of this endlessly fascinating individual.
Main Description
One night in the year 411/1021, the powerful ruler of Fatimid Cairo, al-Hakim bi-Amr Allah, rode out of the southern gates of his city and was never seen again. Was the caliph murdered, or could he have decided to abandon his royal life, wandering off to live alone and anonymous? Whatever thetruth, the fact was that al-Hakim had literally vanished into the desert. Yet al-Hakim, though shrouded in mystery, has never been forgotten. To the Druze, he was (and is) God, and his disappearance merely indicated his reversion to non-human form. For Ismailis, al-Hakim was the sixteenth imam, descended from the Prophet, and infallible. Jews and Christians, by contrast,long remembered him as their persecutor, who ordered the destruction of many of their synagogues and churches. Using all the tools of modern scholarship, Paul Walker offers the most balanced and engaging biography yet to be published of this endlessly fascinating individual.
Main Description
One night in the year 411/1021, the powerful ruler of the Fatimid empire, al-Hakim bi-Amr Allah, rode out of the southern gates of Cairo and was never seen again. Was the caliph murdered, or could he have decided to abandon his royal life, wandering off to live alone and anonymous? Whateverthe truth, the fact was that al-Hakim had literally vanished into the desert. Yet al-Hakim, though shrouded in mystery, has never been forgotten. To the Druze, he was (and is) God, and his disappearance merely indicated his reversion to non-human form. For Ismailis, al-Hakim was the sixteenth imam,descended from the Prophet, and infallible. Jews and Christians, by contrast, long remembered him as their persecutor, who ordered the destruction of many of their synagogues and churches. Using all the tools of modern scholarship, Paul Walker offers the most balanced and engaging biography yet tobe published of this endlessly fascinating individual.To some, al-Hakim was God incarnate, to others an infallible imam, to still others he was a capricious tyrant. This book examines myth and fact, document and opinion, to present the most complete and detailed history yet written of the life and times of one of the medieval Islamic world's mostcontroversial figures.

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