Catalogue


Political change in Japan : electoral behavior, party realignment, and the Koizumi reforms /
edited by Steven R. Reed, Kenneth Mori McElwain, and Kay Shimizu.
imprint
Stanford, CA : Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center ; Baltimore, MD : Brookings Institution [distributor], c2009.
description
xii, 319 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
1931368147, 9781931368148
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Stanford, CA : Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center ; Baltimore, MD : Brookings Institution [distributor], c2009.
isbn
1931368147
9781931368148
contents note
1. An overview of postwar Japanese politics / Steven R. Reed and Kay Shimizu -- 2. Avoiding a two-party system : the Liberal Democratic Party versus Duverger's Law / Steven R. Reed and Kay Shimizu -- 3. Has the electoral-system reform made Japanese elections party-centered? / Ko Maeda -- 4. Pork barrel politics and partisan realignment in Japan / Jun Saito -- 5. Declining electoral competitiveness in Japan : postreform trends and theoretical pessimism / Robert J. Weiner -- 6. How Koizumi won / Chao-Chi Lin -- 7. How long are Koizumi's coattails? Party-leader visits in the 2005 election / Kenneth Mori McElwain -- 8. Two steps forward, one step back : Japanese postal privatization as a window on political and policymaking change / Patricia L. Maclachlan -- 9. The slow government response to Japan's bank crisis : a new interpretation / Ethan Scheiner and Michio Muramatsu -- 10. Stealing elections : a comparison of election-night corruption in Japan, Canada, and the United States / Ray Christensen and Kyle Colvin -- 11. The puzzle of the Japanese gender gap in Liberal Democratic Party support / Barry C. Burden -- 12. Women running for national office in Japan : are Koizumi's female "children" a short-term anomaly or a lasting phenomenon? / Alisa Gaunder -- 13. Surrogate representation : building sustainable linkage structures in contemporary Japanese politics / Sherry L. Martin -- 14. Japanese politics in the Koizumi era : temporary anomaly or a paradigm shift? / Kenneth Mori McElwain and Steven R. Reed.
general note
Based on papers originally presented at the 2007 Stanford Conference on Electoral and Legislative Politics in Japan, held at Stanford University.
catalogue key
7299494
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Steven R. Reed is a professor of modern government at Chuo University, Tokyo, Japan. He has taught in Japan and in Japanese for the past fifteen years. Kenneth Mori McElwain is an assistant professor of political science at the University of Michigan. He studies how partisan incentives influence the design of political institutions. Kay Shimizu is an assistant professor of political science at Columbia University. Her research examines how politics determines economic outcomes and the institutions that facilitate political influence.
Summaries
Main Description
In the early 1990s, Japanese reformers promised a political transformation: fewer pork-barrel projects, more accountability, and greater transparency. Have these promises been realized? In the past twenty years, Japanese politics has undergone many dramatic changes. Electoral reform altered the relationship between politicians and voters, and Japan has steadily moved toward a two-party system. Amid these shifts, it remains unclear where Japanese politics is heading, and whether the changes we observe now will stand the test of time. Each chapter in this wide-ranging volume addresses a key political development in Japan, notably voting behavior, the relationship between politicians and bureaucrats, gender gaps in political candidacies, and $$ versus ideological politics. Political Change in Japan likewise $$ extensive discussion of former $$ Minister $$ career. In sum, the $$ the probable permanence $$ Intended $$ timely volume provides value $$ for comparative political scientists as well. With contributions from some of the most eminent scholars working on Japan today, Political Change in Japan seeks to answer the question: Was political reform in Japan a revolution or a flash in the pan? Book jacket.
Main Description
In the past twenty years, Japan has undergone dramatic changes. Electoral reform has altered the relationship between politicians and voters, and Japan is increasingly a two-party system. The popularity of former prime minister Koizumi Junichiro highlighted the salience of telegenic party leaders. Amid so many shifts, it remains unclear whether such changes will stand the test of time and where Japanese politics is heading. However, it is not too early to assess the permanence and the direction of political change in Japan. Each chapter in this wide-ranging volume addresses a key political development in Japan --from "stealing votes" to the constraints that women candidates face. Intended for scholars and students who study Japan, this timely volume also provides valuable reading for comparative political scientists. With contributions from some of the most distinguished scholars working on Japan today, Political Change in Japan seeks to answer the question: Was political reform in Japan a revolution or a flash in the pan?
Main Description
In the past twenty years, Japan has undergone dramatic changes. Electoral reform has altered the relationship between politicians and voters, and Japan is increasingly a two-party system. The popularity of former prime minister Koizumi Junichiro highlighted the salience of telegenic party leaders.Amid so many shifts, it remains unclear whether such changes will stand the test of time and where Japanese politics is heading. However, it is not too early to assess the permanence and the direction of political change in Japan. Each chapter in this wide-ranging volume addresses a key political development in Japan --from "stealing votes" to the constraints that women candidates face.Intended for scholars and students who study Japan, this timely volume also provides valuable reading for comparative political scientists. With contributions from some of the most distinguished scholars working on Japan today, Political Change in Japan seeks to answer the question: Was political reform in Japan a revolution or a flash in the pan?
Table of Contents
Prefacep. vii
Introductionp. 3
An Overview of Postwar Japanese Politicsp. 5
Electoral Politicsp. 27
Avoiding a Two-Party System: The Liberal Democratic Party versus Duverger's Lawp. 29
Has the Electoral-System Reform Made Japanese Elections Party-Centered?p. 47
Pork-Barrel Politics and Partisan Realignment in Japanp. 67
Declining Electoral Competitiveness in Japan: Postreform Trends and Theoretical Pessimismp. 87
Koizumip. 107
How Koizumi Wonp. 109
How Long Are Koizumi's Coattails? Party-Leader Visits in the 2005 Electionp. 133
Two Steps Forward, One Step Back: Japanese Postal Privatization as a Window on Political and Policymaking Changep. 157
Beyond Electoral Politicsp. 181
The Slow Government Response to Japan's Bank Crisis: A New Interpretationp. 181
Stealing Elections: A Comparison of Election-Night Corruption in Japan, Canada, and the United Statesp. 199
Women in Politicsp. 219
The Puzzle of the Japanese Gender Gap in Liberal Democratic Party Supportp. 221
Women Running for National Office in Japan: Are Koizumi's Female "Children" a Short-Term Anomaly or a Lasting Phenomenon?p. 239
Surrogate Representation: Building Sustainable Linkage Structures in Contemporary Japanese Politicsp. 261
Conclusionp. 279
Japanese Politics in the Koizumi Era: Temporary Anomaly or a Paradigm Shift?p. 281
Indexp. 293
About the Contributorsp. 317
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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