Catalogue


Indigenous writings from the convent : negotiating ethnic autonomy in colonial Mexico /
Mónica Díaz.
imprint
Tucson : University of Arizona Press, c2010.
description
xiii, 229 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0816528535 (hbk.), 9780816528530 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
Tucson : University of Arizona Press, c2010.
isbn
0816528535 (hbk.)
9780816528530 (hbk.)
contents note
Indigenous nobility and conventual foundations -- The idea of corpus Christi : discursive effects of colonialism -- Indigenous women and religious life : stereotype and ambivalence -- Biographies and hagiographies : the different perspectives of gender -- Panegyric sermons : dialogic spaces and examples of virtue -- Letters from the convent : struggles through the written word.
catalogue key
7299001
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [205]-223) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
This book examines ways in which indigenous women participated in one of the most prominent institutions in colonial times--the Catholic Church--and what they made of their experience with convent life. It will appeal to scholars of literary criticism, women's studies, and colonial history, and to anyone interested in the ways that class, race, and gender intersected in the colonial world.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This superbly researched study of Mexico's indigenous female religious should be read by any scholar interested in gender, race, and conventual writing." --Colonial Latin American Historical Review
"This superbly researched study of Mexico's indigenous female religious should be read by any scholar interested in gender, race, and conventual writing." Colonial Latin American Historical Review
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, November 2010
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This work examines ways in which indigenous women participated in one of the most prominent institutions in colonial times - the Catholic Church - and what they made of their experience with convent life.
Main Description
Sometime in the 1740s, Sor María Magdalena, an indigenous noblewoman living in one of only three convents in New Spain that allowed Indians to profess as nuns, sent a letter to Father Juan de Altamirano to ask for his help in getting church prelates to exclude Creole and Spanish women from convents intended for indigenous nuns only. Drawing on this and other such lettersas well as biographies, sermons, and other textsMónica Díaz argues that the survival of indigenous ethnic identity was effectively served by this class of noble indigenous nuns. While colonial sources that refer to indigenous women are not scant, documents in which women emerge as agents who actively participate in shaping their own identity are rare. Looking at this minority agencyor subaltern voicein various religious discourses exposes some central themes. It shows that an indigenous identity recast in Catholic terms was able to be effectively recorded and that the religious participation of these women at a time when indigenous parishes were increasingly secularized lent cohesion to that identity. Indigenous Writings from the Convent examines ways in which indigenous women participated in one of the most prominent institutions in colonial timesthe Catholic Churchand what they made of their experience with convent life. This book will appeal to scholars of literary criticism, women's studies, and colonial history, and to anyone interested in the ways that class, race, and gender intersected in the colonial world.
Main Description
Sometime in the 1740s, Sor Maria Magdalena, an indigenous noblewoman living in one of only three convents in New Spain that allowed Indians to profess as nuns, sent a letter to Father Juan de Altamirano to ask for his help in getting church prelates to exclude Creole and Spanish women from convents intended for indigenous nuns only. Drawing on this and other such letters--as well as biographies, sermons, and other texts--Monica Diaz argues that the survival of indigenous ethnic identity was effectively served by this class of noble indigenous nuns. While colonial sources that refer to indigenous women are not scant, documents in which women emerge as agents who actively participate in shaping their own identity are rare. Looking at this minority agency--or subaltern voice--in various religious discourses exposes some central themes. It shows that an indigenous identity recast in Catholic terms was able to be effectively recorded and that the religious participation of these women at a time when indigenous parishes were increasingly secularized lent cohesion to that identity. "Indigenous Writings from the Convent" examines ways in which indigenous women participated in one of the most prominent institutions in colonial times--the Catholic Church--and what they made of their experience with convent life. This book will appeal to scholars of literary criticism, womens studies, and colonial history, and to anyone interested in the ways that class, race, and gender intersected in the colonial world.
Main Description
Sometime in the 1740s, Sor Mar a Magdalena, an indigenous noblewoman living in one of only three convents in New Spain that allowed Indians to profess as nuns, sent a letter to Father Juan de Altamirano to ask for his help in getting church prelates to exclude Creole and Spanish women from convents intended for indigenous nuns only. Drawing on this and other such letters--as well as biographies, sermons, and other texts--M nica D az argues that the survival of indigenous ethnic identity was effectively served by this class of noble indigenous nuns. While colonial sources that refer to indigenous women are not scant, documents in which women emerge as agents who actively participate in shaping their own identity are rare. Looking at this minority agency--or subaltern voice--in various religious discourses exposes some central themes. It shows that an indigenous identity recast in Catholic terms was able to be effectively recorded and that the religious participation of these women at a time when indigenous parishes were increasingly secularized lent cohesion to that identity. Indigenous Writings from the Convent examines ways in which indigenous women participated in one of the most prominent institutions in colonial times--the Catholic Church--and what they made of their experience with convent life. This book will appeal to scholars of literary criticism, women's studies, and colonial history, and to anyone interested in the ways that class, race, and gender intersected in the colonial world.
Main Description
Sometime in the 1740s, Sor María Magdalena, an indigenous noblewoman living in one of only three convents in New Spain that allowed Indians to profess as nuns, sent a letter to Father Juan de Altamirano to ask for his help in getting church prelates to exclude Creole and Spanish women from convents intended for indigenous nuns only. Drawing on this and other such letters--as well as biographies, sermons, and other texts--Mónica Díaz argues that the survival of indigenous ethnic identity was effectively served by this class of noble indigenous nuns. While colonial sources that refer to indigenous women are not scant, documents in which women emerge as agents who actively participate in shaping their own identity are rare. Looking at this minority agency--or subaltern voice--in various religious discourses exposes some central themes. It shows that an indigenous identity recast in Catholic terms was able to be effectively recorded and that the religious participation of these women at a time when indigenous parishes were increasingly secularized lent cohesion to that identity. Indigenous Writings from the Convent examines ways in which indigenous women participated in one of the most prominent institutions in colonial times--the Catholic Church--and what they made of their experience with convent life. This book will appeal to scholars of literary criticism, women's studies, and colonial history, and to anyone interested in the ways that class, race, and gender intersected in the colonial world.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. vii
A Note on Sources and the Appendixesp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Abbreviationsp. xiii
Introductionp. 1
Indigenous Nobility and Conventual Foundationsp. 25
The Idea of Corpus Christi: Discursive Effects of Colonialismp. 42
Indigenous Women and Religious Life: Stereotype and Ambivalencep. 63
Biographies and Hagiographies: The Different Perspectives of Genderp. 85
Panegyric Sermons: Dialogic Spaces and Examples of Virtuep. 110
Letters from the Convent: Struggles through the Written Wordp. 135
Epiloguep. 154
Selected Text from "Notes on Some of Our Deceased Sisters"p. 159
Selected Text from the Funeral Eulogy of Sor María Teodora de San Agustínp. 169
Selected Lettersp. 173
Notesp. 183
Bibliographyp. 205
Indexp. 225
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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