Catalogue


Reproducing women : medicine, metaphor, and childbirth in late imperial China /
Yi-Li Wu.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2010.
description
xiii, 362 p.
ISBN
0520260686 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780520260689 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2010.
isbn
0520260686 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780520260689 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
"Medicine for women" and the literate medical tradition -- Amateur as arbiter : popular publishing and fuke manuals -- The palace of the child : function and structure in the female body -- An uncertain harvest : pregnancy and miscarriage -- "Born like a lamb" : the discourse of cosmologically resonant childbirth -- To generate and transform : strategies for postpartum health -- Epilogue: body, gender, and medical legitimacy.
catalogue key
7299074
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"This is a tremendously rich, exhaustively researched work.Reproducing Womenis a pioneering study that will undoubtedly become a standard reading on women's medicine in Chinese history."--Ruth Rogaski, author ofHygienic Modernity
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This work uses the lens of cultural history to examine the development of medicine in Qing dynasty China. Focusing on the specialty of 'medicine for women', the author explores the material and ideological issues associated with childbearing in the late imperial period.
Main Description
This innovative book uses the lens of cultural history to examine the development of medicine in Qing dynasty China. Focusing on the specialty of "medicine for women"(fuke), Yi-Li Wu explores the material and ideological issues associated with childbearing in the late imperial period. She draws on a rich array of medical writings that circulated in seventeenth- to nineteenth-century China to analyze the points of convergence and contention that shaped people's views of women's reproductive diseases. These points of contention touched on fundamental issues: How different were women's bodies from men's? What drugs were best for promoting conception and preventing miscarriage? Was childbirth inherently dangerous? And who was best qualified to judge? Wu shows that late imperial medicine approached these questions with a new, positive perspective, defining female and male illnesses as essentially alike and depicting childbirth as an inherently trouble-free process. In presenting this new view of the female body,Reproducing Womenrevises our understanding of Qing social relations of healing and attendant cultural assumptions about gender, the body, and nature.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introductionp. 1
Late Imperial Fuke and the Literate Medical Traditionp. 15
Amateur as Arbiter: Popular Fuke Manuals in the Qingp. 54
Function and Structure in the Female Bodyp. 84
An Uncertain Harvest: Pregnancy and Miscarriagep. 120
ôBorn Like a Lambö: The Discourse of Cosmologically Resonant Childbirthp. 147
To Generate and Transform: Strategies for Postpartum Healthp. 188
Epilogue: Body, Gender, and Medical Legitimacyp. 224
Notesp. 237
Glossaryp. 311
Bibliographyp. 319
Indexp. 343
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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